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Full-Text Articles in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Studies

Harmony, Dissonance, Or Harm? The Psychological And Spiritual Promises And Perils Of Gay Christian Celibacy, Darren Jay Freeman-Coppadge Aug 2018

Harmony, Dissonance, Or Harm? The Psychological And Spiritual Promises And Perils Of Gay Christian Celibacy, Darren Jay Freeman-Coppadge

Graduate Doctoral Dissertations

Identity conflicts between sexuality and spirituality faced by religious lesbian and gay people have been described in literature, along with various methods to resolve such conflicts, including sexual orientation change efforts and identity integration. But a dearth of literature exists regarding celibacy as a means of resolving identity conflict. This study employed grounded theory to investigate the psychological and spiritual wellbeing of 12 current and former gay Christian celibates (GCCs). Results revealed how celibacy could harmonize sexuality and Christian spirituality, benefiting some celibates by providing them peace, satisfaction, and spiritual vibrancy. However, for many others, celibacy instigated dissonance between their ...


Whether Or Not 'It Gets Better'…Coping With Parental Heterosexist Rejection, Cara Herbitter Dec 2017

Whether Or Not 'It Gets Better'…Coping With Parental Heterosexist Rejection, Cara Herbitter

Graduate Masters Theses

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people face the burden of additional stressors as a result of their experiences of stigma and discrimination regarding their sexual minority status. Parental rejection of LGB people in the context of heterosexism serves as a powerful minority stressor associated with poorer mental health (e.g., Bouris et al., 2010; Ryan, Huebner, Diaz, & Sanchez, 2009). Few contemporary theories exist to describe the experience of parental rejection. In addition, the extant empirical research has focused primarily on youth experiences among White and urban LGB samples, signaling the need for research across the lifespan investigating more diverse samples. Moreover, prior published studies have not focused directly on how LGB people cope with parental rejection, but rather on the negative consequences associated with the rejection more generally. For the current study, I conducted semi-structured interviews with 15 LGB and queer (LGBQ) people about their experiences coping with parental rejection using retrospective recall questions. I sought to maximize diversity in the realms of experiences of parental rejection, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, gender, age, and U.S. regions. I analyzed the data using an adaptation of grounded theory methodology based upon the work of psychologist David Rennie (e.g., Rennie, Phillips, & Quartaro, 1988). The core category that emerged was: Parental rejection was experienced as harmfully corrective and then internalized; reframing the rejection as heterosexism mitigated internalized heterosexism and enabled adaptive acceptance strategies. The findings documented the common experiences shared by participants, which led to an original stage model of coping with heterosexism parental rejection, a central contribution of this study. In addition ...


Dying Metaphors And Deadly Fantasies: Freud, Baldwin And Race As Intimacy, Jean-Paul Rocchi Mar 2009

Dying Metaphors And Deadly Fantasies: Freud, Baldwin And Race As Intimacy, Jean-Paul Rocchi

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

This article has for foundation a textual dialogue between Baldwin and Freud. It argues that the imprint left by nineteenth and early twentieth-century racial metaphors on the Freudian construction of gender and sexuality has reproduced the logic of racial differentiation within psychoanalysis. This can be seen, for instance, in the mutual exclusion of identification and desire and the role played by unconscious fantasies. Baldwin's exploration of American white consciousness provides the lens for perceiving this racial undercurrent in Freud's texts, and more particularly in his 1915 sketch of the fantasy. In this text, Freud underlines the double nature ...


On Skin As Borderlands: Using Gloria Anzaldúa’S New Mestiza To Understand Self-Injury Among Latinas, Gabriela Sandoval Jun 2006

On Skin As Borderlands: Using Gloria Anzaldúa’S New Mestiza To Understand Self-Injury Among Latinas, Gabriela Sandoval

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

In this article, I develop a sociological perspective of self-injury. I use Gloria Anzaldúa's concepts of Coatlicue States and the New Mestiza Consciousness to expand our understanding of self-injury among Latina youth. I close with an acknowledgement that Gloria Anzaldúa believed in transformation, the transformation of cultures as well as of the self. I believe that by facilitating access to the new mestiza consciousness we can provide Latinas and Chicanas with alternative coping strategies. In this way helping them, as Anzaldúa said, "Transition from sacrificial goat to officiating priestess at the crossroads" (1999:102). The article advances initial thoughts ...


“Why Am I So Fat?” A Study Of The Interrelationship Between Poor Body Image And Social Anxiety, Jessica Haley Jan 2005

“Why Am I So Fat?” A Study Of The Interrelationship Between Poor Body Image And Social Anxiety, Jessica Haley

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

In this article I use various sociological theories to understand my experiences with poor body image and social anxiety. Although I do suffer from these, I learn that they are not completely my fault! Much of them have to do with many of the face-to-face interactions which I have been a part of throughout my life. I think that my parents and other family members have had a strong impact on the way that I view myself. Not only that, but society as a whole has affected me as well. If I did not live in such a materialistic, image-obsessed ...


Understanding The Psychological Impact Of Aids: The Other Epidemic, Marshall Forstein Jan 1988

Understanding The Psychological Impact Of Aids: The Other Epidemic, Marshall Forstein

New England Journal of Public Policy

HIV has created two epidemics, one of disease, the other the consequence of the psychological response to that disease. Thus far, behavioral change is the only effective means of interrupting the transmission of HIV. The underlying psychological dimensions of the societal and individual responses to AIDS are discussed, with suggestions for how both rational thinking and irrational fears and anxiety contribute to the development of public policy. Examples are given of how short-term solutions to reduce anxiety may actually create long-term problems, potentially increasing the risk of transmission of HIV. Specific psychological mechanisms that contribute to the epidemic of fear ...


Hiv Antibody Testing: Performance And Counseling Issues, Michael Gross Jan 1988

Hiv Antibody Testing: Performance And Counseling Issues, Michael Gross

New England Journal of Public Policy

This article assesses the performance of currently used tests for exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the infectious agent associated with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS); suggests, in view of that information, guidelines for counseling people seeking HIV antibody testing; and evaluates the claim that because antibody test results will effect behavior change in those who are infected, all members of high-risk groups should be tested.

HIV testing is likely to yield a high proportion of false-positive results in low-risk populations and infants born to infected mothers. A negative result may not establish freedom from infection in high-risk groups or the ...