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Articles 1 - 30 of 105

Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Ritratto Di Un Uomo Con Simboli: Lorenzo Lotto On Vice And Virtue, Victor Hurtado Feb 2019

Ritratto Di Un Uomo Con Simboli: Lorenzo Lotto On Vice And Virtue, Victor Hurtado

Pathways: A Journal of Humanistic and Social Inquiry

The art of Lorenzo de Tomasso Lotto (1480-1557) has until recently gained critical attention. Lotto, born in Venice to Tomasso Lotto, lived and traveled throughout Italy. The Portrait of Man with Allegorical Symbols on display at the El Paso Museum of Art is one of Lotto’s most elusive paintings. A man of about thirty years of age is portrayed on a neutral background and divides a set of six allegorical symbols in axially. He gestures toward a set of three symbols hanging from a festoon of laurel leaves: an armillary sphere, intertwined palm branches, and a full-blown bladder. A ...


Music And The Act Of Song In Dante’S ‘Purgatorio’ And ‘Paradiso’, Kevin Brownlee Dec 2018

Music And The Act Of Song In Dante’S ‘Purgatorio’ And ‘Paradiso’, Kevin Brownlee

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

The present paper explores the relation between the vernacular words used to designate the Act of Song, and the inscribed texts of the Sung Music itself, by considering a set of key cases first in Purgatory and then in Paradise. It focuses on important moments of structural and literary transition, at the same time as showing how sung sacred texts relate to each other (and to other kinds of passages) in important functional ways. I examine how song works in five key moments of the protagonist’s journey: the exit from the final terrace of the Purgatorial mountain, and the ...


From Casella To Cacciaguida: A Musical Progression Toward Innocence, Thomas E. Peterson Dec 2018

From Casella To Cacciaguida: A Musical Progression Toward Innocence, Thomas E. Peterson

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

The essay draws an arc between the episodes of Casella and Cacciaguida under the sign of music. It explores the symmetry between the brief encounter with the minstrel who sings lines from Dante’s poetry, and the extended episode with Dante’s ancestor, who instructs him about his destiny. The symmetry is at once biographical, as the two scenes are among the most personal in the Commedia, theoretical, as they exemplify the relations between poetry and music expounded on in De vulgari eloquentia and Convivio, and theological, in a sense consistent with the writings of Augustine and Boethius. If Mars ...


Dante, Liszt, And The Alienated Agony Of Hell, Tekla Babyak Dec 2018

Dante, Liszt, And The Alienated Agony Of Hell, Tekla Babyak

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Dante Alighieri’s Inferno portrays Hell as an alienated realm in which the doomed spirits must spend eternity in isolation and regret. The Hungarian composer Franz Liszt (1811–1886) responded to this work with his Dante Symphony (1857) based on the Inferno and Purgatorio, in which he gave musical form to Dante’s textual expressions of agony. Throughout this two-movement work, Liszt offers a musical translation of the theological and emotional world portrayed in Dante’s Divina Commedia. This article examines Liszt’s evocations of silence, memory, regret, and redemption in the Dante Symphony. These evocations are enhanced by Liszt ...


Nineteenth- And Twentieth-Century Musical Adaptations Of Dante’S ‘Commedia’: ‘Dante’S Greatest Hits’, Maria Ann Roglieri Dec 2018

Nineteenth- And Twentieth-Century Musical Adaptations Of Dante’S ‘Commedia’: ‘Dante’S Greatest Hits’, Maria Ann Roglieri

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Composers through the centuries have tried to depict Dante’s Commedia in music, using Dante’s verses, characters, and design for Hell, Purgatory, and Heaven, and their compositions. This paper looks at some of the trends in musical adaptations of the Commedia and also some of the “greatest hits”—in the author’s opinion. Works by James Norton, Patric Standford, Jacob ter Veldhuis, David Denniston, Franz Liszt, Donald Martino, Tod Machover, Anita Saij, Allik and Mulder, and Theodore Wiprud are discussed.


