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Articles 1 - 25 of 25

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Patronage And Portable Portraits: Early English Miniatures: 1520-1544, Ashley Owens May 2019

Patronage And Portable Portraits: Early English Miniatures: 1520-1544, Ashley Owens

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This thesis examines function and patronage of early sixteenth-century portrait miniatures by Lucas Horenbout (d. 1544) and Hans Holbein the Younger (1497/8-1543). Portrait miniatures, a unique form of portraiture emerging in the sixteenth century, have a long tradition in England, but hold an ambiguous place within art history because of their size, variety, and multifaceted function. Scholarship on the topic of early English portrait miniatures defines and discusses the tradition as it applies to the Elizabethan miniatures of Nicholas Hilliard (1547-1619), the first major English-born artist. Therefore, the miniatures prior to Hilliard have been studied as predecessors to his ...


From Lace To Chains. The Making Of A Print, Alison G. Stewart Apr 2019

From Lace To Chains. The Making Of A Print, Alison G. Stewart

Zea E-Books

How have printed works of art changed over time? Do printmakers today work with the same materials and techniques that printmakers used centuries ago? And does printmaking involve the same motivations, concerns, or methods of distribution today as it did in the past?

These were questions asked by University of Nebraska–Lincoln students in a history of prints class in the School of Art, Art History & Design taught by Hixson-Lied Professor of Art History Alison Stewart during fall semester 2018. For this curatorial project, students selected one set of old master prints (pre-1850) and one modern (post-1850) print from Sheldon ...


Sebald Beham And The Augsburg Printer Niclas Vom Sand: New Documents On Printing And Frankfurt Before 1550, Alison Stewart Jan 2018

Sebald Beham And The Augsburg Printer Niclas Vom Sand: New Documents On Printing And Frankfurt Before 1550, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This essay makes known two unpublished documents from the last years of the life of Sebald Beham (1500 Nuremberg–1550 Frankfurt) and uses them as a means to explore Beham’s relationship to printing, the town of Frankfurt, and the Augsburg printer Niclas vom Sand, who remains an unwritten part of the history of the period. The essay is organized as an autobiographical retrospective by an older man forced in prior decades to move from Nuremberg and seek employment and a new life elsewhere. The end of the essay evaluates the documents and aspects of them.


The Talismanic Seal Stone Of Crete: A Re-Evaluation., Catherine Stram May 2017

The Talismanic Seal Stone Of Crete: A Re-Evaluation., Catherine Stram

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This thesis presents a re-evaluation of the talismanic seal stones of Crete. Its purpose is to present previous scholarship on these seal stones, introduce the reader to a new way of recording and viewing seal stones through Reflectance Transformation Imaging (RTI), and to offer the data from a study on 384 talismanic seal stones.

Seals were small stones or pieces of wood or ivory with intaglio, meaning designs were cut into their surface in order to create a relief when stamped in wet clay or a similar substance. They served several purposes: as identification, as a way of showing ownership ...


Viewing Heaven: Rock Crystal, Reliquaries, And Transparency In Fourteenth-Century Aachen, Claire Kilgore May 2017

Viewing Heaven: Rock Crystal, Reliquaries, And Transparency In Fourteenth-Century Aachen, Claire Kilgore

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This thesis examines reliquaries and objects associated with medieval Christian practice in fourteenth-century Aachen. The city's cathedral and treasury contain prestigious relics, reliquaries, and liturgical items, aided by its status as the Holy Roman Empire's coronation church. During the reign of Holy Roman Emperor Charles IV (r. 1349-1378), reliquaries, pilgrimage, and architecture reflect late medieval interests in vision, optics, and transparency. Two mid-fourteenth century reliquaries from the Aachen Cathedral Treasury, the Reliquary of Charlemagne and the Three-Steepled Reliquary, display relics through rock crystal windows, in contrast to the obscuring characteristics of earlier reliquaries. Not only do the two ...


