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Articles 211 - 227 of 227

Full-Text Articles in English Language and Literature

You've Gotta Read This: Summer Reading At Musselman Library (2003), Musselman Library Apr 2003

You've Gotta Read This: Summer Reading At Musselman Library (2003), Musselman Library

You’ve Gotta Read This: Summer Reading at Musselman Library

Each year Musselman Library asks Gettysburg College faculty, staff, and administrators to help create a suggested summer reading list to inspire students and the rest of our campus community to take time in the summer to sit back, relax, and read. These summer reading picks are guaranteed to offer much adventure, drama, and fun!

This first issue of You’ve Gotta Read This was published in May 2003 and featured fabulous clip-art for the cover and recommendations from 37 faculty members. The most popular title for this year? The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver.


We Are Not Friends, Fred G. Leebron Jan 2001

We Are Not Friends, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

There is something about the way the phone rings that lets you know it's Them - a kind of glitter in the chime, a certain je ne sais quoi to the cadence, which seems to skip a beat as if it can't believe that They are calling. You pick up, heart throbbing, getting ready to move your mouth, a sly frisson of sweat striking your palms.

"They asked me to call," Their assistant says. "They want you at the house next Thursday. And then you'll all go somewhere. A plane will be involved. You'll want to bring ...


Jefferson In Central Pennsylvania, Fred G. Leebron Jul 2000

Jefferson In Central Pennsylvania, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Ms-001: Wilton C. Dinges Collection (H. L. Mencken Collection), Christine M. Ameduri May 2000

Ms-001: Wilton C. Dinges Collection (H. L. Mencken Collection), Christine M. Ameduri

All Finding Aids

The Wilton C. Dinges Collection is arranged into five Series. I. Biographical Information, II. Antoinette Feleky, III. Correspondence, IV. Manuscripts & Published Material and V. Miscellaneous.

The bulk of the collection is correspondence between Mencken and Antoinette Feleky, wife of Charles Feleky, a close friend of Mencken's. Other items include several typed manuscripts, bibliographic information compiled from newspaper and magazine articles about Mencken, family and friends and other miscellaneous.

The library also holds more than 150 volumes of Menckeniana in addition to two scrapbooks (indexed) of photostatic copies of editorials and articles by Mencken that appeared in the Baltimore Evening ...


Ms-006: Papers Of The Philomathaean And Phrenakosmian Societies, Melodie A. Foster, Christine M. Ameduri Mar 2000

Ms-006: Papers Of The Philomathaean And Phrenakosmian Societies, Melodie A. Foster, Christine M. Ameduri

All Finding Aids

The bulk of the collection consists of the official record books of the two societies and their libraries. Constitutions, minute books, account books and library circulation records cover the period 1831-1924 (with gaps). There are several library catalogues, arranged both alphabetically and numerically. Also included are correspondence spanning the societies’ years of existence in the form of letters received and copies of letters sent, and evidence of society activities including event programs, debating topics, and copies of essays, poems and addresses delivered before the societies.

Special Collections and College Archives Finding Aids are discovery tools used to describe and provide ...


My Psychologist, My Psychiatrist, Fred G. Leebron Aug 1997

My Psychologist, My Psychiatrist, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

I could not distinguish between them except by what we did. I was ten, then eleven. I would not ride the school bus. I always slunk home saying I missed it. I made my mother come to school with me every day, and sit in the lobby so I could wave to her during recess and class changes. In the evenings my father would come home from work, hear my mother's report, and storm upstairs, his weight pounding on the hardwood steps. I would be out of breath with crying, my head in the pillow, waiting to feel what ...


'Judith' And The Rhetoric Of Heroism In Anglo‐Saxon England, Christopher R. Fee Jan 1997

'Judith' And The Rhetoric Of Heroism In Anglo‐Saxon England, Christopher R. Fee

English Faculty Publications

The Old English Judith differs from the Liber Judith of the Vulgate at several crucial points, and in one particularly important way. In the Vulgate version of the story, Judith is a heroine in every sense of the word: she is a tropological symbol of Chastity at battle with Licentiousness, an allegorical symbol of the Church in its constant and eventually triumphant battle with Satan, and an inspirational figure who infuses her warriors with much needed courage and confidence; but the Vulgate Judith is also, in a very real sense, the agent by which God's will is executed and ...


Hotel Room With My Brother, Fred G. Leebron Oct 1994

Hotel Room With My Brother, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Productive Destruction: Torture, Text, And The Body In The Old English 'Andreas', Christopher R. Fee Jan 1994

Productive Destruction: Torture, Text, And The Body In The Old English 'Andreas', Christopher R. Fee

English Faculty Publications

Writing in the Old English Andreas is at once both a productive and a destructive activity. We first become aware of the dangerous power of the written word quite early in the poem, when we learn that the Mermedonians have subverted the normally productive activity of writing into a tool for calculating the execution dates of their prisoners (134-37). Later, the words uttered by the devil to incite the Mermedonians against Andreas illuminate the lexical relationship between the destructive nature of writing and the productive nature of torture in the semiotic context of the poem. Finally, in a sort of ...


