Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Review Of "Vessels And Variety: New Aspects Of Ancient Pottery", Justin St. P. Walsh Apr 2014

Review Of "Vessels And Variety: New Aspects Of Ancient Pottery", Justin St. P. Walsh

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Book Review of Vessels and Variety: New Aspects of Ancient Pottery, edited by Hanne Thomasen, Annette Rathje, and Kristen Bøggild Johannsen


Review Of The Imagery Of The Athenian Symposium, Justin St. P. Walsh Jan 2014

Review Of The Imagery Of The Athenian Symposium, Justin St. P. Walsh

Art Faculty Articles and Research

A review of Kathryn Topper's The Imagery of the Athenian Symposium.


Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio Jan 2014

Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Excavation of archaic Morgantina (c.700–450 BC), Sicily, has brought to light a significant pattern in the distribution of imported Greek pottery. This pattern, which shows a preference for imports with features that referred to metal vessels, is echoed at sites around the western Mediterranean. We argue that the preference for certain types was communicated back to Greek producers, and that it also reflects the particular local interests of non-Greeks, who associated metallic features not only with wealth, but also with their own ancestral traditions.


Baciccio's Beata Ludovica Albertoni Distributing Alms, Karen J. Lloyd Jan 2010

Baciccio's Beata Ludovica Albertoni Distributing Alms, Karen J. Lloyd

Art Faculty Articles and Research

This article focuses on the artistic relationship between Baciccio and Gian Lorenzo Bernini.


Russian Icons And American Money, 1928-1938, Wendy Salmond Jan 2009

Russian Icons And American Money, 1928-1938, Wendy Salmond

Art Faculty Articles and Research

The article explores the marketing tactics and consumer expectations with regards to icons released in the street markets and provincial cities of Soviet Russia and acquired by American collectors from 1928-1938. These icons, including those from Byzantium in the tenth century, were seen as cultural commodities during the Russian revolution and the subsequent socialist construction. The Soviet apparatus Antikvariat was tasked with appraising the icon collections held by the Gosmuzeifond or the State Museum Reserve for exports.