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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Microcosms: An Examination Of Insects In 17th-Century Dutch Still Lifes, Olivia Carlson Jul 2019

Microcosms: An Examination Of Insects In 17th-Century Dutch Still Lifes, Olivia Carlson

Scholarly Horizons: University of Minnesota, Morris Undergraduate Journal

There are many 17th-century Dutch flower still life paintings, and if you pass by one quickly during a visit at a museum, you may see nothing more than a bouquet of arranged flowers. But if you stop at one and look long enough, you will find visual treats that would have been missed when only glancing at the piece. Maybe you’d see the careful composition, or perhaps a shell or a figurine. Most often, however, you will discover insects; some are hidden in the bouquet, and some are very prominently displayed on top of the flowers or on a ...


Economic Underpinning Of Renaissance Italian Art, Katherine Jacobson Apr 2014

Economic Underpinning Of Renaissance Italian Art, Katherine Jacobson

Undergraduate Research Symposium 2014

In 1902, art historian, Aby Warburg, asserted that in Renaissance Italy, "works of art owed their making to the mutual understanding between patrons and artists. The works were, from the outset, the results of a negotiation between client and executant". This research seeks to examine patronage relationships in the context of politically fragmented Renaissance Italy to further our understanding of art's ability to promote political, ideological, or religious agendas. By referencing renowned works of art from the Italian Renaissance, I attempt to identify the significance of using culture and art as a rhetorical tool, rather than other more direct ...


Sex, Lies And Anecdotes: Gender Relations In The Life Stories Of Italian Women Artists, 1550-1800, Julia K. Dabbs Jan 2005

Sex, Lies And Anecdotes: Gender Relations In The Life Stories Of Italian Women Artists, 1550-1800, Julia K. Dabbs

Art History Publications

The writer discusses gender relations in life stories of Italian women artists between 1550 and 1800. In early modern life stories, a recurring emphasis on gender relations, typically deflecting or overshadowing discussion of artistic accomplishment, clearly marks the female artist as a breed apart from her male colleagues. In light of the fact that their biographers were frequently artists themselves, or at least were linked to artistic circles, the commonalities of these anecdotal narratives illuminate how these “miracles of nature” were viewed by the male artistic community, and, by association, the broader society of which they were a part. The ...