Lovelock, Fred G. Leebron Oct 1993

Lovelock, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

Presents a short story about Benjamin Scott, an ex-convict whose life turned a different course after a one-night stand with a retarded woman in Lovelock, Nevada. Promise of a job in San Francisco; Memories of traveling from state to state to get to his destination; Meeting Ana and her sister Lisa; Feelings of guilt for sleeping with Ana; Apologizing to the sisters; Decision to follow Ana to San Diego.


Résumé, Fred G. Leebron Oct 1993

Résumé, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

I sat at the back of a pale classroom and watched my father teach. "Creative Inspiration," my father lectured, "is what you have as soon as you are born and the doctor slaps you on your bottom. That first cry, because you're hungry or tired or just glad to be breathing, is your first creative inspiration." I leaned back in my chair to ease the heat rising in my face. "Incidentally," my father said, grinning at the under graduates, "I've read the Sexual Harassment pamphlet, and I want you all to know I don't slap bottoms." [excerpt]


On Arrival, Fred G. Leebron Jan 1993

On Arrival, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


In Another Country, Fred G. Leebron Sep 1990

In Another Country, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

That summer we lived in an icebox of a house, where nothing worked. The gas stove was stuck in a chimney that had no fireplace, plaid linoleum covered the chipped and rotting floor, a cold wet wind blew through the cracks in the doors and windows, the light bulbs hummed and fluttered, the clock struck at odd and unwarranted times, and we weren't allowed to drink the water from the sink because it came from an impure place. [excerpt]


New Life, Fred G. Leebron Oct 1986

New Life, Fred G. Leebron

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


1. Introduction, Robert L. Bloom, Basil L. Crapster, Harold A. Dunkelberger, Charles H. Glatfelter, Richard T. Mara, Norman E. Richardson, W. Richard Schubart Jan 1958

1. Introduction, Robert L. Bloom, Basil L. Crapster, Harold A. Dunkelberger, Charles H. Glatfelter, Richard T. Mara, Norman E. Richardson, W. Richard Schubart

Section XII: The Post-Enlightenment Period

Criticism of the methods and conclusions of the Enlightenment was initiated almost as soon as the movement itself had begun. It is for this reason that this chapter follows immediately after the one on the Enlightenment, rather than after the later chapters on nationalism, liberalism, industrialism, evolutionary biology, and the social sciences. These movements made their appearance during the latter part of the eighteenth century, but often served only to broaden and strengthen the earlier criticisms of the Enlightenment and the demands for a more adequate way of thinking than it offered. The movements of thought with which we are ...


3. Edmund Burke And Conservatism, Robert L. Bloom, Basil L. Crapster, Harold A. Dunkelberger, Charles H. Glatfelter, Richard T. Mara, Norman E. Richardson, W. Richard Schubart Jan 1958

3. Edmund Burke And Conservatism, Robert L. Bloom, Basil L. Crapster, Harold A. Dunkelberger, Charles H. Glatfelter, Richard T. Mara, Norman E. Richardson, W. Richard Schubart

Section XII: The Post-Enlightenment Period

Edmund Buxke (1729-1797) has often been compared to John Wesley, and there are several bases for such a comparison. Both infused a new life and meaning into the coin temporary formal structure of politics and religion, respectively. Both helped to bring the spoken word to a new level of influence. Both significantly changed the style of speaking and writing, emphasizing the particular and immediate problems rather than abstract and general principles. And both gave a strong moral emphasis to their thoughts and actions. Burke's style has long been considered one of the outstanding models for English prose and oratory ...


6. Schiller And Romanticism, Robert L. Bloom, Basil L. Crapster, Harold A. Dunkelberger, Charles C. Glatfelter, Richard T. Mara, Norman E. Richardson, W. Richard Schubart Jan 1958

6. Schiller And Romanticism, Robert L. Bloom, Basil L. Crapster, Harold A. Dunkelberger, Charles C. Glatfelter, Richard T. Mara, Norman E. Richardson, W. Richard Schubart

Section XII: The Post-Enlightenment Period

To define romanticism is to attempt something which the romantics themselves insist cannot be done. But we can try to identify and then describe it, first pointing out what it is not. One stable element in romanticism has been its consistent rejection of its opposite, classicism. While no great piece of art has ever existed which did not contain elements of both romanticism and classicism, the partisans of these two different points of view have insisted that different emphases made it great. Where classicism emphasised analysis, objectivity harmony, wholeness, meaning, and discipline, romanticism stressed synthesis,subjectivity,disharmony, individuality,suggestiveness. and ...