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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

The Rock-Cut Room On The Acropolis At Golemo Gradište, Konjuh: Date And Purpose, Carolyn S. Snively Jan 2014

The Rock-Cut Room On The Acropolis At Golemo Gradište, Konjuh: Date And Purpose, Carolyn S. Snively

Classics Faculty Publications

The anonymous city at the site of Golemo Gradište at the village of Konjuh, R. Macedonia, belongs to the period of Late Antiquity; the evidence indicates that it was founded in the 5th century. The lower town on the northern terrace was reconstructed, probably during the second quarter of the 6th century, but the inhabitants abandoned it, for the most part, later in that century and fled for refuge to the acropolis, where a settlement continued to exist into the early 7th century. Earlier material, beginning with the Late Neolithic and continuing sporadically through Bronze Age to Hellenistic, has been ...


The Sanctuary Of Apollo Hypoakraios And Imperial Athens, Peter Nulton Dec 2002

The Sanctuary Of Apollo Hypoakraios And Imperial Athens, Peter Nulton

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

The Cave Sanctuary of Apollo on the North Slope of the Acropolis at Athens was investigated in 1896-97 and produced a rich collection of inscriptions relating to the cult. These inscriptions are published in full for the first time in this work. The author discusses the history of the cult. Far from being of great antiquity as readers of Euripides' "Ion" have long assumed, the cult was instituted in the time of Augustus when "The Athenians thought it fitting that their archons swear an oath that upheld tradition in connection to Apollo Patroos, but simultaneously honored their 'new Apollo'", the ...


Apollo Hypoakraios Reconsidered, Peter Nulton Dec 1999

Apollo Hypoakraios Reconsidered, Peter Nulton

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

In 1897, the excavations of P. Kabbadias uncovered ten votive plaques in a cave on the northwest slope of the Athenian Acropolis, thereby fixing the location of the "sanctuary of Apollo in a cave" mentioned by Pausanias (I.28.4). The inscriptions indicated that they were meant as dedications to Apollo Hypoakraios or Hypo Makrais, and that the dedicants were invariably members of the college of archons. Although the corpus has increased steadily since then, the inscriptions have not been treated together since Kabbadias's original publication.

In this paper, I will offer some conclusions drawn from a thorough re-analysis ...