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Full-Text Articles in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

Botswana’S Public Health Crisis: The Hiv/Aids Epidemic
: A Case Study Of Botswana And Uganda, Gabrielle Onessimo Jan 2016

Botswana’S Public Health Crisis: The Hiv/Aids Epidemic
: A Case Study Of Botswana And Uganda, Gabrielle Onessimo

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this paper, I aim to answer the question: why are HIV rates in Botswana so high? The HIV epidemic in Botswana is a public health crisis that has dramatically affected the people of Botswana. Through comparative analysis with Uganda, a sub-Saharan African success story in terms of HIV, I argue that cultural and economic factors are responsible for high HIV rates in Botswana.

Cultural norms such as oppressive gender norms, a lack of knowledge surrounding the HIV virus, and a lack of sex education contribute to why Botswana has been unable to confront this serious epidemic. Uganda has been ...


The Clinical Spectrum Of Hiv Infections: Implications For Public Policy, Kenneth H. Mayer Jan 1988

The Clinical Spectrum Of Hiv Infections: Implications For Public Policy, Kenneth H. Mayer

New England Journal of Public Policy

The term acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a definition developed by the Centers for Disease Control to explain the epidemic of immunosuppression first seen in the United States among gay and bisexual men and intravenous drug users in the early 1980s. It is now known that the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the necessary agent for the compromise of the immune system which results in AIDS; however, there is a wide range of manifestations associated with HIV infection. Individuals with AIDS tend to have severe opportunistic infections or malignancies, and the vast majority ofindividuals die within two years after the ...


Editor's Note, Padraig O'Malley Jan 1988

Editor's Note, Padraig O'Malley

New England Journal of Public Policy

On occasion, the New England Journal of Public Policy will devote an entire issue to consideration of a public policy matter of major importance. The AIDS epidemic is such a matter, with a likely impact of overwhelming consequence well into the twenty-first century. The epidemic raises fundamental questions regarding the nature of individual freedom, our responsibilities to others, the always delicate balance between private rights and the public interest, and society's obligation to its "out" groups — whose members it has stigmatized, discriminated against, ridiculed, and treated as less than full and equal citizens. Indeed, it requires us to ask ...