Shattered Ceilings: Roof Tile Analysis On Survey Archaeology Projects, Rebecca Salem Apr 2017

Shattered Ceilings: Roof Tile Analysis On Survey Archaeology Projects, Rebecca Salem

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

Finding a roof tile on an archaeological survey demonstrates that a structure had previously stood nearby. Rarely found in their entirety, tiles are fabricated from terracotta, which, while durable when in its proper place, breaks when falling from a roof. The nature of these fragmentary finds has made tile analysis limited and tiles are often not included in publications or only a select few are included with ceramic finds. Additionally, unlike pottery with its typographic chronology, roof tiles have restricted dating potential. However, there are several specific types of tile that can greatly help with dating. Though limited, some of ...


The Origins And Identity Of Roman Mithraism, Charles R. Hill Apr 2017

The Origins And Identity Of Roman Mithraism, Charles R. Hill

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This thesis is a reassessment of scholarship concerning the origins of the cult mysteries of Mithraism in its Roman form during the Imperial Period. While much has been published in the debate over the cult’s true origins, we are still left without a satisfactory answer. The present work is an attempt to reconcile some of the arguments posed in the 19th and early 20th centuries with those of the later 20th and 21st centuries, focusing mostly on the cult’s art and iconography in Mithraea, the central spaces of Mithraic worship. First will be a ...


Representing Propaganda: Anti-Tyrannical Art Of The Greek, Roman, And French Populist Agendas, Katherine Norgard May 2016

Representing Propaganda: Anti-Tyrannical Art Of The Greek, Roman, And French Populist Agendas, Katherine Norgard

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

History is often shaped to fit certain agendas. Regular, flawed individuals become heroes and martyrs. The truth is often more complicated, as proven by the fact that Harmodios and Aristogeiton gained their fame by publicly slaughtering a well-liked ruler for encroaching on their pederastic relationship, Brutus gained his fame by murdering Julius Caesar for getting too close to his mother (and sister), and Jean-Paul Marat was exalted and worshiped for violence-inciting journalism.

Harmodios, Brutus, and Jean Paul Marat all serve as symbols of equalitarianism. Their public portrayals were crafted to be symbols that fit the [needs of] revolutionary agendas. As ...


Study Of Northern Renaissance Artist Sebald Beham Through His Printed Works, Anika Zempleni Apr 2016

Study Of Northern Renaissance Artist Sebald Beham Through His Printed Works, Anika Zempleni

UCARE Research Products

Sebald Beham (1500-1550) was a Northern Renaissance artist born in Nuremberg, Germany. His works include woodcuts, engravings, paintings, and designs for stained glass. Most of his works are prints, however. This project focused on gaining a better understanding of the interests, associates, and living locations of Beham, based off of the knowledge that was gained through looking at where his works were printed, and by whom.

Advisor: Alison Stewart


Lucas Cranach's Samson And Delilah In Northern European Art, Jacqueline S. Spackman May 2015

Lucas Cranach's Samson And Delilah In Northern European Art, Jacqueline S. Spackman

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This thesis explores images of Samson and Delilah in northern Europe in the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. My research focuses primarily on Lucas Cranach’s painting, Samson and Delilah of 1528-30, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. By examining prints and decorative artworks that include the Samson and Delilah narrative, it is my goal to understand where Cranach’s painting fits into the larger art historical picture. Through examining the locations and suggested meanings of other works, I hope to establish that it is also possible to understand the intention and meaning behind Cranach’s painting. I ...


Between Historical Truth And Story-Telling: The Twentieth-Century Fabrication Of “Artemisia”, Britiany Daugherty Apr 2015

Between Historical Truth And Story-Telling: The Twentieth-Century Fabrication Of “Artemisia”, Britiany Daugherty

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

This research focuses on the twentieth century rediscovery of the seventeenth-century Italian painter Artemisia Gentileschi by scholars, novelists, playwrights, filmmakers, and artists. I argue that the various authors who told her story constructed two distinct “Artemisias,” what I identify as the “Academic Artemisia” and the “Celebrity Artemisia.” The “Academic Artemisia” results from writings by scholars focused on her 1610 Susanna and the Elders, who used approaches from formalism and connoisseurship, to feminism and iconography. The “Celebrity Artemisia” stems from popular fictions that refashioned the life and art of Artemisia according to pop culture tastes. Studying what has been said about ...


