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Friends Of Musselman Library Newsletter Spring 2019, Musselman Library Apr 2019

Friends Of Musselman Library Newsletter Spring 2019, Musselman Library

Friends of Musselman Library Newsletter

From the Dean (Robin Wagner)

Library News

  • Don't Judge a book by its Cover: The Human Library
  • You Can Come Home Again!
  • Exhibits
  • Recalling WWII at Home (Devin McKinney and Micheal Birkner)
  • Library Works to Alleviate Textbook Misery (Janelle Wertzberger)
  • Books Sent to African Library (Piper O'Keefe '17)
  • Musselman Makeover

Paying it Forward (Sierra Green '11 and Olivia Simmet '18)

Student Paper Tops 1800 Downloads (Dayna Seeger '15)

Buy the Book

What's so Funny (Sunni DeNicola)

Book Displays Offer Outreach Opportunities (Sunni DeNicola)

Honor With Books

Data Drives Collecting Decisions

Rare Discovery: Signed 1st Edition by Adam ...


Charlotte Werbe, Assistant Professor Of French, Musselman Library, Charlotte Werbe Mar 2019

Charlotte Werbe, Assistant Professor Of French, Musselman Library, Charlotte Werbe

Next Page

In this Next Page column, Charlotte Werbe, Assistant Professor of French, shares her love of cinema and the films you should watch next, as well as the text that first inspired her research on the Holocaust and the challenging but important work of translating Holocaust memoirs.


Cocaine + Surfing: Reviewed By Jack Ryan, Gettysburg College, Jack Ryan Feb 2019

Cocaine + Surfing: Reviewed By Jack Ryan, Gettysburg College, Jack Ryan

English Faculty Publications

If you seek a conclusive answer to the question that seems to anchor Chas Smith's Cocaine + Surfing: A Sordid History of Surfing's Greatest Love Affair, "Did surfing and cocaine start together in Peru and never leave each other's embrace?," you will be disappointed. In his preface, Smith discusses the death of Andy Irons, the three-time world surfing champion from Hawaii who died November 2, 2010, alone in a Dallas hotel room of cardiac arrest brought on by cocaine abuse. Irons was thirty-two years old. According to Smith, no one in the cosseted surfing world was surprised: "Drugs ...


The Black Bruins: Reviewed By Jack Ryan, Gettysburg College, Jack Ryan Feb 2019

The Black Bruins: Reviewed By Jack Ryan, Gettysburg College, Jack Ryan

English Faculty Publications

Sergio Leone's Once Upon a Time in the West opens with a nearly wordless fifteen-minute sequence in which three gunmen do nothing more than wait for the arrival of a train at a remote frontier station. Leone, Dario Argento, and Bernardo Bertolucci constructed the film's screenplay out of portions of their favorite classic westerns, and the opening is a homage to High Noon; however, Leone's three gunmen look nothing like the actors in High Noon. Jack Elam and Al Mulock look like they emerged directly from the desiccated landscape surrounding them, and Woody Strode emits a dusty ...


Caroline Ferraris-Besso, Assistant Professor Of French, Musselman Library, Caroline Ferraris-Besso Feb 2019

Caroline Ferraris-Besso, Assistant Professor Of French, Musselman Library, Caroline Ferraris-Besso

Next Page

In this first column of the spring semester, Caroline Ferraris-Besso, Assistant Professor of French, shares which recent novel made her laugh out loud, her favorite cookbooks (and favorite brioche recipe!), and works that have inspired her academic writing.


Farah Ali, Visiting Assistant Professor Of Spanish, Musselman Library, Farah Ali Nov 2018

Farah Ali, Visiting Assistant Professor Of Spanish, Musselman Library, Farah Ali

Next Page

In this Next Page column, Farah Ali, Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish, shares why she celebrates “the good, the bad, and the weird” in her reading life, which writer’s grocery lists she would read if given the chance, and why it’s important to read outside of your comfort zone.


