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Full-Text Articles in English Language and Literature

Jane Eyre And Education, Cameron N. D'Amica Oct 2018

Jane Eyre And Education, Cameron N. D'Amica

Student Publications

Charlotte Brontë created the first female Bildungsroman in the English language when she wrote Jane Eyre in the mid-nineteenth century. Brontë’s novel explores the development of a young girl through her educational experiences. The main character, Jane Eyre, receives a formal education as a young orphan and eventually becomes both a teacher and a governess. Jane’s life never strays far from formal education, regardless of whether she is teaching or being taught. In each of Jane’s experiences, she learns invaluable lessons, both in and out of the classroom environment. Jane excels in the sphere of formal education ...


Jane Eyre And Education, Emma E. Gruner Oct 2016

Jane Eyre And Education, Emma E. Gruner

Student Publications

As the first female Bildungsroman in the English language, Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre focuses heavily on the theme of education. Throughout the course of the story, the character of Jane Eyre acquires a vast array of classical knowledge and ladylike accomplishments, facilitating her transition from a lowly student to a highly-respected teacher in true Bildungsroman fashion. Jane’s impressive scholarly abilities, however, contrast sharply with the deep struggles she undergoes as she pursues a much more difficult “education” in her personal beliefs. In the end, though, Jane masters both her mind and heart. Emboldened and liberated by her ...


The Return Of The Poor Man: Jude The Obscure And Late Victorian Socialism, Suzanne J. Flynn Mar 2016

The Return Of The Poor Man: Jude The Obscure And Late Victorian Socialism, Suzanne J. Flynn

English Faculty Publications

This essay examines Hardy's decision at the end of his career as a novelist to return to the "striking socialistic" themes which had defined his first (unpublished) novel. Jude the Obscure is Hardy's exploration of the spiritual and intellectual deprivation that attends the condition of the working-class poor. While the novel was reviled at the time as blatantly "anti-marriage," its fiercest polemic is reserved for the soul-destroying economic and social systems which continued to keep the class structure rigidly intact. While Hardy was never a socialist himself, his final novel has much in common with the numerous socialist ...