Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Assur Is King Of Persia: Illustrations Of The Book Of Esther In Some Nineteenth-Century Sources, Steven W. Holloway Jan 2009

Assur Is King Of Persia: Illustrations Of The Book Of Esther In Some Nineteenth-Century Sources, Steven W. Holloway

Libraries

The marriage of archaeological referencing and picture Bibles in the nineteenth century resulted in an astonishing variety of guises worn by the court of Ahasuerus in Esther. Following the exhibition of Neo-Assyrian sculpture in the British Museum and the wide circulation of such images in various John Murray publications, British illustrators like Henry Anelay defaulted to Assyrian models for kings and rulers in the Old Testament, including the principal actors in Esther, even though authentic Achaemenid Persian art had been available for illustrative pastiche for decades. This curious adoptive choice echoed British national pride in its splendid British Museum collection ...


Russian Icons And American Money, 1928-1938, Wendy Salmond Jan 2009

Russian Icons And American Money, 1928-1938, Wendy Salmond

Art Faculty Articles and Research

The article explores the marketing tactics and consumer expectations with regards to icons released in the street markets and provincial cities of Soviet Russia and acquired by American collectors from 1928-1938. These icons, including those from Byzantium in the tenth century, were seen as cultural commodities during the Russian revolution and the subsequent socialist construction. The Soviet apparatus Antikvariat was tasked with appraising the icon collections held by the Gosmuzeifond or the State Museum Reserve for exports.


"Who Would Believe What We Have Heard?": Christian Spirituality And Images From The Passion In Religious Art Of New Spain, June-Ann Greeley Jan 2009

"Who Would Believe What We Have Heard?": Christian Spirituality And Images From The Passion In Religious Art Of New Spain, June-Ann Greeley

Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Faculty Publications

The colonial art of New Spain/Mexico provides the viewer with a locus of examination into the robust Christianity that emerged over time out of a native spirituality newly laden with the contours and images from the Old World theology of late medieval/early Catholic Reformation Spain. Franciscan and especially Jesuit missionaries, impelled by a devotional zealotry, championed an apocalyptic vision of hope and suff ering that was well suited for artistic expression. Religious art, whether or not patronized by European colonizers, became an instrument for the missionaries to teach and for the native artists to interrogate religious doctrine, and ...