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Articles 1 - 27 of 27

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things, Sarah Adcock Aug 2019

Children Shouldn't Play With Dead Things, Sarah Adcock

Graduate School of Art Theses

I view my creative process as alchemy, the transformation of materials through experimentation. I use wax as a material that transcends its historical use as a sculptural process for casting and instead, use it for its transmutable qualities to inform content. Because of its plasticity and duality as fragile and resilient, wax is symbolically submissive and assertive. By applying heat, wax can be molded and formed into new shapes. Once it cools, wax reverts back to its natural state; solid and impermeable. I use objects to explore desires of origin and life. Transitional objects, the first “me not me” possession ...


Treehouses: Civilizing The Wildness Of Men And Nature, Courtney Mckinney May 2018

Treehouses: Civilizing The Wildness Of Men And Nature, Courtney Mckinney

English Undergraduate Distinction Projects

In this paper, I explore how treehouses operate symbolically in tandem with culture. Through an analysis of British and American print culture, I argue that the treehouse building project became bound to boyhood at the turn of the twentieth century as the naturalist movement spread and youth organizations embraced treehouses as part of their vision for the development of boys. Parents and youth leaders intend for treehouse projects to build self-reliance, independence, imagination, and courage in their boys. Congruously, this activity associated with a child’s personal growth takes place in an actual growing organism. I analyze how treehouses juxtapose ...


The Knights Templar’S Economic Empire And The Images That Supported It, Laura Remien Woldt Apr 2018

The Knights Templar’S Economic Empire And The Images That Supported It, Laura Remien Woldt

Senior Theses

Today the Knights Templar are known through a swirl of history and conspiracy. The Order of the Temple grew far beyond its original purpose, to reclaim the Holy Land and to protect pilgrims, becoming a banking, financial, and trade giant. The Knights Templars built innovative financial systems, along with a network of monasteries and churches, not only to support the crusades in the Holy Land, but to build, expand, and maintain their empire through the re-working of traditional European art forms to create a particular image of power and piety for both their patrons and enemies.


Gothic Ecclesiastical Architecture Of Northern France: Where Art Meets Economics, Celia R. Woldt Apr 2018

Gothic Ecclesiastical Architecture Of Northern France: Where Art Meets Economics, Celia R. Woldt

Senior Theses

Gothic cathedrals were financed in many ways and their building could take centuries to complete. The process was long and arduous costing enormous sums of money over a sustained period of time. Their construction depleted both capital and skilled labor from the surrounding areas spurring both the donors and workers to be represented in the cathedral. The materials used to build these massive structures drew greatly on the region and dictated their architectural form. When the donors, religious figures, aristocracy, and workers are represented it validates the sacrifices they made towards building the cathedral as well as showing their social ...


Testimonies Of Violence: Images Of Franciscan Martyrs In The Provinces Of New Spain, Emmanuel Ortega Jul 2017

Testimonies Of Violence: Images Of Franciscan Martyrs In The Provinces Of New Spain, Emmanuel Ortega

Art & Art History ETDs

In the middle of the eighteenth century, Franciscan martyr portraits became popular in monastic spaces of the Spanish viceroyalties of central Mexico. To visually construct the meritorious life of these martyrs, artists drew inspiration from hagiographic chronicles that described various Native rebellions, which featured the graphic depiction of the gruesome deaths of friars. The prospect of martyrdom enticed novices to follow in their footsteps in service to God, but also to the Crown, whose presence in the northern territories of New Spain intensified during the period of the Bourbon reforms. In my dissertation I explore this propagandistic approach to martyr ...


Hell In Hand: Fear And Hope In The Hellmouths Of The Hours Of Catherine Of Cleves, Stephanie Lish May 2017

Hell In Hand: Fear And Hope In The Hellmouths Of The Hours Of Catherine Of Cleves, Stephanie Lish

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

This paper is an attempt to investigate how well the borders and miniatures of The Hours of Catherine of Cleves facilitated the method of meditation recommended by Gerard Zerbolt of Zutphen and therefore was a useful tool in Catherine’s search for eternal salvation.


Violence Against Architecture: The Lost Cultural Heritage Of Syria And Iraq, Heidi James Fisher Feb 2017

Violence Against Architecture: The Lost Cultural Heritage Of Syria And Iraq, Heidi James Fisher

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This thesis examines ancient architecture within Syria and Iraq that has been deliberately destroyed by violence. The act of destroying architecture and monuments in both Syria and Iraq, which is often-historical UNESCO protected, will invariably violate various laws, such as the 1954 Hague Convention or the Rome Statute. Since post-2011 Syria, all of humanity has been shocked by continuous warfare that, in addition to causing untold loss of human life and suffering, has included a series of episodes of violence against architecture, all of which is so egregious that foreign governments and non government organizations are constantly engaged in efforts ...