Jim Udden, Professor Of Cinema & Media Studies, Musselman Library, James N. Udden Oct 2018

Jim Udden, Professor Of Cinema & Media Studies, Musselman Library, James N. Udden

Next Page

In this Next Page column, we ask Jim Udden, Professor of Cinema & Media Studies, to talk books instead of films. Find out which authors make him laugh, his go-to source for reading about new books, and what he is planning to read as soon as his end-of-semester grading is complete.


The Poststructuralist Broom Of Wallace’S System: A Conversation Between Wittgenstein And Derrida, Vernon W. Cisney Oct 2018

The Poststructuralist Broom Of Wallace’S System: A Conversation Between Wittgenstein And Derrida, Vernon W. Cisney

Philosophy Faculty Publications

David Foster Wallace famously characterized his first novel, The Broom of the System, as ‘a conversation between [Ludwig] Wittgenstein and [Jacques] Derrida.’ This comes as little surprise, given the ubiquity of the question of language in the works of these two thinkers, and given the novel’s constant reflections on the relation between language and world. Broom’s protagonist, Lenore Beadsmen – in search of her eponymous great-grandmother – is preoccupied with the dread that ‘all that really exists of [her] life is what can be said about it,’ that is to say, that reality is entirely coextensive with language. If, as ...


Uncovering Shakespeare's Sisters In Special Collections And College Archives, Musselman Library, Suzanne J. Flynn, Lauren J. Browning, Madison G. Harvey, Hannah C. Lindert, Emma J. Poff, Cameron N. D'Amica, Teagan Lewis, Merlyn Maldonado Lopez, Audrey J. Nikolich, Mariah L. Beck, Phoebe M. Doscher, Chloe Dougherty, Hana Huskic, Samantha L. Burr, Elizabeth F. D'Arcangelo, Logan Shippee Oct 2018

Uncovering Shakespeare's Sisters In Special Collections And College Archives, Musselman Library, Suzanne J. Flynn, Lauren J. Browning, Madison G. Harvey, Hannah C. Lindert, Emma J. Poff, Cameron N. D'Amica, Teagan Lewis, Merlyn Maldonado Lopez, Audrey J. Nikolich, Mariah L. Beck, Phoebe M. Doscher, Chloe Dougherty, Hana Huskic, Samantha L. Burr, Elizabeth F. D'Arcangelo, Logan Shippee

Student Publications

Foreword by Professor Suzanne J. Flynn

I have taught the first-year seminar, Shakespeare’s Sisters, several times, and over the years I have brought the seminar’s students to the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. There, the wonderful librarians have treated the students to a special exhibit of early women’s manuscripts and first editions, beginning with letters written by Elizabeth I and proceeding through important works by seventeen and eighteenth-century women authors such as Aemelia Lanyer, Anne Finch, Aphra Behn, and Mary Wollstonecraft. This year I worked with Carolyn Sautter, the Director of Special Collections and College ...


Jane Eyre And Education, Cameron N. D'Amica Oct 2018

Jane Eyre And Education, Cameron N. D'Amica

Student Publications

Charlotte Brontë created the first female Bildungsroman in the English language when she wrote Jane Eyre in the mid-nineteenth century. Brontë’s novel explores the development of a young girl through her educational experiences. The main character, Jane Eyre, receives a formal education as a young orphan and eventually becomes both a teacher and a governess. Jane’s life never strays far from formal education, regardless of whether she is teaching or being taught. In each of Jane’s experiences, she learns invaluable lessons, both in and out of the classroom environment. Jane excels in the sphere of formal education ...


