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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Archaeology And Conservation Of The Middle Phrygian Gate Complex At Gordion, Turkey, Semih Gönen, Richard F. Liebhart, Naomi F. Miller, Elspeth Dusinberre May 2018

Archaeology And Conservation Of The Middle Phrygian Gate Complex At Gordion, Turkey, Semih Gönen, Richard F. Liebhart, Naomi F. Miller, Elspeth Dusinberre

Classics Faculty Contributions

In 2016, a project was undertaken at Gordion, Turkey, to stabilize and conserve the remains of a rubble platform built early in the Middle Phrygian period (ca. 800–700 b.c.e.) under the vast Gate Complex leading to the megarons on the Citadel Mound. In the process, aspects of Middle Phrygian building strategies came to light that enhanced our understanding gained from the original excavation in the 1950s. This article outlines the archaeology of the Middle Phrygian Gate Complex and the sophisticated internal structures that lent stability to the rubble platform upon which it was built, and examines the ...


A Mediterranean Mosaic: The Archaeological Evidence For Ethnic Diversity At Pithekoussai, Rachel Dewan Oct 2014

A Mediterranean Mosaic: The Archaeological Evidence For Ethnic Diversity At Pithekoussai, Rachel Dewan

Laurier Undergraduate Journal of the Arts

No abstract provided.


Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio Jan 2014

Athenian Black Glass Pottery: A View From The West, Justin St. P. Walsh, Carla Antonaccio

Art Faculty Articles and Research

Excavation of archaic Morgantina (c.700–450 BC), Sicily, has brought to light a significant pattern in the distribution of imported Greek pottery. This pattern, which shows a preference for imports with features that referred to metal vessels, is echoed at sites around the western Mediterranean. We argue that the preference for certain types was communicated back to Greek producers, and that it also reflects the particular local interests of non-Greeks, who associated metallic features not only with wealth, but also with their own ancestral traditions.


The Sanctuary Of Apollo Hypoakraios And Imperial Athens, Peter Nulton Dec 2002

The Sanctuary Of Apollo Hypoakraios And Imperial Athens, Peter Nulton

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

The Cave Sanctuary of Apollo on the North Slope of the Acropolis at Athens was investigated in 1896-97 and produced a rich collection of inscriptions relating to the cult. These inscriptions are published in full for the first time in this work. The author discusses the history of the cult. Far from being of great antiquity as readers of Euripides' "Ion" have long assumed, the cult was instituted in the time of Augustus when "The Athenians thought it fitting that their archons swear an oath that upheld tradition in connection to Apollo Patroos, but simultaneously honored their 'new Apollo'", the ...


Apollo Hypoakraios Reconsidered, Peter Nulton Dec 1999

Apollo Hypoakraios Reconsidered, Peter Nulton

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

In 1897, the excavations of P. Kabbadias uncovered ten votive plaques in a cave on the northwest slope of the Athenian Acropolis, thereby fixing the location of the "sanctuary of Apollo in a cave" mentioned by Pausanias (I.28.4). The inscriptions indicated that they were meant as dedications to Apollo Hypoakraios or Hypo Makrais, and that the dedicants were invariably members of the college of archons. Although the corpus has increased steadily since then, the inscriptions have not been treated together since Kabbadias's original publication.

In this paper, I will offer some conclusions drawn from a thorough re-analysis ...