Ashes In Bethel: Bearings Of Second Millennium Bce Ugaritic Mythology Upon First Millennium Bce Israelite Religion, Taylor Thomas Aug 2016

Ashes In Bethel: Bearings Of Second Millennium Bce Ugaritic Mythology Upon First Millennium Bce Israelite Religion, Taylor Thomas

Chancellor’s Honors Program Projects

No abstract provided.


Roman Archaism In Depictions Of Apollo In The Augustan Period, Alisha Sanders May 2016

Roman Archaism In Depictions Of Apollo In The Augustan Period, Alisha Sanders

Honors Projects

At the end of the first century BCE, in order to spread the values and concepts that he wanted to perpetuate in his new political order, Augustus Caesar revived an archaistic art style based on that of the archaic period of ancient Greece. It was in this time that the Roman Empire was being established, and Augustus was taking sole power of the Roman world. This study is focused on works that include depictions of Apollo because one of the first and most studied examples of Augustus’s use of Roman archaism was the decorative program of the Temple of ...


Cats And Dogs: The Development Of The Household Pet Through Symbolic Interpretations And Social Practices In The Middle Ages And Renaissance, Lindsey Nicole Blair Jan 2016

Cats And Dogs: The Development Of The Household Pet Through Symbolic Interpretations And Social Practices In The Middle Ages And Renaissance, Lindsey Nicole Blair

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

Cats and dogs are perhaps the most ubiquitous and consistently represented animals throughout documented human history. Forms of the respective species have roamed the earth for millions of years; however, cats and dogs have held different societal positions ranging from exalted deities to pests. The shifting attitudes and social practices between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Western Europe fostered the reexamination of the relationship between humans and animals. Dogs – and later cats – were the earliest animals to be allowed occupancy inside the medieval house solely to serve utilitarian needs. The development of the modern day concept of the ...


Performing Conquest And Resistance In The Streets Of Eighteenth Century Potosí: Identity And Artifice In The Cityscapes Of Gaspar Miguel De Berrío And Melchor Pérez De Holguín, Agnieszka A. Ficek Dec 2015

Performing Conquest And Resistance In The Streets Of Eighteenth Century Potosí: Identity And Artifice In The Cityscapes Of Gaspar Miguel De Berrío And Melchor Pérez De Holguín, Agnieszka A. Ficek

School of Arts & Sciences Theses

This thesis examines the ways in which Potosí's two most influential colonial artists represented the urban dynamics of race, class and labor in their depictions of the Andean 'City of Silver' during the eighteenth century, when silver production, profits and population were dramatically declining.


“The Bedroom And The Barnyard: Zoomorphic Lust Through Territory, Procedure, And Shelter In ‘The Miller’S Tale’” & Haunchebones, Danielle N. Byington May 2015

“The Bedroom And The Barnyard: Zoomorphic Lust Through Territory, Procedure, And Shelter In ‘The Miller’S Tale’” & Haunchebones, Danielle N. Byington

Undergraduate Honors Theses

“The Bedroom and the Barnyard: Zoomorphic Lust Through Territory, Procedure, and Shelter in ‘The Miller’s Tale’” is an academic endeavor that takes Chaucer’s zoomorphic metaphors and similes and analyzes them in a sense that reveals the chaos of what is human and what is animal tendency. The academic work is expressed in the adjunct creative project, Haunchebones, a 10-minute drama that echoes the tale and its zoomorphic influences, while presenting the content in a stylized play influenced by Theatre of the Absurd and artwork from the medieval and early renaissance period.


Visceral Space: Dissection And Michelangelo's Architecture, Chloe Costello May 2015

Visceral Space: Dissection And Michelangelo's Architecture, Chloe Costello

Architecture Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis focuses on the architectural work of Renaissance master Michelangelo Buonarroti, who, perhaps, is better known for his painting and sculpture than for his architecture. Nevertheless, his buildings are revered by architectural historians, such as James Ackerman, for their mimicry of bodily motion and emotion. Under the influence of Renaissance humanism, it was not uncommon for architects to validate their designs by reference to the human body, for example, basing the dimensions of a basilica on ideal bodily proportions. But, Michelangelo's approach in his earliest architectural designs, such as the Medici Chapel (1521-1524) and the Laurentian Library (1523-1525 ...