Jane Eyre: The Bridge Between Christianity And Folklore, Teagan Lewis Oct 2018

Jane Eyre: The Bridge Between Christianity And Folklore, Teagan Lewis

Student Publications

Charlotte Brontё’s acclaimed novel, Jane Eyre, was first marketed as an autobiography. The story, told from the point of view of a poor orphan girl, takes on a narrative similar to that of a fairytale. In this way, a reader may find difficulty in believing this novel to be a work of nonfiction. Charlotte Brontё employs aspects of both Christianity and fantasy in her novel not to discourage her readers from believing its validity but rather to emphasize how even poor orphan girls like Jane have forces of good guiding them. Jane Eyre is fictional, yet the hardships she ...


A Sign, Rachel M. Crowe Oct 2018

A Sign, Rachel M. Crowe

Student Publications

"A Sign" is a narrative about the experience of grief and how relationships are strengthened by shared experience. It tells the story of two different women who come together and inhabit a space of mutual understanding in the wake of their mother's death.


At The Edge Of Monstrosity: Melville, Shelley, And Crane’S Monsters In 19th-Century Literature, Jenna M. Seyer Oct 2018

At The Edge Of Monstrosity: Melville, Shelley, And Crane’S Monsters In 19th-Century Literature, Jenna M. Seyer

Student Publications

What is a monster? For contemporary readers, monsters conjure images of things from horror films. My capstone addresses the question of whether monsters, the monstrous, and monstrosity are inside the human or elsewhere. I argue that monsters, when compared side-by-side in literature, are fundamentally the same with some exceptions: evil behind a human body. Through close-reading and theoretical analyses of 19th-century texts, Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, and Stephen Crane’s The Monster, I examine how their authors create monsters as a response to societal anxieties and fears. My capstone expands on passages where human characters ...


Review Of Golem: Modern Wars And Their Monsters By Maya Barzilai, Temma F. Berg Sep 2018

Review Of Golem: Modern Wars And Their Monsters By Maya Barzilai, Temma F. Berg

English Faculty Publications

The golem crosses many borders. A popular culture icon and an enduring image of creative power, its hybridity contributes to its elusive nature. What it is and what it means shifts over time. Maya Barzilai's Golem: Modern Wars and Their Monsters takes a unique approach. Deeply interdisciplinary, as one must be to explore such a complex and paradoxical figure, and drawing on religious, literary, cinematic, and historical contexts, Barzilai weaves a rich tapestry of golem narratives. All the while, Barzilai keeps a clear eye on the golem's ongoing association with war, seeing its birth in the clay trenches ...


When Basketball Was Jewish, Jack Ryan Aug 2018

When Basketball Was Jewish, Jack Ryan

English Faculty Publications

Philosopher-novelist Rebecca Newberger Goldstein, writing in Jewish Jocks: An Unorthodox Hall of Fame, describes Barney "Tiny" Sedran, born Bernard Sedransky on the Lower East Side of New York, as a quintessential Jewish basketball player: "manically energetic, compulsively alert, upending expectations, and compensating for short—really short—comings" (17). Sedransky was the "shortest player ever inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame," she writes, who excelled at a time "when Jews ruled basketball — and lest you think those last three words are a misprint, let me repeat: Jews ruled basketball" (17). Indeed, in the modern era it is easy to forget ...


Jennifer Collins Bloomquist, Associate Provost For Faculty Development And Dean Of Social Sciences And Interdisciplinary Programs, Musselman Library, Jennifer Bloomquist Aug 2018

Jennifer Collins Bloomquist, Associate Provost For Faculty Development And Dean Of Social Sciences And Interdisciplinary Programs, Musselman Library, Jennifer Bloomquist

Next Page

In this first Next Page column of the new academic year, Jennifer Collins Bloomquist, Associate Provost for Faculty Development and Dean of Social Sciences and Interdisciplinary Programs, shares what she would ask Zora Neale Hurston if she had the chance, which food-related books she likes to give as gifts, why she can’t have anything fun to read at her house when she has a deadline looming, and her go-to campus sources for great recommendations on what to read next.


