Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Review Of "Vessels And Variety: New Aspects Of Ancient Pottery", Justin St. P. Walsh Apr 2014

Review Of "Vessels And Variety: New Aspects Of Ancient Pottery", Justin St. P. Walsh

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Book Review of Vessels and Variety: New Aspects of Ancient Pottery, edited by Hanne Thomasen, Annette Rathje, and Kristen Bøggild Johannsen


Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio Jan 2014

Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Excavation of archaic Morgantina (c.700–450 BC), Sicily, has brought to light a significant pattern in the distribution of imported Greek pottery. This pattern, which shows a preference for imports with features that referred to metal vessels, is echoed at sites around the western Mediterranean. We argue that the preference for certain types was communicated back to Greek producers, and that it also reflects the particular local interests of non-Greeks, who associated metallic features not only with wealth, but also with their own ancestral traditions.


Review Of The Imagery Of The Athenian Symposium, Justin St. P. Walsh Jan 2014

Review Of The Imagery Of The Athenian Symposium, Justin St. P. Walsh

Art Faculty Articles and Research

A review of Kathryn Topper's The Imagery of the Athenian Symposium.


Severan Marble Plan Of Rome Data Files, Justin St. P. Walsh Jan 2014

Severan Marble Plan Of Rome Data Files, Justin St. P. Walsh

Art Faculty Data Sets

In its original state, the Severan Marble Plan of Rome, placed on the wall of the Temple of Peace between 203 and 211 CE, showed viewers the locations of buildings throughout Rome, and even the groundplan of each of those buildings. It is today an extraordinary piece of evidence for understanding the city in that time period, despite its ruinous state. It survives in over 1,100 fragments, representing only about 10% of its original surface area. To date, scholars have successfully placed only about 100 of those fragments with respect to the buildings they depict. Using GIS and CAD ...