The Matter Of Jerusalem: The Holy Land In Angevin Court Culture And Identity, C. 1154-1216, Katherine Lee Hodges-Kluck May 2015

The Matter Of Jerusalem: The Holy Land In Angevin Court Culture And Identity, C. 1154-1216, Katherine Lee Hodges-Kluck

Doctoral Dissertations

This dissertation reshapes our understanding of the mechanics of nation-building and the construction of national identities in the Middle Ages, placing medieval England in a wider European and Mediterranean context. I argue that a coherent English national identity, transcending the social and linguistic differences of the post-Norman Conquest period, took shape at the end of the twelfth century. A vital component of this process was the development of an ideology that intimately connected the geography, peoples, and mythical histories of England and the Holy Land. Proponents of this ideology envisioned England as an allegorical new Jerusalem inhabited by a chosen ...


Inspiring Piety: The Influence Of Caravaggio’S Paintings In Santa Maria Del Popolo, Cara Coleman Jan 2015

Inspiring Piety: The Influence Of Caravaggio’S Paintings In Santa Maria Del Popolo, Cara Coleman

Williams Honors College, Honors Research Projects

This article looks at the way Italian Baroque painter, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio broke from the artistic conventions of the Renaissance and Mannerist styles in his religious paintings to create an entirely new style that reflected the needs of the post-Tridentine Catholic Church. Caravaggio pushed painting throughout Europe in a new direction, away from the idealization of the Renaissance and the artistic extremes of Mannerism, by popularizing realism in art. Caravaggio’s unique style is examined through comparisons of his paintings, The Conversion of Paul, c.1601 and The Martyrdom of Saint Peter, c.1601 in the Roman basilica, Santa ...


Making History: How Art Museums In The French Revolution Crafted A National Identity, 1789-1799, Anna E. Sido Jan 2015

Making History: How Art Museums In The French Revolution Crafted A National Identity, 1789-1799, Anna E. Sido

Scripps Senior Theses

This paper compares two art museums, both created during the French Revolution, that fostered national unity by promoting a cultural identity. By analyzing the use of preexisting architecture from the ancien régime, innovative displays of art and redefinitions of the museum visitor as an Enlightened citizen, this thesis explores the application of eighteenth-century philosophy to the formation of two museums. The first is the Musée Central des Arts in the Louvre and the second is the Musée des Monuments Français, both housed in buildings taken over by the Revolutionary government and present the seized property of the royal family and ...


The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore Aug 2014

The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore

Honors Program Theses

Geoffrey Chaucer's dream poem The House of Fame explores virtual technologies of memory and reading, which are similar to the themes explored in Danielewski's House of Leaves. "[ftaires!]", apart from referencing the anecdotal (and humorous) misspelling of "stairs" in House of Leaves, is one such linguistically and visually informed phenomenon that speaks directly to how we think about, and give remembrance to, our own digital and textual culture. This paper posits that graphic design, illustrations, and other textual cues (such as the [ftaires!] mispelling in House of Leaves] have a subtle yet powerful psychological influence on our reading ...


Tundale’S Vision: Socialization In 12th Century Ireland, Michael W. Deike May 2014

Tundale’S Vision: Socialization In 12th Century Ireland, Michael W. Deike

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The purpose of this project is to explore the historical image of Hell in Medieval Europe as an agent of socialization for illiterate Christian communities. The project focuses on a literary work, Tundale’s Vision, written in 1149 C.E in Cashel, Ireland. Tundale’s Vision came from a genre of vision literature derived from popular oracular folk tradition surrounding the image of Hell that served the purpose of socializing Christian communities to certain social norms and stigmas presented by the author. Vision literature would be used by preachers in vernacular sermons throughout the Medieval period in order to reinforce ...


Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory Apr 2014

Storytelling In Bronze: The Doors Of The Baptistery Of San Giovanni As Emblems Of Florence's Roman History And Artistic Progression, Erin M. Gregory

Undergraduate Honors Theses

The three bronze doors of the Baptistery of San Giovanni stand as public expressions of Florence’s imperial history, economic stability, and artistic advances. These commissions can only be understood in their physical context within the Baptistery, the city’s most revered monument. The Baptistery testifies to Florence’s imperial Roman and early Christian history, and it serves vital religious and civic functions within the commune. Each bronze door guards the liminal space between the city’s public sphere and the sacred interior where the baptismal ritual is performed. The bronze medium and the narrative style of the doors further ...


