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University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

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Articles 1 - 30 of 44

Full-Text Articles in English Language and Literature

Gender, Intertextuality & Market Demands: Publishing Children's Picture Books, Mackenzie Scott May 2020

Gender, Intertextuality & Market Demands: Publishing Children's Picture Books, Mackenzie Scott

Honors Theses

Children’s literature in the U.S. has long since reflected, and also influenced, the nation’s societal and cultural identity. The genre’s representation of gender has historically aligned with traditionally distinct and separate sex-typed roles of domestic or non-domestic behavior. Through textual analysis of 80 New York Times bestselling picture books between 2009 and 2019, this research seeks to determine if publishers and consumers are selecting titles that support or subvert stereotypical gender roles. Prior studies on gender representation in children’s literature have concluded that the prevalence of static, passive female characters and active male characters negatively ...


Creating Characterization Through The Use Of Setting And Counterpoint Characterization, Caroline Taylor Hood Dec 2019

Creating Characterization Through The Use Of Setting And Counterpoint Characterization, Caroline Taylor Hood

Honors Theses

The researcher looked at contemporary short story collections to analyze how the authors used setting and counterpoint characterization to develop fuller characters. The researcher then discussed how she would apply their methods to her work.


More Than Remembering: How Memoirists Recall And Write The Past, Faith Garner May 2019

More Than Remembering: How Memoirists Recall And Write The Past, Faith Garner

Honors Theses

Memory is integral to writing memoir, but sometimes, memory fails. How do successful memoirists mine their past for meaning, while staying true to their recollections? In my craft essay, I examine how writers harness the energy of their own explorations of the past. Then, I show how I have used these techniques in my own work. Six personal essays comprise the remainder of my thesis project.


Sickness And Contamination In The Yellow Wallpaper And Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets, Abigail Callahan Dec 2018

Sickness And Contamination In The Yellow Wallpaper And Maggie: A Girl Of The Streets, Abigail Callahan

Honors Theses

Sickness and Contamination in “The Yellow Wallpaper” and “Maggie: A Girl of the Streets” looks at feminism through the lens of nineteenth-century medical practices and how both Charlotte Perkins Gilman and Stephen Crane used them to argue against social standards for women. Most women during this time were seen as mentally ill or sick because they were in fact women. However, sexually active women were seen as even more sickly. Gilman in particular exposes sexism within the medical practice, and Crane builds on that by exposing sexism towards sexually active women through the idea of contamination. This paper refers to ...


The Grotesque Self: Finding Identity Through The Grotesque In The Works Of Carson Mccullers, Colton Greganti Dec 2018

The Grotesque Self: Finding Identity Through The Grotesque In The Works Of Carson Mccullers, Colton Greganti

Honors Theses

Historically speaking, the South has maintained rigid, male dominated constructions of gender, which have manifested themselves in almost every aspect of the southern individual’s actions, sense of self, and appearance. While much of southern culture has been centered on this rigid identity, the southern gothic literary tradition strays from this stark binary, especially in its depiction of female characters. Through the use of grotesque representations, these characters are able to form a unique identity and deviate from the phallocentric social norms, though it often comes at the cost of social alienation. However, even when tragedies strike these gothic heroines ...


Black Body, Black Mind, Japorsche Pettaway Aug 2018

Black Body, Black Mind, Japorsche Pettaway

Honors Theses

This project includes a collection of five essays focusing on my personal experiences, struggles, and triumphs as a young African American woman growing up in Chattanooga. These essays offer an incisive, candid look at race relations from the perspective of a maturing youth. The essays also examine life in the Housing Projects, the Affirmative Action myth, the struggles associated with being Black in a white space, and Black body objectification and mental illness. My essays also include an examination of the impact of the 2008 election on the underprivileged Black community I lived in. Some essays in my collection take ...


The Unexpected Alliance, Chase Clark, Roman Penney, Olivia Matlock, Jacob Davis, Carter Kilpatrick May 2018

The Unexpected Alliance, Chase Clark, Roman Penney, Olivia Matlock, Jacob Davis, Carter Kilpatrick

United States Race and Childhood Fiction

An Unexpected Alliance, which is set in the United States during WWII. The main character of our book is an adventurous seven-year-old girl named Betty whose father is fighting in the war. To help her father win the war, Betty sets off one day to go ‘scrapping’ for metal. Along the way, she meets an African American boy named Stanley who is also out ‘scrapping’ to help his brother who is away at war. Despite their societal differences, the unlikely duo combines their resources to not only find scrap metal to help their loved ones, they also develop a friendship ...