Coelum Britannicum: Inigo Jones And Symbolic Geometry, Rumiko Handa Jan 2015

Coelum Britannicum: Inigo Jones And Symbolic Geometry, Rumiko Handa

Architecture Program: Faculty Scholarly and Creative Activity

Inigo Jones’s interpretation that Stonehenge was a Roman temple of Coelum, the god of the heavens, was published in 1655, 3 years after his death, in The most notable Antiquity of Great Britain, vulgarly called Stone-Heng, on Salisbury Plain, Restored.1 King James I demanded an interpretation in 1620. The task most reasonably fell in the realm of Surveyor of the King’s Works, which Jones had been for the preceding 5 years. According to John Webb, Jones’s assistant since 1628 and executor of Jones’s will, it was Webb who wrote the book based on Jones’s ...


The Artist's Lament In 1528. Exile, Printing, And The Reformation, Alison Stewart Jan 2015

The Artist's Lament In 1528. Exile, Printing, And The Reformation, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

The plight of painters and other artists was not an easy one when the Reformation made inroads into German-speaking lands. Commissions for Catholic subjects and altarpieces dried up as a result of Lutheran influence. Two laments dating from the early Reformation period address the artist's situation. Both are brief, date from 1526 and 1528, and appear in different contexts - one in a letter of introduction and the other in a printed pamphlet. The first concerns the painter Hans Holbein the Younger (1497/98- 1543) whose portraits painted for King Henry VIII and his court indicate that the pictorial genre ...


The Imperial Temple At Antiochia Ad Cragum: Aspects Of Architecture And Iconography, Geraldine S. Dobos Apr 2014

The Imperial Temple At Antiochia Ad Cragum: Aspects Of Architecture And Iconography, Geraldine S. Dobos

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

Along the northeastern Mediterranean shore lies Antiochia ad Cragum, an ancient city located in the western area of the Roman province of Rough Cilicia. It is now known as the village of Guney, in southern Turkey. The Northeast Temple is the first Imperial structure at Antiochia that has been revealed in its entirety and its reconstruction is anticipated. This excavation by the University of Nebraska (Antiochia ad Cragum Archaeological Research Project, or ACARP), is directed by UNL Professor Michael Hoff.

The hypothetical reconstruction of the Northeast Temple’s geison course, which I present, emphasizes certain diagnostic features that may be ...


Society And Style: Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Alison G. Stewart, Paul Royster Jan 2014

Society And Style: Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Alison G. Stewart, Paul Royster

Zea E-Books

This collection of works explores how Societies and Styles changed over the course of Early Modern Europe (1500-1800) from the time of the advent of printing on paper to the Industrial Revolution and beyond through little-seen printed masterpieces from the Sheldon Museum of Art’s collection. Today, “print” continues to endure even as new forms of digital publications transform our world in previously unimaginable ways, just as printing did centuries ago.

This exhibition offers a view into the ways printed works of art on paper (mostly woodcuts, engravings, and etchings) showcase society and its various aspects, ranging from one Christian ...


Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart Jan 2014

Man’S Best Friend? Dogs And Pigs In Early Modern Germany, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

When Jacob Seisenegger and Titian painted individual portraits of Emperor Charles V around 1532, a dog replaced such traditional accouterments of imperial power as crown, scepter, and orb.3 Charles placed one hand on the dog’s collar, a gesture indicating his companion’s noble qualities including faithfulness.4 At the same time, another more down-to-earth meaning for the dog had become prominent in the decades before the imperial portraits: the interest in and ability to eat anything in sight. This pig-like ability resulted in dogs, alongside pigs, becoming emblems of indiscriminate and gluttonous eating and drinking during the early ...