A Spectacle Of Great Beauty: The Changing Faces Of Hagia Sophia, Victoria M. Villano May 2012

A Spectacle Of Great Beauty: The Changing Faces Of Hagia Sophia, Victoria M. Villano

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


An Architectural Reflection Of Community : A Study Of The Patriarchal Churches In Constnatinople/Istanbul As A Reflection Of The Relationship Of Christians And Muslims In The Ottoman Empire, Greta Steeber Jan 2012

An Architectural Reflection Of Community : A Study Of The Patriarchal Churches In Constnatinople/Istanbul As A Reflection Of The Relationship Of Christians And Muslims In The Ottoman Empire, Greta Steeber

Master of Arts Theses

No abstract provided.


Binding Ochre To Theory, Simone E. Nibbs Jan 2012

Binding Ochre To Theory, Simone E. Nibbs

Pomona Senior Theses

Widely found throughout the archaeological and artistic records in capacities ranging from burial contexts to early evidence of artistic expression, red ochre has been studied in archaeological and art conservationist communities for decades. Despite this, literature discussing binders is disparate and often absent from accessible arenas. Red ochre is important historically because its use can be used to help further the understanding of early humans, their predecessors, and their cognitive capabilities. However, there is not much written speculation on the processes involved in binder selection, collection, and processing. Based on the idea of these three activities associated with binders, I ...


Leaves That Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments From Northeast China, Sarah Laursen May 2011

Leaves That Sway: Gold Xianbei Cap Ornaments From Northeast China, Sarah Laursen

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

Over the last fifty years, rich finds of gold objects have been uncovered in China’s northeastern Liaoning province. These tombs belonged to a tribe of steppe nomads called the Murong Xianbei who settled north of the Great Wall during the Han dynasty and established a succession of short-lived states called Yan that ruled parts of Northeast Asia during the third to fifth centuries CE. Until now, the history of the Murong and the rapidly emerging field of Murong archaeology have been published almost exclusively in Chinese. This dissertation seeks to rectify the lack of Western scholarship about this unique ...


With Sleep Comes A Fusion Of Worlds: The Seven Sleepers Of Ephesus Through Formation And Transformation, Gwendolyn Collaco Jan 2011

With Sleep Comes A Fusion Of Worlds: The Seven Sleepers Of Ephesus Through Formation And Transformation, Gwendolyn Collaco

Senior Capstone Projects

No abstract provided.


San Francesco D'Assisi E Santa Caterina Da Siena. La Loro Influenza Sulla Letteratura, La Cultura, La Religione E L'Arte Italiana Dei Primordi, Ann-Frances Hamill Dec 2006

San Francesco D'Assisi E Santa Caterina Da Siena. La Loro Influenza Sulla Letteratura, La Cultura, La Religione E L'Arte Italiana Dei Primordi, Ann-Frances Hamill

Master's Theses, Dissertations, Graduate Research and Major Papers Overview

Examines the works and thoughts of two Italian saints: Saint Francis of Assisi (1181-1226) and Saint Catherine of Siena (1347-1380). Explores the common ideological denominator in the works of these major figures and analyzes their impact on Italian society and culture.


Expanding Antiquity: Andrea Navagero And Villa Culture In The Cinquecento Veneto, Christopher James Pastore Jan 2003

Expanding Antiquity: Andrea Navagero And Villa Culture In The Cinquecento Veneto, Christopher James Pastore

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation examines a number of aspects of the history of the Venetian villa. In particular, it documents Andrea Navagero's influence on the nature of villeggiatura in the sixteenth-century Veneto. Although the initial impetus for this study was the evaluation of Navagero's descriptions of Islamic Spanish gardens and their influence on the Renaissance garden, aspects of his work, letters, and villas have forced a further reevaluation of Venetian villa life and its sources. Among the more significant results of my research on their impact are: a recasting of the early modern Venetian approach to the past, a recognition ...


The Renascence Of Classical Thought And Form In The Carolingian Period, Sara James Laster Jan 1983

The Renascence Of Classical Thought And Form In The Carolingian Period, Sara James Laster

Institute for the Humanities Theses

The political stability established under the rule of Charlemagne (768-814) was conducive to the flourishing of the simultaneous resurgence of art and learning. Inspired by the achievements of the Roman Empire, Charlemagne wished to give his subjects a feeling of spiritual unity, a sense of continuity with the past, and an enhanced intellectual life. The classical intellectual tradition is traced from ancient times to the Carolingian present to demonstrate that classicism was a continuum. The thesis examines the classical tradition in the intellectual life of the Carolingian period, its conscious rejuvenation in the figurative arts, and its manifestation in the ...