Sky's Limit, Cheyenne Pearson, Caleb Dockery, Kristen Elliot, Lucas Gallon, Houston Nichols May 2018

Sky's Limit, Cheyenne Pearson, Caleb Dockery, Kristen Elliot, Lucas Gallon, Houston Nichols

United States Race and Childhood Fiction

Sky’s Limit is about a 5-year-old biracial girl named Sky, growing up during the Civil Rights period. As she reaches the age of understanding, Sky begins to wonder why her mom cannot join her and her dad on their adventures. One day, her dad takes her to the ice cream shop and Sky realizes that no one else looks like her, nor do the other moms look like her mom. She eventually questions her dad about why her mom can never get ice cream with them. Her dad then reaches for her hand and begins to describe the racial ...


This Is What America Looks Like, Hannah Ragan, Mae Stuart, Lauren Croteau, Tyler Clemons May 2018

This Is What America Looks Like, Hannah Ragan, Mae Stuart, Lauren Croteau, Tyler Clemons

United States Race and Childhood Fiction

This is What America Looks Like. The name, inspired by the protest chant currently used to support to reinstatement of DACA, is intended to signify an embrace of the diversity of modern day America. After Nicholas makes a snide remark telling Eleanor, a Guatemalan immigrant , to go back to her own country, Mrs. Baker 's 3rd grade class is tasked with exploring their families' immigration history and journey to America. The story centers around a group of four students: Nicholas, a descendant of Eastern European immigrants who arrived at Ellis Island over a century ago; Grace, who came from Chinese ...


What Are Slaves?, Sarah Yarbrough, Sami Solberg May 2018

What Are Slaves?, Sarah Yarbrough, Sami Solberg

United States Race and Childhood Fiction

What Are Slaves? is about an eight-year-old, biracial boy named Danny who visits a historical antebellum era plantation with his mother. While observing the now present day museum, a picture of slave children working in a field catches Danny’s eye. Curious and having never learned about slaves, Danny inquires to his mother about what the children his age are doing. Danny’s mother gives him an explanation of what slaves are and how they ended up in their situation. Going from one photo exhibit to another, Danny asks his mother for reasons regarding the slaves’ appearance, workload, and education ...


Mrs. Venus's Class Exploring Jim Crow, Kiana Reece, Sara Leach, Emily Duggan, Zoe Boals, Tucker Mcclendon May 2018

Mrs. Venus's Class Exploring Jim Crow, Kiana Reece, Sara Leach, Emily Duggan, Zoe Boals, Tucker Mcclendon

United States Race and Childhood Fiction

Mrs. Venus’s Class Exploring Jim Crow. This story revolves around a classroom on a different planet full of alien children who are learning about American history, specifically the Jim Crow era. The teacher and the students discuss the injustices and oppression experienced by African Americans and other non-white citizens. The next day, American student Jimmy Turner joins them, and he is faced with animosity by some of the alien children in the class. The alien teacher points to the similarities in the children’s prejudice against the human and the prejudice that was prominent during the Jim Crow era.


The Bard And The Word: The Influence Of The Bible On The Writings Of William Shakespeare, Emily Gray May 2018

The Bard And The Word: The Influence Of The Bible On The Writings Of William Shakespeare, Emily Gray

Honors Theses

Widely hailed as the single greatest writer and poet of the English language, William Shakespeare is not only revered for the sheer quantity and wide-ranging genres of his writing, but also the exceptional written quality, well-executed thematic diversity, and ability to explore the timelessness of the human experience. With the 400th anniversary of the publication of the King James Bible occurring in 2011 and the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death following in 2016, scholarship on Shakespeare’s use of biblical material underwent a significant resurgence. The focus of much of this scholarship has been on simply identifying the numerous ...


Madness As "The Divided Self" In The Works Of American Female Authors, Katherine Sweat May 2018

Madness As "The Divided Self" In The Works Of American Female Authors, Katherine Sweat

Honors Theses

When R.D. Laing wrote The Divided Self in 1960, his goal was “to make madness, and the process of going mad, comprehensible.” Laing argued that psychosis was, at its core, an existential problem, driven by a sense of disconnection from the world and in turn, a fragmentation of the self. This thesis uses Laing’s theory of “the divided self” as a framework for examining how madness is constructed in Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s The Yellow Wallpaper (1890), Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar (1963), and Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle (1962). Each of ...


