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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Negotiating Julio-Claudian Memory: The Vespasianic Building Program And The Representation Of Imperial Power In Ancient Rome, Joseph V. Frankl May 2014

Negotiating Julio-Claudian Memory: The Vespasianic Building Program And The Representation Of Imperial Power In Ancient Rome, Joseph V. Frankl

Classics Honors Projects

In 70 C.E., the general Vespasian became the emperor of the Roman world. His accession marked the end of a year-long civil war and the beginning of the second imperial dynasty. The legitimacy of his rule depended on addressing the memory of his predecessors, the Julio-Claudian dynasty. This paper examines expressions of Vespasian’s relationship with the Julio-Claudians as evident in the emperor’s public buildings in Rome. The form, location, and symbolism of five structures that constituted Vespasian’s building program will be considered. These buildings utilized several modes for interacting with the past including: condemning some Julio-Claudian ...


Being Seen: An Art Historical And Statistical Analysis Of Feminized Worship In Early Modern Rome, Olivia J. Belote Apr 2011

Being Seen: An Art Historical And Statistical Analysis Of Feminized Worship In Early Modern Rome, Olivia J. Belote

History Honors Projects

Female saints in early Christianity found their place in public veneration often through violent means, martyrdom. These saints, while publicly suffering in the imitation of Christ, were the original agents to navigate the gendered hierarchy within the religion. Female saints created an avenue for later female worshippers to understand Christianity on a strictly feminine level. Through the frescoed depictions of these female saints in 18 churches throughout Rome, this paper historically and statistically analyzes how the artistic representations of female saints added to or created a space for feminized worship.


From Pagan To Christian: An Archaeological Study Of The Transformation Of Corinth In Late Antiquity, Eli J. Weaverdyck May 2007

From Pagan To Christian: An Archaeological Study Of The Transformation Of Corinth In Late Antiquity, Eli J. Weaverdyck

Classics Honors Projects

This thesis examines the process by which Christianity became the dominant religion of Corinth as evidenced in the archaeological record. I compare the evidence in Corinth to historical evidence for the Eastern Roman Empire, including imperial legislation and evidence for Christianization in five other eastern cities. I conclude that, in order for Christianity to supplant paganism as the dominant religion in ancient society, it had to accept many of the institutions and traditions of paganism. My investigation of the archaeological evidence in Corinth, specifically the monumental architecture, the sculpture, and the cemeteries, reveals the same phenomenon in Corinth.