“Dentro A La Danza De Le Quattro Belle” (Purg. 31.104): Dance In Dante’S ‘Commedia’, Madison U. Sowell Dec 2018

“Dentro A La Danza De Le Quattro Belle” (Purg. 31.104): Dance In Dante’S ‘Commedia’, Madison U. Sowell

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Missing from standard reference works on Dante’s Commedia are separate entries devoted exclusively to dance or dancing. Primary sources for the history of dance in the Italian Trecento derive from tablatures (musical notations), scattered iconographic images, and literary works, such as Boccaccio’s Decameron and Dante’s Commedia. Representations of dancing in these works invariably double as a symbolic language or meta-commentary on the surrounding narrative. The interpretation of dance’s role in late medieval art and literature depends not only on the context but also on the type of dance depicted. This article focuses on the allegorical roles ...


Conversations With Francesca: Tchaikovsky, Liszt, And Wagner (And Zandonai And Granados And Rachmaninov) Go To Hell, Jess Tyre Dec 2018

Conversations With Francesca: Tchaikovsky, Liszt, And Wagner (And Zandonai And Granados And Rachmaninov) Go To Hell, Jess Tyre

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

Tchaikovsky completed his tone poem Francesca da Rimini in 1876, during the period he was attending the premiere of Wagner’s Ring Cycle at Bayreuth. Critics of the work drew comparisons with the Tetralogy and faulted what seemed to be Tchaikovsky’s derivative inspiration. Indeed, the composer him-self acknowledged Wagner’s influence. In this paper, I set aside influence to consider intertextual dialogues between Tchaikovsky’s work and others by Liszt, Zandonai, Rachmaninov, and not Wagner’s Ring, but Tristan und Isolde. Drawing upon theories by Klein and Peirce, I examine parallelisms of topic, melodic contour, tonal motion, and timbral ...


Singing For Dante In ‘Purgatorio’ 30–31, Helena Phillips-Robins Dec 2018

Singing For Dante In ‘Purgatorio’ 30–31, Helena Phillips-Robins

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This essay investigates types of sociality enacted through song, as depicted in Dante’s Earthly Paradise. The first section of the essay argues that the singing of Psalm 30 (In te, Domine, speravi) in Purgatorio 30 is a way of enacting a particular mode of compassion. In the second section of the essay I argue that Dante’s depiction of Psalm 30—together with his depiction of the antiphon sung in Purgatorio 31, the Asperges me—invites a devotional response from the reader. The sociality of prayer can involve not only the characters, but also the readers of the Commedia ...


“Temprando Col Dolce L’Acerbo”: Instrumental And Vocal Polyphony In The ‘Commedia’, Francesco Ciabattoni Dec 2018

“Temprando Col Dolce L’Acerbo”: Instrumental And Vocal Polyphony In The ‘Commedia’, Francesco Ciabattoni

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This essay tracks the historical-musicological context of the lemma “organi” / “organo” as it appears in Purg. 9.144 and Par. 17.44. Drawing from medieval treatises and monks’ descriptions such as Raban Maur, Notkerus Balbulus, Baldric of Dol, Aelred of Rievaulx, and Wulstan, the author uses intertextual evidence to show that Purg. 9.144 (“quando a cantar con organi si stea”) evokes a great pipe organ as was found in some medieval churches. The essay also argues that Par. 17.43–44 (“come viene ad orecchia / dolce armonia da organo”) should be understood as a polyphonic organum that serves the ...


Stasis And Carnal Song: Dante’S Medusa And The Siren, Fiorentina Russo Dec 2018

Stasis And Carnal Song: Dante’S Medusa And The Siren, Fiorentina Russo

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

In his epic journey, Dante experiences entrapments, digressions, and ultimately new apertures, leading him forward on his journey to Paradise. The hag-siren of Purgatorio 19 is one of the primary figures, whose song sways the poet in a moment of reverie, embodying a de-mobilizing entrapment most unique and perilous within the poem. While the patristic and medieval traditions have traditionally portrayed the siren as a figure for the deleterious effects of music on the soul, Dante scholarship has glossed the dolce serena as a coordinate for the Medusa of Inferno 9. The siren's association with the Medusa implicitly harkens ...


