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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

From Lace To Chains. The Making Of A Print, Alison G. Stewart Apr 2019

From Lace To Chains. The Making Of A Print, Alison G. Stewart

Zea E-Books

How have printed works of art changed over time? Do printmakers today work with the same materials and techniques that printmakers used centuries ago? And does printmaking involve the same motivations, concerns, or methods of distribution today as it did in the past?

These were questions asked by University of Nebraska–Lincoln students in a history of prints class in the School of Art, Art History & Design taught by Hixson-Lied Professor of Art History Alison Stewart during fall semester 2018. For this curatorial project, students selected one set of old master prints (pre-1850) and one modern (post-1850) print from Sheldon ...


Economic Underpinning Of Renaissance Italian Art, Katherine Jacobson Apr 2014

Economic Underpinning Of Renaissance Italian Art, Katherine Jacobson

Undergraduate Research Symposium 2014

In 1902, art historian, Aby Warburg, asserted that in Renaissance Italy, "works of art owed their making to the mutual understanding between patrons and artists. The works were, from the outset, the results of a negotiation between client and executant". This research seeks to examine patronage relationships in the context of politically fragmented Renaissance Italy to further our understanding of art's ability to promote political, ideological, or religious agendas. By referencing renowned works of art from the Italian Renaissance, I attempt to identify the significance of using culture and art as a rhetorical tool, rather than other more direct ...


Adorn The Halls: History Of The Art Collection At Thomas Jefferson University, Julie S. Berkowitz Jan 1999

Adorn The Halls: History Of The Art Collection At Thomas Jefferson University, Julie S. Berkowitz

Jefferson History Books

On March 11, 1871 Samuel D. Gross, M.D., the internationally celebrated surgeon and author, entreated fellow Jefferson alumni to "adorn the halls" with portraits of those who had "devoted their lives to the service of the school," and thus "inspire the pupil with ambition to excel in great and noble works." This clarion call to emulate European medical and scientific institutions by memorializing their great men was taken up almost immediately.

One hundred and twenty-five years later, Thomas Jefferson university is still securing portraits, accepting art donations and bequests, and exhibiting art works effectively. By manifesting an appreciation for ...