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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Printing The Bible, Megan R. Wu May 2014

Printing The Bible, Megan R. Wu

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


Reading Cleopatra Vii: The Crafting Of A Political Persona, Angelica E. Delaney Apr 2014

Reading Cleopatra Vii: The Crafting Of A Political Persona, Angelica E. Delaney

The Kennesaw Journal of Undergraduate Research

No abstract provided.


Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory Apr 2014

Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The three bronze doors of the Baptistery of San Giovanni stand as public expressions of Florence’s imperial history, economic stability, and artistic advances. These commissions can only be understood in their physical context within the Baptistery, the city’s most revered monument. The Baptistery testifies to Florence’s imperial Roman and early Christian history, and it serves vital religious and civic functions within the commune. Each bronze door guards the liminal space between the city’s public sphere and the sacred interior where the baptismal ritual is performed. The bronze medium and the narrative style of the doors further ...


Visual Forms, Visceral Themes: Understanding Bodies, Pain, And Torture In Renaissance Art, Helena Guzik Fcrh '12 Jan 2014

Visual Forms, Visceral Themes: Understanding Bodies, Pain, And Torture In Renaissance Art, Helena Guzik Fcrh '12

The Fordham Undergraduate Research Journal

Despite its relevance to modern discussions, the scholarly treatment of torture in art is relatively infrequent. This project explores, through the visual evidence of artistic works, the implications of Renaissance philosophies surrounding the human body in the context of pain and particularly the physical suffering endured during torture. By examining varying techniques of representing the human form across an array of artistic media, this article strives to illuminate the struggle between the rise of scientific naturalism and prevailing currents of spiritual dualism when considering the question of the body in torment. In highlighting the artist as narrator of Renaissance society ...


Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart Jan 2014

Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

When Jacob Seisenegger and Titian painted individual portraits of Emperor Charles V around 1532, a dog replaced such traditional accouterments of imperial power as crown, scepter, and orb.3 Charles placed one hand on the dog’s collar, a gesture indicating his companion’s noble qualities including faithfulness.4 At the same time, another more down-to-earth meaning for the dog had become prominent in the decades before the imperial portraits: the interest in and ability to eat anything in sight. This pig-like ability resulted in dogs, alongside pigs, becoming emblems of indiscriminate and gluttonous eating and drinking during the early ...