Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

The Hierarchy Of Rococo Women Seen Through Fashion Paintings, Sanda Brighidin Aug 2014

The Hierarchy Of Rococo Women Seen Through Fashion Paintings, Sanda Brighidin

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

The style of Rococo evokes a variety of feminine attributions; women were usually depicted in works of art in a decorative manner. Many of the interpretations of these paintings focus on the luxurious clothes and lavish backgrounds. Artists like Jean-Antoine Watteau and Francois Boucher were responsible for elevating a very elegant view of Rococo women of Rococo within the public’s eyes. But there were also depictions of non-aristocratic women that were geared more to the middle class (bourgeois). After reading a number of articles and book chapters on Jean-Baptiste- Simeon Chardin, and visiting the Louvre museum in Paris, I ...


Unicums, Fragments, And Other Hebrew Book Rarities, Marvin J. Heller Jun 2014

Unicums, Fragments, And Other Hebrew Book Rarities, Marvin J. Heller

Judaica Librarianship

The subject matter of this article is unique or rare editions of early Hebrew books. Due to varying external circumstances, these rare books are extant only in fragments, unique single exemplars, or in a limited number of copies. Although Hebrew texts were subject to the same ravages of time and, perhaps, occasional indifference as were other early books, they also suffered to a much greater extent than their non-Hebrew counterparts from the indignities and deeds, or more accurately misdeeds, of anti-Semites who expended their wrath not only on Jews but also directed their venom towards Jewish books. The article is ...


Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory Apr 2014

Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The three bronze doors of the Baptistery of San Giovanni stand as public expressions of Florence’s imperial history, economic stability, and artistic advances. These commissions can only be understood in their physical context within the Baptistery, the city’s most revered monument. The Baptistery testifies to Florence’s imperial Roman and early Christian history, and it serves vital religious and civic functions within the commune. Each bronze door guards the liminal space between the city’s public sphere and the sacred interior where the baptismal ritual is performed. The bronze medium and the narrative style of the doors further ...


Society And Style: Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Alison G. Stewart, Paul Royster Jan 2014

Society And Style: Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Alison G. Stewart, Paul Royster

Zea E-Books

This collection of works explores how Societies and Styles changed over the course of Early Modern Europe (1500-1800) from the time of the advent of printing on paper to the Industrial Revolution and beyond through little-seen printed masterpieces from the Sheldon Museum of Art’s collection. Today, “print” continues to endure even as new forms of digital publications transform our world in previously unimaginable ways, just as printing did centuries ago.

This exhibition offers a view into the ways printed works of art on paper (mostly woodcuts, engravings, and etchings) showcase society and its various aspects, ranging from one Christian ...


Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart Jan 2014

Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

When Jacob Seisenegger and Titian painted individual portraits of Emperor Charles V around 1532, a dog replaced such traditional accouterments of imperial power as crown, scepter, and orb.3 Charles placed one hand on the dog’s collar, a gesture indicating his companion’s noble qualities including faithfulness.4 At the same time, another more down-to-earth meaning for the dog had become prominent in the decades before the imperial portraits: the interest in and ability to eat anything in sight. This pig-like ability resulted in dogs, alongside pigs, becoming emblems of indiscriminate and gluttonous eating and drinking during the early ...