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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Sign And Image: Representations Of Plants On The Warka Vase Of Early Mesopotamia, Naomi F. Miller, Philip Jones, Holly Pittman Jan 2016

Sign And Image: Representations Of Plants On The Warka Vase Of Early Mesopotamia, Naomi F. Miller, Philip Jones, Holly Pittman

University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology Papers

The Warka Vase is an iconic artifact of Mesopotamia. In the absence of rigorous botanical study, the plants depicted on the lowest register are usually thought to be flax and grain. This analysis of the image identified as grain argues that its botanical characteristics, iconographical context and similarity to an archaic sign found in proto-writing demonstrates that it should be identified as a date palm sapling. It confirms the identification of flax. The correct identification of the plants furthers our understanding of possible symbolic continuities spanning the centuries that saw the codification of text as a representation of natural language.


Leaves That Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments From Northeast China, Sarah Laursen May 2011

Leaves That Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments From Northeast China, Sarah Laursen

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Over the last fifty years, rich finds of gold objects have been uncovered in China’s northeastern Liaoning province. These tombs belonged to a tribe of steppe nomads called the Murong Xianbei who settled north of the Great Wall during the Han dynasty and established a succession of short-lived states called Yan that ruled parts of Northeast Asia during the third to fifth centuries CE. Until now, the history of the Murong and the rapidly emerging field of Murong archaeology have been published almost exclusively in Chinese. This dissertation seeks to rectify the lack of Western scholarship about this unique ...