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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

The Spatial Agency Of The Catacombs: An Analysis Of The Interventions Of Damasus I (305-384), Natalie A. Hall Aug 2018

The Spatial Agency Of The Catacombs: An Analysis Of The Interventions Of Damasus I (305-384), Natalie A. Hall

Theses and Dissertations

Damasus I (305-384) ascended to the office of the Bishop of Rome after a bitter and bloody battle with Ursinus in 366 CE. The violence was a culmination of doctrinal squabbles and power contests which erupted in the Roman church over the course of the fourth century. Damasus engaged in a substantial program of physical renovation and enlargement of martyr sites and personally penned numerous epigrams both extolling the virtue of the honored dead and the patronage of the bishopric. Scholarship related to Damasus and his works is typically narrowly focused, considering motive(s) for his actions, his use of ...


Dinner, Daniel Reuben Baskin May 2017

Dinner, Daniel Reuben Baskin

Theses and Dissertations

Dinner is an interactive exhibition which presents appropriated works of art collected and hung in a clustered salon style, as well as a fully realized recreation based on a 16th century Dutch banquet still-life, which presents guests with meats, cheeses, fruits, vegetables, breads, and wine to share and imbibe. Dining ware is provided for guests at the entrance to the exhibit, as are suggested topics of conversation, which are presented on slips of paper for guests to carry with them throughout their time in the space. Within the collection of wall-mounted works are references to ancient Greek and Roman marble ...


Restoring The Gothic: The Fate Of Medieval Cathedrals In A Divided Germany, 1945 - Present, Haley Walton May 2017

Restoring The Gothic: The Fate Of Medieval Cathedrals In A Divided Germany, 1945 - Present, Haley Walton

Architecture Undergraduate Honors Theses

At the end of World War II, Germany faced some of the greatest levels of destruction of any country in Europe, leaving their historic cities and iconic architecture in ruin. Across the country, some monuments were restored with the upmost attention to detail, while others were maintained in a state of rubble for decades. Following the 1949 division of the state into West Germany (a democratic republic) and East Germany (a socialist autocracy), most of the rebuilding took place against the backdrop of strong ideological differences. But the two new nations shared a centuries-long history, and, after rehabilitating basic infrastructure ...


Exploring The Contemporary Use And Understanding Of Precedent In Architectural Design Via A Comparative Analysis Of Brunelleschi And Le Corbusier, Shaelyn J. Vinson May 2016

Exploring The Contemporary Use And Understanding Of Precedent In Architectural Design Via A Comparative Analysis Of Brunelleschi And Le Corbusier, Shaelyn J. Vinson

Architecture Undergraduate Honors Theses

Abstract

As a student of architecture, conducting precedent research before diving into the design phase of a project is something that I am very familiar with. But, following each project’s precedent research, is often an overwhelming feeling of uselessness for the material found. For each project, assignments call for students to find a certain number of buildings on which to base their project. While historically this step makes sense, 21st-century architecture students are taught that there is no “new” architecture, and that copying and collaging together existing buildings is the best way to achieve a successful design ...


Visceral Space: Dissection And Michelangelo's Architecture, Chloe Costello May 2015

Visceral Space: Dissection And Michelangelo's Architecture, Chloe Costello

Architecture Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis focuses on the architectural work of Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti, who, perhaps, is better known for his painting and sculpture than for his architecture. Nevertheless, his buildings are revered by architectural historians, such as James Ackerman, for their mimicry of bodily motion and emotion. Under the influence of Renaissance humanism, it was not uncommon for architects to validate their designs by reference to the human body, for example, basing the dimensions of a basilica on ideal bodily proportions. But, Michelangelo's approach in his earliest architectural designs, such as the Medici Chapel (1521-1524) and the Laurentian Library (1523-1525 ...


The Unsettling Landscape: Landscape And Anxiety In The Garden Of The House Of Octavius Quartio, Sarah Brutesco Jan 2007

The Unsettling Landscape: Landscape And Anxiety In The Garden Of The House Of Octavius Quartio, Sarah Brutesco

Inquiry: The University of Arkansas Undergraduate Research Journal

Ancient Roman houses (domus) were both public and private spaces and were used by the homeowner (dominus) to send messages of power to his guests and family members. Scholarly analysis of the rhetorical power of the architecture and decoration of the domus has largely overlooked the role of the garden within this context. It is generally assumed that the purpose of the garden was to provide a calm green space in the center of an urban home. The purpose of this paper is to challenge this overly simplistic reading of Roman gardens and to explore how the dominus might have ...


Development Of Gendered Space: The Archaic And Classical Greek Temple, Callie Williams Jan 2006

Development Of Gendered Space: The Archaic And Classical Greek Temple, Callie Williams

Inquiry: The University of Arkansas Undergraduate Research Journal

Throughout the ancient Greek world, temples marked the landscape as a sign of Greek civilization. Although Greek temples hare been examined, described, and catalogued scientifically since archaeology came of age in the 18th century, the question of their cultural significance in their original Greek context has vet to be fully answered. Many twentieth-century interpreters tended to yoke the history of Greek temples to narratives of modernism, resulting in anachronistic conclusions. Current trends in architectural history have begun to test other interpretative strategies, such as the interrelationship between architecture and the emergence of Greek philosophy. This essay explores the possibilities of ...


Lucas Van Leyden's Dance Around The Golden Calf: The Northern Triptych In The Age Of The Reformation, Jennifer R. Pease Jan 2006

Lucas Van Leyden's Dance Around The Golden Calf: The Northern Triptych In The Age Of The Reformation, Jennifer R. Pease

Inquiry: The University of Arkansas Undergraduate Research Journal

This paper focuses on Lucas van Leyden's 1530 triptych Dance Around the Golden Calf. It is shown through a stylistic and iconographic analysis of the painting that it is a piece reflective of the tensions and upheaval prevalent during the Reformation-era society in which it was produced. This was a time when Northern European artists such as Lucas began an increase in secularism in their work, demonstrating the dawn of a new era in the church. Lucas effectively uses visual contradiction and psychological implication to respond artistically to the tumultuous age of the Reformation.