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Full-Text Articles in Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque Art and Architecture

Architecture And Elite Identity In Late Antique Rome: Appropriating The Past At Sant'andrea Catabarbara, Gregor Kalas Dec 2012

Architecture And Elite Identity In Late Antique Rome: Appropriating The Past At Sant'andrea Catabarbara, Gregor Kalas

Gregor A. Kalas

The conversion of the fourth-century basilica of Junius Bassus, a secular structure on an aristocratic estate, into the church of Sant’Andrea Catabarbara in Rome during the 470s invites a discussion of how architectural adaptation contributed to the identity of its restorer, Valila.


Myth Materialized: Thirteenth Century Additions To The West Façade Of San Marco And Their Value In Venetian History Making, Michelle Reynolds Nov 2012

Myth Materialized: Thirteenth Century Additions To The West Façade Of San Marco And Their Value In Venetian History Making, Michelle Reynolds

Michelle Reynolds

The focus of this paper is on the basilica of San Marco in Venice and its relationship to the political and social culture in which it was erected. Looking directly at the set of four horses placed high above the five main entrances and the mosaics of the transfer of Saint Mark’s relics to Venice which originally decorated these portals in the thirteenth century, this paper looks to discover connections between these rather unique designs and stylistic choices and the unique sense of identity the Venetians had long perpetuated. The two different groups of works illuminate deliberate stylistic connections ...


Greek Bronze: Holding A Mirror To Life, Expanded Reprint From The Irish Philosophical Yearbook 2006: In Memoriam John J. Cleary 1949-2009, Babette Babich Nov 2012

Greek Bronze: Holding A Mirror To Life, Expanded Reprint From The Irish Philosophical Yearbook 2006: In Memoriam John J. Cleary 1949-2009, Babette Babich

Babette Babich

To explore the ethical and political role of life-sized bronzes in ancient Greece, as Pliny and others report between 3,000 and 73,000 such statues in a city like Rhodes, this article asks what these bronzes looked like. Using the resources of hermeneutic phenomenological reflection, as well as a review of the nature of bronze and casting techniques, it is argued that the ancient Greeks encountered such statues as images of themselves in agonistic tension in dynamic and political fashion. The Greek saw, and at the same time felt himself regarded by, the statue not as he believed the ...


Artículo Político Campaña Electoral 2011, Pablo Rosser Dec 2010

Artículo Político Campaña Electoral 2011, Pablo Rosser

pablo rosser

Artículo de opinión del autor, como miembro del PSOE en Alicante.


Federico Borromeo: Sacred Painting And Museum, Kenneth Rothwell, Pamela Jones Dec 2009

Federico Borromeo: Sacred Painting And Museum, Kenneth Rothwell, Pamela Jones

Kenneth S Rothwell, Jr.

In these two Latin treatises, published in 1624 and 1625, Borromeo laid out his views on religious art and described the collection he was amassing for the newly founded Ambrosiana. Here is the page at HUP: http://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?recid=29729


Revealing Iberian Woodcraft: Conserved Wooden Artefacts From South-East Spain, Pablo Rosser Dec 2009

Revealing Iberian Woodcraft: Conserved Wooden Artefacts From South-East Spain, Pablo Rosser

pablo rosser

Yolanda Carrion & Pablo Rosser Six wells at Tossal de les Basses in Spain captured a large assemblage of Iberian woodworking debris. The authors’ analysis distinguishes a wide variety of boxes, handles, staves, pegs and joinery made in different and appropriate types of wood, some – like cypress – imported from some distance away. We have here a glimpse of a sophisticated and little known industry of the fourth century BC.


A Depiction Of A Comic Mythological Burlesque?, Kenneth Rothwell Dec 2008

A Depiction Of A Comic Mythological Burlesque?, Kenneth Rothwell

Kenneth S Rothwell, Jr.

A late eighteenth-century engraving is the only surviving record of a vase painting that shows a very odd scene, possibly reflecting a fifth- or fourth-century B.C. comedy.