The Mayaarch3d Project: A 3d Webgis For Analyzing Ancient Architecture And Landscapes, Jennifer Von Schwerin, Heather Richards-Rissetto, Fabio Remondino, Giorgio Agugario, Gabrio Girardi Sep 2013

The Mayaarch3d Project: A 3d Webgis For Analyzing Ancient Architecture And Landscapes, Jennifer Von Schwerin, Heather Richards-Rissetto, Fabio Remondino, Giorgio Agugario, Gabrio Girardi

Anthropology Faculty Publications

There is a need in the humanities for a 3D WebGIS with analytical tools that allow researchers to analyze 3D models linked to spatially referenced data. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) allow for complex spatial analysis of 2.5D data. For example, they offer bird’s eye views of landscapes with extruded building footprints, but one cannot ‘get on the ground’ and interact with true 3D models from a pedestrian perspective. Meanwhile, 3D models and virtual environments visualize data in 3D space, but analytical tools are simple rotation or lighting effects. The MayaArch3D Project is developing a 3D WebGIS—called QueryArch3D ...


Zoomorphic Penannular Brooches In 6th And 7th Century Ireland, Esther G. Ward Dec 2012

Zoomorphic Penannular Brooches In 6th And 7th Century Ireland, Esther G. Ward

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

In this thesis the author examines the evolution, manufacture, and societal significance of zoomorphic penannular brooches, a type of metal dress fastener used in early medieval Ireland that is often decorated. The brooches examined are dated to the 6th and 7th centuries, during which the Irish underwent a process of religious conversion from Celtic paganism to Christianity, and social rank was paramount. It is in this social context that the brooches are examined. Despite the significance of this time of social change, brooches from this period tend to be overlooked by scholarship in favor of the more ornate ...


Media Revolution: Early Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Gregory Nosan, Alison G. Stewart Mar 2012

Media Revolution: Early Prints From The Sheldon Museum Of Art, Gregory Nosan, Alison G. Stewart

Zea E-Books

In the digital age, when videos are streamed and books can be read electronically, it is hard to fathom the revolutionary impact that printed images had when they first appeared in Europe around 1400. Their introduction changed forever the traditional practice of manually crafting images one by one, creating a world in which pictures could be reproduced almost without limit on a new material called paper, expanding the possibilities and audiences for images and texts of all kinds. This publication, which brings to light little-seen masterpieces from the Sheldon Museum of Art’s collection, explores the three major print techniques ...


Review Of Fauvel. The First Archaeologist In Athens And His Philhellenic Correspondents, By C. W. Clairmont, Effie Athanassopoulos Nov 2011

Review Of Fauvel. The First Archaeologist In Athens And His Philhellenic Correspondents, By C. W. Clairmont, Effie Athanassopoulos

Anthropology Faculty Publications

Clairmont’s book is a selection of letters addressed to Louis-François-Sébastien Fauvel, the French Consul and antiquarian, who lived in Athens from 1803 to 1822. Fauvel came to Greece for the first time in 1780. He was sent to the Orient by Count Choiseul-Gouffier in order to study, draw and acquire antiquities for Choiseul’s collection. In 1784 Choiseul-Gouffier was appointed Ambassador in Constantinople and Fauvel continued his activities as a member of Choiseul’s retinue until 1792. Subsequently, Fauvel held the position of French Consul in Athens from 1802 until 1833. With the outbreak of the War of Independence ...


Euergetism And Gift-Giving At Eleusis: A Case Study Of Ancient Patronage Structures, Bailey E. Barnard Apr 2011

Euergetism And Gift-Giving At Eleusis: A Case Study Of Ancient Patronage Structures, Bailey E. Barnard

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

The giving and interchange of gifts, otherwise known as reciprocity or gift-giving, was a pervasive principle and practice in ancient Greek society, manifested in nearly all aspects of life. In particular, reciprocity was at the heart of patronage systems influencing religious gift-giving and civic works. This study focuses on one such system of patronage known as euergetism, in which wealthy individuals voluntarily donated funds for public facilities as munificent gifts to the city public. The traditional belief is that euergetism, emerging in the early Hellenistic period, was a sudden departure from previous patronage traditions, born out of economic necessity when ...


