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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Vice & Virtue As Woman?: The Iconography Of Gender Identity In The Late Anglo-Saxon Psychomachia Illustrations, Stephenie Mcgucken Oct 2019

Vice & Virtue As Woman?: The Iconography Of Gender Identity In The Late Anglo-Saxon Psychomachia Illustrations, Stephenie Mcgucken

Medieval Feminist Forum: A Journal of Gender and Sexuality

In the Late Anglo-Saxon illustrated manuscripts of Prudentius's Psychomachia, vice and virtue are often shown ambiguously and the audience is encouraged to question what is male and what is female, and whether such categories are appropriate in understanding these illustrations. This paper utilises transgender theory to demonstrate how gender could be deployed in Late Anglo-Saxon manuscripts to question the roles of men and women with the ultimate aim of stressing the importance of righteous behaviours.


Representing Camp: Constructing Macaroni Masculinity In Eighteenth-Century Visual Satire, Freya Gowrley May 2019

Representing Camp: Constructing Macaroni Masculinity In Eighteenth-Century Visual Satire, Freya Gowrley

ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830

This article asks how ‘Camp,’ as defined in Sontag’s 1964 essay, ‘Notes on Camp,’ might provide a valuable framework for the analysis of late eighteenth-century satirical prints, specifically those featuring images of the so-called ‘macaroni.’ Discussing a number of satirical prints and contemporary writings on the macaroni, the article reads them against Sontag’s text in order to establish its utility as a critical framework for understanding the images’ complex relationship of content, form, and function.