The Three-Figured Reliefs: Copies Or Neoattic Creations?, Peter E. Nulton Ph.D. Dec 2008

The Three-Figured Reliefs: Copies Or Neoattic Creations?, Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

The well-known group of four three-figured reliefs, existing in several copies and once assigned to the Altar of Pity in Athens, has always eluded interpretation as a coherent iconographical program. The four scenes depicted are Orpheus and Eurydice, Herakles in the garden of the Hesperides, Herakles with Perithoos and Theseus, and Medea with the Peliads. Though some have questioned the association of the reliefs with the Altar, the conventional dating has not been challenged, in spite of the growing recognition that some of the pieces (most notably the Orpheus relief) are largely unparalleled in the Classical Greek idiom. Careful reexamination ...


Atlantean Prose And The Search For Democracy, Nick J. Sciullo Dec 2008

Atlantean Prose And The Search For Democracy, Nick J. Sciullo

Nick J. Sciullo

Atlantis, the Lost City, has been a focal point of folklore, archeological inquiry, literary criticism, and mystic interpretation. It has boggled the brilliant, confused scientists, and sparked the interest of children. "Skeptics, archaeologists, geologists, and anthropologists may rant and rave, but the myth of Atlantis endures. In every generation, someone emerges to champion the cause and to embroider the story." But the significance of Atlantean prose as an avenue through which to best understand critical legal thought has not been explored in depth. To be sure, there have been numerous books, articles, and opinions analyzing Atlantis, but little attention has ...


Centum Homines: The Prototype Of The Alexander Mosaic And The Military Museum In The Hellenistic World, Peter Nulton Feb 2007

Centum Homines: The Prototype Of The Alexander Mosaic And The Military Museum In The Hellenistic World, Peter Nulton

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

Although it is generally accepted that the Alexander Mosaic copies a painting of the 4th Century BCE, the attribution of this prototype has never been settled. Numerous attempts have been made to associate it with painters recorded in Pliny's Natural History, notably Philoxenos of Eretria, and Alexander's court painter, Apelles.

If the painting were the work of any artist whose name survives, as strong a case can be made for Aristeides of Thebes as for Apelles or Philoxenos. Since Pliny's comment that Aristeides painted a battle against the Persians follows his treatment of the works of Apelles ...


Nature, Culture And The Origins Of Greek Comedy. A Study Of Animal Choruses, Kenneth Rothwell Dec 2006

Nature, Culture And The Origins Of Greek Comedy. A Study Of Animal Choruses, Kenneth Rothwell

Kenneth S Rothwell, Jr.

The animal choruses of Greek Old Comedy appeared on stage for a generation or two, mostly in the later fifth century B.C., and then disappeared. What factors intersected to bring them about? The book examines the evidence from vase-painting as well as ancient literary and philosophical traditions about animals and human culture.


The Sanctuary Of Apollo Hypoakraios And Imperial Athens, Peter Nulton Dec 2002

The Sanctuary Of Apollo Hypoakraios And Imperial Athens, Peter Nulton

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

The Cave Sanctuary of Apollo on the North Slope of the Acropolis at Athens was investigated in 1896-97 and produced a rich collection of inscriptions relating to the cult. These inscriptions are published in full for the first time in this work. The author discusses the history of the cult. Far from being of great antiquity as readers of Euripides' "Ion" have long assumed, the cult was instituted in the time of Augustus when "The Athenians thought it fitting that their archons swear an oath that upheld tradition in connection to Apollo Patroos, but simultaneously honored their 'new Apollo'", the ...


Apollo Hypoakraios Reconsidered, Peter Nulton Dec 1999

Apollo Hypoakraios Reconsidered, Peter Nulton

Peter E. Nulton Ph.D.

In 1897, the excavations of P. Kabbadias uncovered ten votive plaques in a cave on the northwest slope of the Athenian Acropolis, thereby fixing the location of the "sanctuary of Apollo in a cave" mentioned by Pausanias (I.28.4). The inscriptions indicated that they were meant as dedications to Apollo Hypoakraios or Hypo Makrais, and that the dedicants were invariably members of the college of archons. Although the corpus has increased steadily since then, the inscriptions have not been treated together since Kabbadias's original publication.

In this paper, I will offer some conclusions drawn from a thorough re-analysis ...