Sebald Beham (From The Exhibition Catalogue Die Gottlosen Maler Von Nürnberg, Alison Stewart Jan 2011

Sebald Beham (From The Exhibition Catalogue Die Gottlosen Maler Von Nürnberg, Alison Stewart

Faculty Publications and Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

The prints of Sebald Beham, and his brother Barthel, were the subject of a recent exhibition titled Gottlosen Maler or Godless Painters at the Albrecht-Dürer-Haus in Nuremberg, Germany (March 3-July 3, 2011), where this essay was included in the exhibition’s catalogue in German. The essay addresses the biography and historiography of the “godless painter” Sebald Beham, a pupil of Albrecht Dürer, who received the nickname "godless painter" because of his radical pronouncements in Reformation Nuremberg when the town was on the eve of becoming Lutheran. The essay argues that Beham should be viewed as a highly creative and productive ...


The Art Of Printmaking: Part 1. The Tools And Techniques Of The Printmaker, Norman Geske Jan 1966

The Art Of Printmaking: Part 1. The Tools And Techniques Of The Printmaker, Norman Geske

Sheldon Museum of Art Catalogues and Publications

There are four major techniques for making original prints. A brief descriptlon of each of these -- relief processes, incised processes, planographic processes, and stencil processes -- is found in the following paragraphs.

Most art museums today seek the means of reaching a wider public than is actually counted through the turnstile and, as a result, art objects have come to be a commonplace in public places of all kinds, civic and commercial. Art has even taken to the road in circulating exhibitions, art-mobiles and the like. The present series of exhibitions has been organized as an effort in this direction, to ...


The Art Of Printmaking: Part 2. Master Prints From The Fifteenth Through The Eighteenth Centuries, Norman A. Geske Jan 1966

The Art Of Printmaking: Part 2. Master Prints From The Fifteenth Through The Eighteenth Centuries, Norman A. Geske

Sheldon Museum of Art Catalogues and Publications

SCHONGAUER, MARTIN
ALDEGREVER, HEINRICH
ALTDORFER, ALBRECHT
BALDUNG-GRIEN, HANS
BEHAM, BARTHEL
CRANACH, LUCAS
DURER, ALBRECHT
DUVET, JEAN
HOLBEIN, HANS
LAUTENSACK, HANS SEBALD
VAN LEYDEN, LUCAS
MANTEGNA, ANDREA
BOSSE, ABRAHAM
CALLOT, JACQUES
CARRACCI, AGOSTINO
GELLEE, CLAUDE (called Lorrain)
GOLTZIUS, HENDRIK
NANTEUIL, ROBERT
VAN RIJN, REMBRANDT HARMENSZ
CANAL, ANTONIO (called Canaletto)
HOGARTH, WILLIAM
MOREAU, JEAN-MICHEL (known as Moreau Ie Jeune)
PIRANESI, GIOVANNI BATTISTA




Mont-Saint-Michel And Chartres, Henry Adams, Ralph Adams Cram Jan 1904

Mont-Saint-Michel And Chartres, Henry Adams, Ralph Adams Cram

Electronic Texts in American Studies

FROM the moment when, through the courtesy of my friend Barrett Wendell, I came first to know Mr. Henry Adams's book, MontSaint- Michel and Chartres, I was profoundly convinced that this privately printed, jealously guarded volume should be withdrawn from its hiding-place amongst the bibliographical treasures of collectors and amateurs and given that wide publicity demanded alike by its intrinsic nature and the cause it could so admirably serve. To say that the book was a revelation is inadequately to express a fact; at once all the theology, philosophy, and mysticism, the politics, sociology, and economics, the romance, literature ...