“I Must Turn Idolator”: Religious Inversion And The Quest For Genuine Faith In Moby-Dick, Will Marler Dragoo May 2017

“I Must Turn Idolator”: Religious Inversion And The Quest For Genuine Faith In Moby-Dick, Will Marler Dragoo

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This thesis explores the major religious themes of repentance, redemption, and expiation in Moby-Dick. While critics have examined some of these themes in isolation, my thesis will demonstrate how Melville takes these Christian doctrines and inverts them in order to display a shift from traditional religious practice to a genuine faith for those outside of God's covenant people. Using Father Mapple's sermon on Jonah as a paradigm through which to see the other religious inversions, I will explore how Ishmael repents of a false view of immorality, finds redemption through an immoral union, and follows a wicked captain ...


Gender, Consent, And Hermaphroditic Legibility In James Joyce's Ulysses And Finnegans Wake, Carter R. Elsea May 2017

Gender, Consent, And Hermaphroditic Legibility In James Joyce's Ulysses And Finnegans Wake, Carter R. Elsea

Honors Theses

It is difficult to imagine a more elusive, polemical author than James Joyce. He is often spoken of as both a cosmopolitan and a nationalist, syphilitic madman and genius, and misogynist and writer of écriture feminine. This final paradoxical view of Joyce is one that I find most compelling. However, this is not a project in feminist historiography attempting to reclaim Joyce for feminism, but rather a demonstration of the pulsing bodies that already exist between the texts. When exploring this idea of écriture feminine in Joyce’s Ulysses, one might be surprised that Hélène Cixous refers to Joyce’s ...


Silence For The One About To Sing: Selected Short Lyrics From Two Collections, Chasidi Rodgers May 2016

Silence For The One About To Sing: Selected Short Lyrics From Two Collections, Chasidi Rodgers

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

Silence for the One about to Sing contains a chapbook of 30 poems (selected from two collections) and a prologue. In the prologue, I discuss my influences and inspirations, and explain the creative and critical devices I use throughout my art. Inspired by the Portuguese music genre of fado and its latest iteration, the novo fado, selections in each collection feature code-switching, recurring motifs (birds, oil, and water), and sensory language. A variety of speakers and travelogues is also used to explore themes of agency, identity, loss, and restoration. These devices coalesce to produce a progressive framework for the classic ...


Underworld Journeys In The Faerie Queene And The Lord Of The Rings: Exploring The “Belly Of The Whale” Of Joseph Campbell’S Monomyth And The Effect On The Hero’S Return From Adventure, Kayla M. Kirkendall May 2015

Underworld Journeys In The Faerie Queene And The Lord Of The Rings: Exploring The “Belly Of The Whale” Of Joseph Campbell’S Monomyth And The Effect On The Hero’S Return From Adventure, Kayla M. Kirkendall

Honors Theses

This paper examines Joseph Campbell’s theory of the monomyth—the idea that great myths (heroes’ journeys) throughout history adhere to a single, basic structure. The most important step of this structure is arguably the Belly of the Whale/Descent into the Underworld, as can be seen in the Redcrosse Knight of Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene (Book One) and Gandalf, Frodo, and Aragorn of J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. These individual heroes reveal that the way in which they overcome (or fail to overcome) their underworlds determines the success or failure of the ...


Privately Deviant, Publicly Disciplined: The Violent Seizure Of Female Narratives In The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall, The Woman In White, And Lady Audley’S Secret, Amanda K. Hand May 2015

Privately Deviant, Publicly Disciplined: The Violent Seizure Of Female Narratives In The Tenant Of Wildfell Hall, The Woman In White, And Lady Audley’S Secret, Amanda K. Hand

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

In Victorian England, women were subjects within their patriarchal society. What Anne Brontë, Wilkie Collins, Mary Elizabeth Braddon emphasize and “sensationalize” is the subjugated marriage relationship, violently portraying men forcing their wives into submission. Brontë’s Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Collin’s The Woman in White, and Braddon’s Lady Audley’s Secret provide examples of men attempting to control the women in their lives. These novels deploy moments of violent seizure to dramatize and critique the inequalities inherent in the strict Victorian marriage laws. However, despite this usurpation of the female narrative, the insurgent testimony of the female voice ...