Ironizing Ugolino, David Heinsen Dec 2018

Ironizing Ugolino, David Heinsen

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This article analyzes an adaptation of Canto 33 of the Inferno, a musical setting of Count Ugolino composed by Gaetano Donizetti (1828). The composition is first presented within the frame of its contemporaneous aesthetic, one that treats Ugolino as a pathos-inspired tale of human suffering. Donizetti’s composition, however, fails to align itself to this tragic reading due to structural contradictions that prevent the listener from sympathizing with the musical agent. To address this divergence, the article extends the most recent theories of musical narrative by Byron Almén and Michael Klein to propose an ironic reading of the work, essentially ...


Dante Decrypted: Musica Universalis In The Textual Architecture Of The ‘Commedia’, C.S. Adoyo Dec 2018

Dante Decrypted: Musica Universalis In The Textual Architecture Of The ‘Commedia’, C.S. Adoyo

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

For seven centuries scholars have speculated about the structural design of Dante’s Commedia but remain perplexed by the poem’s comprehensive ar-chitecture. This study undertakes a strictly empirical quantitative analysis of Dante’s magnum opus to address this lacuna. The outcome of this analysis enumerates the correspondence between the foundational rationale of the Commedia’s textual architecture and both physical and metaphysical concepts of Ptolemaic cosmology and Pythagorean principles of harmony and propor-tion as described by Boethius. The poem manifests a musically and mathemat-ically meticulous design conceptualized as musica universalis and expressed as musica instrumentalis that echoes Paschal and ...


“Scores For A Particular Chemical Orchestra”: The ‘Commedia’ And The Matter Of Sound In Osip Mandelstam’S ‘Conversation About Dante’, Andrea Gazzoni Dec 2018

“Scores For A Particular Chemical Orchestra”: The ‘Commedia’ And The Matter Of Sound In Osip Mandelstam’S ‘Conversation About Dante’, Andrea Gazzoni

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This paper discusses the implications of the wide-ranging use of sound in Osip Mandelstam’s 1933 essay “Conversation about Dante,” a landmark in the twentieth-century reception of Dante. With a special focus on the sound mo-tives incorporated in Mandelstam’s description of the Commedia, the Con-versation is analyzed as a study in the receptiveness of the reader, as it is acti-vated by the poetic speech of Dante in a call-and-response relation. At the same time, the paper explores issues of individuation, as reading through sound brings the reader back to his or her historicity and presentness, and of trans-formation, as ...


“Canzone... T’Ho Allevato Per Figliuola D’Amore”: Three Songs Of Love In Dante’S ‘Vita Nuova’, Alfred R. Crudale Dec 2018

“Canzone... T’Ho Allevato Per Figliuola D’Amore”: Three Songs Of Love In Dante’S ‘Vita Nuova’, Alfred R. Crudale

Bibliotheca Dantesca: Journal of Dante Studies

This paper examines the poetics and musicality of three canzoni of Dante’s Vita Nuova and explores how four fundamental musical elements produce specific meanings while evoking a desired emotion in the reader. “Donne ch’avete intelletto d’amore,” the first canzone of the Vita Nuova, initiates Dante’s poetry of praise as it contributes to the elation of the first third of the work. The two later canzoni, “Donna pietosa” and “Li occhi dolenti,” however, transition the Vita Nuova to a more somber and finally grief-stricken piece. Analysis of the musical elements of these three poems demonstrates how Dante ...


Building Heaven On Earth: Bishop Maurice And The Novam Fabricam Of Burgos Cathedral, Teresa Witcombe Nov 2017

Building Heaven On Earth: Bishop Maurice And The Novam Fabricam Of Burgos Cathedral, Teresa Witcombe

Bulletin for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies

The cathedral of Burgos, founded in 1221, was one of the first Gothic cathedrals to be constructed in the kingdom of Castile. Built by French masons and craftsmen, it stands as a monument to the introduction of the opus francigenum into Spain, and the convergence of French architectural models with Spanish ecclesiastical culture. As the thirteenth century progressed, this foreign style was adopted in a number of new cathedrals, including those of Toledo and León. Yet, although the architectural history of Burgos has been discussed in detail, far less is known about the cathedral’s founder and patron, Maurice, bishop ...


Discovering Jerusalem’S First Mosque On The Haram Al-Sharif And Capitalizing Jerusalem In The Seventh Century, Beatrice St. Laurent May 2017

Discovering Jerusalem’S First Mosque On The Haram Al-Sharif And Capitalizing Jerusalem In The Seventh Century, Beatrice St. Laurent

Bridgewater Review

No abstract provided.


