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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

The Collapse Of Empire At Gordion In The Transition From The Achaemenid To The Hellenistic World, Elspeth R. M. Dusinberre Jun 2019

The Collapse Of Empire At Gordion In The Transition From The Achaemenid To The Hellenistic World, Elspeth R. M. Dusinberre

Classics Faculty Contributions

Gordion, ancient capital of Phrygia, was a large and thriving city of secondary importance during the period of the Achaemenid Persian Empire (ca 550–333 BC). Recent work makes possible a reconsideration of the site: evaluating its architecture, finds and use of landscape within and after the socio-economic and administrative context of the Achaemenid imperial system enables the following new overview. During the Achaemenid period, Gordion’s populace participated in the broad cultural exchanges enabled by the imperial system and may have emphasised animal husbandry. When Alexander’s conquest led to the collapse of the Achaemenid administrative infrastructure, the impact ...


Archaeology And Conservation Of The Middle Phrygian Gate Complex At Gordion, Turkey, Semih Gönen, Richard F. Liebhart, Naomi F. Miller, Elspeth Dusinberre May 2018

Archaeology And Conservation Of The Middle Phrygian Gate Complex At Gordion, Turkey, Semih Gönen, Richard F. Liebhart, Naomi F. Miller, Elspeth Dusinberre

Classics Faculty Contributions

In 2016, a project was undertaken at Gordion, Turkey, to stabilize and conserve the remains of a rubble platform built early in the Middle Phrygian period (ca. 800–700 b.c.e.) under the vast Gate Complex leading to the megarons on the Citadel Mound. In the process, aspects of Middle Phrygian building strategies came to light that enhanced our understanding gained from the original excavation in the 1950s. This article outlines the archaeology of the Middle Phrygian Gate Complex and the sophisticated internal structures that lent stability to the rubble platform upon which it was built, and examines the ...


Administration, Interaction, And Identity In Lydia Before The Persian Empire: A New Seal From Sardis, Elspeth Dusinberre Nov 2017

Administration, Interaction, And Identity In Lydia Before The Persian Empire: A New Seal From Sardis, Elspeth Dusinberre

Classics Faculty Contributions

A stamp seal excavated at Sardis in 2011 is a local product dating to the period of the Lydian Kingdom. It was found in a churned-up deposit along with artifacts dating before the mid-6th century BCE, including a large proportion of high-status items: the seal itself and an ivory furniture inlay showing a female figure holding a lion upside down, as well as fine pottery, bronze arrowheads, a few scattered human bones, and other items. The deposit seems to be destruction debris from the Persian sack of the city in ca. 550 b.c.e. The seal is unique and ...


Resistance, Revolt, And Revolution In Achaemenid Persia: Response, Elspeth Dusinberre Jan 2016

Resistance, Revolt, And Revolution In Achaemenid Persia: Response, Elspeth Dusinberre

Classics Faculty Contributions

How can archaeology help us see low-level local resistance to imperial domination, before it erupts into the kind of revolt or rebellion attested to in historical sources? The mortuary remains of Anatolia during the time of the Achaemenid Persian Empire provide a case study to examine this problem. They demonstrate two simultaneous directions of influence: participation by the elite in aspects of empire and imperial propagation, and local geographically-based resistance to imperial ideology and pressure.