Minding The Gap: Connecting The Mirror Cities Of London In The Novels Of Neil Gaiman And China Miéville, Miranda Hill May 2015

Minding The Gap: Connecting The Mirror Cities Of London In The Novels Of Neil Gaiman And China Miéville, Miranda Hill

Honors Theses

Cities in reality that are transformed into cities in literature create the opportunity for two thematic elements: firstly, the Gothic feeling of the uncanny is created because the two cities are similar and yet dissimilar to one another. Secondly, satirical elements are introduced when the author uses the city within literature to expound upon issues within the city in reality. Neil Gaiman and China Miéville employ different perspectives to recreate the historical city of London within their novels, but their results are the same, and both the uncanny and satire are achieved. In Gaiman’s Neverwhere (1996), and Miéville’s ...


America's Closet Door: An Investigation Of Television And Its Effects On Perceptions Of Homosexuality, Sara Moroni Dec 2014

America's Closet Door: An Investigation Of Television And Its Effects On Perceptions Of Homosexuality, Sara Moroni

Honors Theses

This study investigates the relationship between television and social perceptions. It uses the television shows Will&Grace, The L Word, Queer as Folk, and Modern Family for rhetorical analysis. Then, it uses the information gained from the analysis to hypothesize how and why these television shows both reflect and affect social perceptions of homosexuality.


From Pretending To Supposing: Redeeming The Madwoman In Frances Hodgson Burnett's A Little Princess, Alexie Mcpherson Aug 2014

From Pretending To Supposing: Redeeming The Madwoman In Frances Hodgson Burnett's A Little Princess, Alexie Mcpherson

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This thesis demonstrates how the emergent genre of girls’ literature in the Victorian period served to destabilize and challenge contemporary restrictive depictions of women. It revises the theory of Gilbert and Gubar in The Madwoman in the Attic, which posits that in nineteenth-century literature, women could only function as diseased, insane prisoners or else as angelic rulers of the domestic sphere; this thesis employs examples from Frances Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess to prove that even during the height of Victorian literature, books written for and about young girls were already troubling the dichotomy set up by the literature ...


Fake News, Real Hip: Rhetorical Dimensions Of Ironic Communication In Mass Media, Paige L. Broussard Dec 2013

Fake News, Real Hip: Rhetorical Dimensions Of Ironic Communication In Mass Media, Paige L. Broussard

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This paper explores the growing genre of fake news, a blend of information, entertainment, and satire, in main stream mass media, specifically examining the work of Stephen Colbert. First, this work examines classic definitions of satire and contemporary definitions and usages of irony in an effort to understand how they function in the fake news genre. Using a theory of postmodern knowledge, this work aims to illustrate how satiric news functions epistemologically using both logical and narrative paradigms. Specific artifacts are examined from Colbert’s speech in an effort to understand how rhetorical strategies function during his performances.


Walt Whitman's Changing Perceptions Of The Effects Of The American Civil War And Its Impact On His Poetry, Andrew Pearcy Aug 2013

Walt Whitman's Changing Perceptions Of The Effects Of The American Civil War And Its Impact On His Poetry, Andrew Pearcy

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This paper seeks to examine the way that Walt Whitman’s perceptions about the American Civil War changed in Drum-Taps, his book of poems written about the war. The book attempts to capture the emotions of the Northern public throughout the war, without discussing any easily recognizable event of the war, thus creating an emotional record of it. The opening poems are jingoistic, declaring the justness of the war and the hope that it will be over soon with minimal casualties, but about midway through the tone of his poetry shifts into one of cautious optimism. After the shift Whitman ...


Sapphic Reflections Of Feminine Creative Power And Male Interruption In The Works Of Virginia Woolf, Mollee Kaitlyn Shannon May 2013

Sapphic Reflections Of Feminine Creative Power And Male Interruption In The Works Of Virginia Woolf, Mollee Kaitlyn Shannon

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

With queer theory and gender studies, the knowledge that Virginia Woolf was probably bisexual has come to the forefront of scholarship concerning the writer and her works. With queer theory has come an interest in Sapphism, a term evoking Sappho, the only female lyric poet for whom any poetry remains. Sappho’s poetry reveals her to be a “lesbian”: a woman expressing homoerotic feelings for other women. The word Sapphist has become interchangeable with the word lesbian, and Virginia Woolf has been proven to be a Sapphist in that sense; however, Sapphism as a literary philosophy has remained untouched by ...