Uncovering The Mystery Of Machu Picchu, Barbara Cardona Apr 2017

Uncovering The Mystery Of Machu Picchu, Barbara Cardona

Butler Journal of Undergraduate Research

If mysteries were ranked, Machu Picchu would be on the top of the list. This Incan site, destination for millions of tourists, archaeologists and researchers each year, is one of the biggest enigmas of Incan culture. Its mesmerizing view has prompted hundreds of unanswered questions about this civilization. Incan culture revolved around cities, built without reference to the world beyond. Although the Incas were incredible architects and inventors, they lack written records, shrouding their culture in mystery for many years. While research has illuminated some facets of Incan culture, a significant question still remains: what purpose did Machu Picchu play ...


Windows To The Divine: The Development Of Byzantine Art, Sam Klein Jan 2017

Windows To The Divine: The Development Of Byzantine Art, Sam Klein

Tenor of Our Times

Byzantine art took significant inspiration form its Greco-Roman heritage but then distinguished itself through a shift in focus away from Hellenic realism and towards formal abstractions of Christian motifs. These conventions developed alongside political and theological turbulence to eventually influence a vast area of Asia Minor and Eastern Europe.


The Lighthouse At Pharos - A Narrative, Curtis Baker Jan 2017

The Lighthouse At Pharos - A Narrative, Curtis Baker

Tenor of Our Times

This paper seeks to tell a story, a story of the colossal lighthouse of Pharos built outside a grand city as acknowledgement to and evidence of the prosperity and significance of Alexandria. Detailed accounts of the wealth and role of Alexandria, Ptolemy 1, Sostratus, and other contextual information is provided. Additionally, a synthesis of the various accounts regarding the dimensions and features of the lighthouse provides readers an view into the significance of one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.


Editor's Introduction To "Legal Worlds And Legal Encounters" -- Open Access, Elizabeth Lambourn Dec 2016

Editor's Introduction To "Legal Worlds And Legal Encounters" -- Open Access, Elizabeth Lambourn

The Medieval Globe

This introduction presents and draws together the articles and themes featured in this special issue of The Medieval Globe, “Legal Worlds and Legal Encounters.”


Mutilation And The Law In Early Medieval Europe And India: A Comparative Study -- Open Access, Patricia E. Skinner Dec 2016

Mutilation And The Law In Early Medieval Europe And India: A Comparative Study -- Open Access, Patricia E. Skinner

The Medieval Globe

This essay examines the similarities and differences between legal and other precepts outlining corporal punishment in ancient and medieval Indian and early medieval European laws. Responding to Susan Reynolds’s call for such comparisons, it begins by outlining the challenges in doing so. Primarily, the fragmented political landscape of both regions, where multiple rulers and spheres of authority existed side-by-side, make a direct comparison complex. Moreover, the time slippage between what scholarship understands to be the “early medieval” period in each region needs to be taken into account, particularly given the persistence of some provisions and the adapatation or abandonment ...


The Medieval Globe 2.2 (2016) Dec 2016

The Medieval Globe 2.2 (2016)

The Medieval Globe

No abstract provided.


The Future Of Aztec Law, Jerome A. Offner Dec 2016

The Future Of Aztec Law, Jerome A. Offner

The Medieval Globe

This article models a methodology for recovering the substance and nature of the Aztec legal tradition by interrogating reports of precontact indigenous behavior in the works of early colonial ethnographers, as well as in pictorial manuscripts and their accompanying oral performances. It calls for a new, richly recontextualized approach to the study of a medieval civilization whose sophisticated legal and jurisprudential practices have been fundamentally obscured by a long process of decontextualization and the anachronistic applications of modern Western paradigms.


Land And Tenure In Early Colonial Peru: Individualizing The Sapci, "That Which Is Common To All", Susan E. Ramirez Dec 2016

Land And Tenure In Early Colonial Peru: Individualizing The Sapci, "That Which Is Common To All", Susan E. Ramirez

The Medieval Globe

This article compares and contrasts pre-Columbian indigenous customary law regarding land possession and use with the legal norms and concepts gradually imposed and implemented by the Spanish colonial state in the Viceroyalty of Peru in the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. Natives accepted oral histories of possession going back as many as ten generations as proof of a claim to land. Indigenous custom also provided that a family could claim as much land as it could use for as long as it could use it: labor established rights of possession and use. The Spanish introduced the concept of private property ...


