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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Greek Bronze: Holding A Mirror To Life, Expanded Reprint From The Irish Philosophical Yearbook 2006: In Memoriam John J. Cleary 1949-2009, Babette Babich Jun 2009

Greek Bronze: Holding A Mirror To Life, Expanded Reprint From The Irish Philosophical Yearbook 2006: In Memoriam John J. Cleary 1949-2009, Babette Babich

Articles and Chapters in Academic Book Collections

To explore the ethical and political role of life-sized bronzes in ancient Greece, as Pliny and others report between 3,000 and 73,000 such statues in a city like Rhodes, this article asks what these bronzes looked like. Using the resources of hermeneutic phenomenological reflection, as well as a review of the nature of bronze and casting techniques, it is argued that the ancient Greeks encountered such statues as images of themselves in agonistic tension in dynamic and political fashion. The Greek saw, and at the same time felt himself regarded by, the statue not as he believed the ...


A Depiction Of A Comic Mythological Burlesque?, Kenneth S. Rothwell Jr. Jan 2009

A Depiction Of A Comic Mythological Burlesque?, Kenneth S. Rothwell Jr.

Classics Faculty Publication Series

A late eighteenth-century engraving is the only surviving record of a vase painting that shows a very odd scene, possibly reflecting a fifth- or fourth-century B.C. comedy.


The Main Chapel Of The Durres Amphitheater: Decoration And Chronology, Kimberly Bowes, John Mitchell Jan 2009

The Main Chapel Of The Durres Amphitheater: Decoration And Chronology, Kimberly Bowes, John Mitchell

Departmental Papers (Classical Studies)

The amphitheater at Durres in central Albania is one of the larger and better preserved amphitheaters of the Roman world, as well as one of the eastern-most examples of the amphitheater form. Nonetheless, it is not for its Roman architecture that the building is best known, but its later Christian decoration, specifically, a series of mosaics which adorn the walls of a small chapel inserted into the amphitheater's Roman fabric. First published by Vangel Toçi in 1971, these mosaics were introduced to a wider scholarly audience through their inclusion in Robin Cormack's groundbreaking 1985 volume Writing in Gold ...


Representations Of The Antonine Empresses On The Nymphaeum In Olympia, Rachel Meyers Jan 2009

Representations Of The Antonine Empresses On The Nymphaeum In Olympia, Rachel Meyers

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Although sculpted portraits often receive more scholarly attention than the statue bodies they were set into, the different types of statue bodies can reveal more information about the portrait statue as a whole. This paper examines the Nymphaeum in Olympia, a monument which originally included an impressive array of statues of the imperial family as well as the family of its commissioner, Herodes Atticus. By analyzing the statue type of each individual represented, I show that, although the male members of the imperial family may be easily distinguished from those of Herodes’ family according to the type of clothing worn ...


Russian Icons And American Money, 1928-1938, Wendy Salmond Jan 2009

Russian Icons And American Money, 1928-1938, Wendy Salmond

Art Faculty Articles and Research

The article explores the marketing tactics and consumer expectations with regards to icons released in the street markets and provincial cities of Soviet Russia and acquired by American collectors from 1928-1938. These icons, including those from Byzantium in the tenth century, were seen as cultural commodities during the Russian revolution and the subsequent socialist construction. The Soviet apparatus Antikvariat was tasked with appraising the icon collections held by the Gosmuzeifond or the State Museum Reserve for exports.


A Depiction Of A Comic Mythological Burlesque?, Kenneth Rothwell Dec 2008

A Depiction Of A Comic Mythological Burlesque?, Kenneth Rothwell

Kenneth S Rothwell, Jr.

A late eighteenth-century engraving is the only surviving record of a vase painting that shows a very odd scene, possibly reflecting a fifth- or fourth-century B.C. comedy.


The Three-Figured Reliefs: Copies Or Neoattic Creations?, Peter E. Nulton Ph.D. Dec 2008

The Three-Figured Reliefs: Copies Or Neoattic Creations?, Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

The well-known group of four three-figured reliefs, existing in several copies and once assigned to the Altar of Pity in Athens, has always eluded interpretation as a coherent iconographical program. The four scenes depicted are Orpheus and Eurydice, Herakles in the garden of the Hesperides, Herakles with Perithoos and Theseus, and Medea with the Peliads. Though some have questioned the association of the reliefs with the Altar, the conventional dating has not been challenged, in spite of the growing recognition that some of the pieces (most notably the Orpheus relief) are largely unparalleled in the Classical Greek idiom. Careful reexamination ...


Atlantean Prose And The Search For Democracy, Nick J. Sciullo Dec 2008

Atlantean Prose And The Search For Democracy, Nick J. Sciullo

Nick J. Sciullo

Atlantis, the Lost City, has been a focal point of folklore, archeological inquiry, literary criticism, and mystic interpretation. It has boggled the brilliant, confused scientists, and sparked the interest of children. "Skeptics, archaeologists, geologists, and anthropologists may rant and rave, but the myth of Atlantis endures. In every generation, someone emerges to champion the cause and to embroider the story." But the significance of Atlantean prose as an avenue through which to best understand critical legal thought has not been explored in depth. To be sure, there have been numerous books, articles, and opinions analyzing Atlantis, but little attention has ...