New Directions In The Rhizome Of Children's Literature And Children's Culture: A Case Study In Transmedia Storytelling, Katosha O'Daniel May 2013

New Directions In The Rhizome Of Children's Literature And Children's Culture: A Case Study In Transmedia Storytelling, Katosha O'Daniel

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This thesis examines the changing idea of what constitutes a “text” in twenty-first century children’s literature and children’s culture. Beginning with John Newbery’s A Little Pretty Pocket-Book (1744), through the Golden Age of Children’s Literature—that of the 1860s to 1900—and as a result of the shift to a children’s culture in the 1950s onward, my project interrogates the historical rhizome of children’s literature and children’s culture. The historical rhizome, which serves as the framework for this thesis, indicates the emergence of a fourth branch in the rhizome in our current epistemic ...


Speed And Stasis: Femininity And Symbolism In John Dos Passos's 1919, Natalie Tara Cope May 2013

Speed And Stasis: Femininity And Symbolism In John Dos Passos's 1919, Natalie Tara Cope

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

My thesis connects the ideas of speed, movement, symbolism and feminism in Dos Passos’s work 1919, the second book of the U.S.A. trilogy. For the women in the novel―Janey Williams, Eveline Hutchins, Eleanor Stoddard, and Daughter― there is an ever-present tension in their existence as they struggle between the static roles available for women as symbolic figures outside of time and the personal mobility that allows them to participate in history. By using speed as a measure of extreme behavior, I examine the degrees to which women could move outside of their domestic sphere of inequality ...


The Path Of Lucius Park And Other Stories Of John Valley, Elijah David Carnley May 2013

The Path Of Lucius Park And Other Stories Of John Valley, Elijah David Carnley

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This thesis comprises a writer’s craft introduction and nine short stories which form a short story cycle. The introduction addresses the issue of perspective in realist and magical realist fiction, with special emphasis on magical realism and belief. The stories are a mix of realism and magical realism, and are unified by characters and the fictional setting of John Valley, FL.


From Future Homemaker Of America To The Lesbian Continuum: The Queering Of Mary Ann Singletone In Armistead Maupin's Tales, Sara Katherine White Dec 2012

From Future Homemaker Of America To The Lesbian Continuum: The Queering Of Mary Ann Singletone In Armistead Maupin's Tales, Sara Katherine White

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City is a turning point in homosexual literature in twentieth century America. This paper mainly examines the character of Mary Ann Singleton and the "queering" of her character. The writings of Michael Foucault, Judith Butlter, Adrienne Rich, Eve K. Sedgewich, and Simone de Beauvoir are vital in understanding how a straight woman journeys onto the lesbian continuum as a revolt against gender roles (defined by Butler and Beauvoir) and as a result of her friendship with Michael Tolliver. Michael's character provides a discourse (as defined by Foucault) on homosexuality and through this discourse ...


"Reader" In Jane Eyre, Siruo Li May 2012

"Reader" In Jane Eyre, Siruo Li

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This thesis is designed to show the development of feminist power of Jane Eyre, the heroine of Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre, by examining how her reader is addressed in the totality of this novel. The main body of this thesis will follow the four parts of Jane Eyre’s different period of her life: in childhood, in Thornfield, in Moor House and in Ferndean Manor. The rhetorical instrument of addressing her reader is influenced by her speech and silence, and appears in a gradually increasing frequency in the four parts. In this sense, Jane Eyre’s female voice ...


Heathens And How They're Made, Garret Crowe May 2012

Heathens And How They're Made, Garret Crowe

Masters Theses and Doctoral Dissertations

This thesis contains 23 poems with an introduction in which I explain how I craft my poetry. In the introduction, I use examples from both critical and creative sources to identify tools I utilize during the craft process of a poem. The subject matter of the poems within this thesis ranges from speakers pondering childhood moments to mature voices examining domestic relationships. Some of the poems may be considered confessional poetry as the works are immensely personal and the speaker is I, the writer. Other poems apply literary styles that are commonly associated with Dirty Realism and Southern Gothic.