The Edict Of King Gälawdéwos Against The Illegal Slave Trade In Christians: Ethiopia, 1548 -- Featured Source, Habtamu M. Tegegne Dec 2016

The Edict Of King Gälawdéwos Against The Illegal Slave Trade In Christians: Ethiopia, 1548 -- Featured Source, Habtamu M. Tegegne

The Medieval Globe

This study explores the relationship between documentary-legal prescriptions of slavery and actual practice in late medieval Ethiopia. It does so in light of a newly discovered edict against the enslavement of freeborn Christians and the commercial sale of Christians to non-Christian owners, issued in 1548 by King Gälawdéwos. It demonstrates that this edict emerged from a dramatic and violent encounter between the neighboring Sultanate of Adal, which was supported by Muslim powers, and the Christian kingdom of Ethiopia, which had the support of expanding European powers in the region. The edict was therefore issued to reaffirm and clarify the principles ...


Common Threads: A Reappraisal Of Medieval European Sumptuary Law, Laurel Wilson Dec 2016

Common Threads: A Reappraisal Of Medieval European Sumptuary Law, Laurel Wilson

The Medieval Globe

Medieval sumptuary law has been receiving renewed scholarly attention in recent decades. But sumptuary laws, despite their ubiquity, have rarely been considered comprehensively and comparatively. This essay calls attention to this problem and suggests a number of topics for investigation, with specific reference to the first phase of European sumptuary legislation in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. It argues that comparative study demonstrates that this chronology closely parallels the development of the so-called “Western fashion system” and that the ubiquity of sketchy or nonexistent enforcement is evidence for the symbolic importance of sumptuary legislation, rather than its instrumentality. Comparison across ...


Toward A History Of Documents In Medieval India: The Encounter Of Scholasticism And Regional Law In The Smṛticandrikā, Donald R. Davis Jr. Dec 2016

Toward A History Of Documents In Medieval India: The Encounter Of Scholasticism And Regional Law In The Smṛticandrikā, Donald R. Davis Jr.

The Medieval Globe

In order to understand the legal use and significance of documents in medieval India, we need to start from the contemporaneous legal categories found in the Sanskrit scholastic corpus called dharmaśāstra. By comparing these categories with actual historical documents and inscriptions, we gain better insight into the encounter of pan-Indian legal discourse in Sanskrit and regional laws in vernacular languages. The points of congruence and transgression in this encounter will facilitate a nuanced history of documents and their use beyond unhelpfully broad categories of written and oral. A new translation of one major scholastic discussion of documents is presented as ...


Chinese Porcelain And The Material Taxonomies Of Medieval Rabbinic Law: Encounters With Disruptive Substances In Twelfth-Century Yemen, Elizabeth Lambourn, Phillip I. Ackerman-Lieberman Dec 2016

Chinese Porcelain And The Material Taxonomies Of Medieval Rabbinic Law: Encounters With Disruptive Substances In Twelfth-Century Yemen, Elizabeth Lambourn, Phillip I. Ackerman-Lieberman

The Medieval Globe

This article focuses on a set of legal questions about ṣīnī vessels (literally, “Chinese” vessels) sent from the Jewish community in Aden to Fustat (Old Cairo) in the mid-1130s CE and now preserved among the Cairo Geniza holdings in Cambridge University Library. This is the earliest dated and localized query about the status of ṣīnī vessels with respect to the Jewish law of vessels used for food consumption. Our analysis of these queries suggests that their phrasing and timing can be linked to the contemporaneous appearance in the Yemen of a new type of Chinese ceramic ware, qingbai, which confounded ...


Sophocles' Electra As Agent Of Metatheatricality Apr 2016

Sophocles' Electra As Agent Of Metatheatricality

Discentes

No abstract provided.


An Alliterative Translation Of The Odyssey Book A: Lines 1-10 Apr 2016

An Alliterative Translation Of The Odyssey Book A: Lines 1-10

Discentes

No abstract provided.