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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Roman Archaism In Depictions Of Apollo In The Augustan Period, Alisha Sanders May 2016

Roman Archaism In Depictions Of Apollo In The Augustan Period, Alisha Sanders

Honors Projects

At the end of the first century BCE, in order to spread the values and concepts that he wanted to perpetuate in his new political order, Augustus Caesar revived an archaistic art style based on that of the archaic period of ancient Greece. It was in this time that the Roman Empire was being established, and Augustus was taking sole power of the Roman world. This study is focused on works that include depictions of Apollo because one of the first and most studied examples of Augustus’s use of Roman archaism was the decorative program of the Temple of ...


The House Of Augustus And The Villa Farnesina: The New Values Of The Imperial Decorative Program, Megan Michelle Farlow Jan 2016

The House Of Augustus And The Villa Farnesina: The New Values Of The Imperial Decorative Program, Megan Michelle Farlow

Honors Theses at the University of Iowa

In a society that lacked the post-industrial divisions of public and private, work and home, the house in Augustan Rome served as a locus of an individual’s social status and power, as well as the place in which he both displayed and exercised his dignitas (rank and public authority).An elite’s social identity was both reflected in and augmented by the amenities of his home, which the Roman architect Vitruvius tells us should include atria, tablina, and exedrae.The archaeological remains of houses at sites like Pompeii, Herculaneum, and Rome indicate that the architecture, furnishings and wall paintings ...


"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff Dec 2014

"Future City In The Heroic Past: Rome, Romans, And Roman Landscapes In Aeneid 6–8", Eric Kondratieff

History Faculty Publications

From the Intro: “Arms and the Man I sing…” So Vergil begins his epic tale of Aeneas, who overcomes tremendous obstacles to find and establish a new home for his wandering band of Trojan refugees. Were it metrically possible, Vergil could have begun with “Cities and the Man I sing,” for Aeneas’ quest for a new home involves encounters with cities of all types: ancient and new, great and small, real and unreal. These include Dido’s Carthaginian boomtown (1.419–494), Helenus’ humble neo-Troy (3.349–353) and Latinus’ lofty citadel (7.149–192). Of course, central to his ...