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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Assur Is King Of Persia: Illustrations Of The Book Of Esther In Some Nineteenth-Century Sources, Steven W. Holloway Jan 2009

Assur Is King Of Persia: Illustrations Of The Book Of Esther In Some Nineteenth-Century Sources, Steven W. Holloway

Libraries

The marriage of archaeological referencing and picture Bibles in the nineteenth century resulted in an astonishing variety of guises worn by the court of Ahasuerus in Esther. Following the exhibition of Neo-Assyrian sculpture in the British Museum and the wide circulation of such images in various John Murray publications, British illustrators like Henry Anelay defaulted to Assyrian models for kings and rulers in the Old Testament, including the principal actors in Esther, even though authentic Achaemenid Persian art had been available for illustrative pastiche for decades. This curious adoptive choice echoed British national pride in its splendid British Museum collection ...


Representations Of The Antonine Empresses On The Nymphaeum In Olympia, Rachel Meyers Jan 2009

Representations Of The Antonine Empresses On The Nymphaeum In Olympia, Rachel Meyers

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Although sculpted portraits often receive more scholarly attention than the statue bodies they were set into, the different types of statue bodies can reveal more information about the portrait statue as a whole. This paper examines the Nymphaeum in Olympia, a monument which originally included an impressive array of statues of the imperial family as well as the family of its commissioner, Herodes Atticus. By analyzing the statue type of each individual represented, I show that, although the male members of the imperial family may be easily distinguished from those of Herodes’ family according to the type of clothing worn ...


"Who Would Believe What We Have Heard?": Christian Spirituality And Images From The Passion In Religious Art Of New Spain, June-Ann Greeley Jan 2009

"Who Would Believe What We Have Heard?": Christian Spirituality And Images From The Passion In Religious Art Of New Spain, June-Ann Greeley

Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies Faculty Publications

The colonial art of New Spain/Mexico provides the viewer with a locus of examination into the robust Christianity that emerged over time out of a native spirituality newly laden with the contours and images from the Old World theology of late medieval/early Catholic Reformation Spain. Franciscan and especially Jesuit missionaries, impelled by a devotional zealotry, championed an apocalyptic vision of hope and suff ering that was well suited for artistic expression. Religious art, whether or not patronized by European colonizers, became an instrument for the missionaries to teach and for the native artists to interrogate religious doctrine, and ...


The Three-Figured Reliefs: Copies Or Neoattic Creations?, Peter E. Nulton Ph.D. Dec 2008

The Three-Figured Reliefs: Copies Or Neoattic Creations?, Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

The well-known group of four three-figured reliefs, existing in several copies and once assigned to the Altar of Pity in Athens, has always eluded interpretation as a coherent iconographical program. The four scenes depicted are Orpheus and Eurydice, Herakles in the garden of the Hesperides, Herakles with Perithoos and Theseus, and Medea with the Peliads. Though some have questioned the association of the reliefs with the Altar, the conventional dating has not been challenged, in spite of the growing recognition that some of the pieces (most notably the Orpheus relief) are largely unparalleled in the Classical Greek idiom. Careful reexamination ...