An Exploration Of Female Sexuality, Class Status, And Art In Hardy’S Short Stories, Erin M. Lanza Apr 2018

An Exploration Of Female Sexuality, Class Status, And Art In Hardy’S Short Stories, Erin M. Lanza

Student Publications

In this paper, I examine Hardy’s treatment of female sexuality as mediated by art in two short stories: “The Fiddler of the Reels” and “An Imaginative Woman.” Given Hardy’s role as an artist, his noted compassion for women, and his interest in Victorian attitudes toward sexuality, my analysis of these topics in his short stories is particularly relevant. Hardy’s investment in class issues is also pertinent, as I consider how Hardy uses his heroines’ relationships with art to underline the distinct disadvantages of lower-class women. While Ella, the middle-class heroine of “An Imaginative Woman,” uses poetry to ...


Maihan Wali, Class Of 2018, Musselman Library, Maihan Wali Mar 2018

Maihan Wali, Class Of 2018, Musselman Library, Maihan Wali

Next Page

In this new Next Page column, Maihan Wali, Class of 2018 and winner of this year’s Silent Leader Award, shares which writers have inspired her interests and activism in human rights and social justice issues, what she would ask author Khaled Hosseini if given the chance, which book she is looking forward to reading next, and much more.


Temma Berg, Professor Of English, Musselman Library, Temma F. Berg Feb 2018

Temma Berg, Professor Of English, Musselman Library, Temma F. Berg

Next Page

In this first Next Page column of 2018, Temma Berg, Professor of English, shares which texts have had a lasting influence on her teaching career and scholarship, how a chance meeting created a connection between her and one of her favorite childhood literary characters – Anne of Green Gables, which book she likes to give as a gift to friends who are retiring, and why she might just prefer to open another book rather than host a literary dinner party.


What About Susan? Gender In Narnia, Emma G. Schilling Oct 2017

What About Susan? Gender In Narnia, Emma G. Schilling

Student Publications

Critics of C.S. Lewis argue that his misogyny is present in his portrayal of female characters. While Lewis himself was self-contradictory in his attitudes towards women, his depictions of female characters in The Chronicles of Narnia are both realistic and progressive. Both the male and female characters throughout the series demonstrate individual strengths and weaknesses that are not dependent on their gender. The criticism against Lewis focuses on his treatment of Susan, especially regarding her being the only child not to return to Narnia at the end of the series. Unlike what the critics argue, however, Susan is not ...


Neurasthenia, Robert Graves, And Poetic Therapy In The Great War, Juliette E. Sebock Oct 2017

Neurasthenia, Robert Graves, And Poetic Therapy In The Great War, Juliette E. Sebock

Student Publications

Though Robert Graves is remembered primarily for his memoir, Good-bye to All That, his First World War poetry is equally relevant. Comparably to the more famous writings of Sassoon and Owen, Graves' war poems depict the trauma of the trenches, marked by his repressed neurasthenia (colloquially, shell-shock), and foreshadow his later remarkable poetic talents.


The Poetry Of Christina Rossetti And Dante Gabriel Rossetti: Same Femme, Different Fate, Carolyn A. Kirsch Oct 2017

The Poetry Of Christina Rossetti And Dante Gabriel Rossetti: Same Femme, Different Fate, Carolyn A. Kirsch

Student Publications

Siblings Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Christina Rossetti both lived during the Victorian era and wrote poetry which epitomizes the Pre-Raphaelite movement. Although they were related, these two poets were drastically different, and their differences are evident in their poetry. Dante Gabriel was infatuated with beautiful women and many of his poems express sexual desire, while Christina was intensely devoted to God and many of her poems provide moral instruction. However, these poets both make femme fatales the subjects of their poems “Body’s Beauty,” “The Card-Dealer,” “The World,” and “Babylon the Great.” This paper analyzes the different ways in which ...


Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Died Today. Or, Maybe, Yesterday; I Can't Be Sure..., Christopher R. Fee Sep 2017

Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Died Today. Or, Maybe, Yesterday; I Can't Be Sure..., Christopher R. Fee

English Faculty Publications

50 years on, Rosencrantz & Guildenstern are Dead continues to captivate and to entertain audiences with its darkly comic examination of existential themes of life, death, and indecision drawn from the pages, situations, and characters of Hamlet. First produced at the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 1966, the play opened at the Old Vic in London in 1967, and has been reprised there this season to rave reviews, with none other than Harry Potter in a leading role.


Review Of "Macho Row: The 1993 Phillies And Baseball's Unwritten Code", Jack Ryan Sep 2017

Review Of "Macho Row: The 1993 Phillies And Baseball's Unwritten Code", Jack Ryan

English Faculty Publications

This is a review of William C. Kashatus's Macho Row: The 1993 Phillies and Baseball's Unwritten Code, an account of the misfit bunch that almost returned World Series glory to the City of Brotherly Love.


Review Of "Masters Of The Games", Jack Ryan Aug 2017

Review Of "Masters Of The Games", Jack Ryan

English Faculty Publications

A review of Joseph Epstein's Masters of the Games, a collection of essays, profiles, short stories, and opinion pieces about sports.


Harry Potter And The Meaning Of Death, Harrison D. Brown Jul 2017

Harry Potter And The Meaning Of Death, Harrison D. Brown

Student Publications

The paper reviews how J.K. Rowling is able to examine death in the Harry Potter book series. In the first part of the text the author touches on the deaths of Harry's parents and the scarring that Harry receives from that, as well as an examination of how the deaths of others, from close friends to acquaintances, have affected Harry, specifically pertaining to his personal responsibility for them and also his grieving process. The paper also goes into how Voldemort's inability to feel love, paired with his fear of dying, have pushed his quest for immortality (using ...


The Iallt Language Center Evaluation Toolkit: Context, Development, And Usage, Elizabeth Lavolette, Angelika Kraemer May 2017

The Iallt Language Center Evaluation Toolkit: Context, Development, And Usage, Elizabeth Lavolette, Angelika Kraemer

Language Resource Center

In the summer of 2014, a committee composed of members of the International Association for Language Learning Technology (IALLT) began discussions toward accomplishing the following charge:

Design a tool that internal evaluation committees can use to evaluate and make recommendations for the improvement of their institution's language center. We emphasize the fact that it is the university appointed evaluation committee that will use this evaluation toolkit, not the language center directors themselves (although the LC Director should have input on how the toolkit should be deployed). Such evaluation committees might be composed of language department Chairs, TA/Language coordinators ...


In Solidarity, Musselman Library, Salma Monani, Sarah M. Principato, Dave Powell, Brent C. Talbot, Charles L. Weise, Bruce A. Larson, Scott Hancock, Mckinley E. Melton, David S. Walsh, Jennifer Q. Mccary, Kristina G. Chamberlin Apr 2017

In Solidarity, Musselman Library, Salma Monani, Sarah M. Principato, Dave Powell, Brent C. Talbot, Charles L. Weise, Bruce A. Larson, Scott Hancock, Mckinley E. Melton, David S. Walsh, Jennifer Q. Mccary, Kristina G. Chamberlin

Next Page

This edition of Next Page is a departure from our usual question and answer format with a featured campus reader. Instead, we asked speakers who participated in the College’s recent Student Solidarity Rally (March 1, 2017) to recommend readings that might further our understanding of the topics on which they spoke.


Béchamel, Jhanvi C. Ramaiya Apr 2017

Béchamel, Jhanvi C. Ramaiya

Student Publications

"In fluid, confident prose, this essay deftly moves through fascinating historical background on one of the ‘mother sauces’ and into a story of mother-to-daughter education before turning its focus to a story of learning through a blend of past teachings and independent experiences.” - Elissa Washuta, Author, Judge for the Virginia Woolf Essay Prize


The Mask Strikes Back: Blackness As Aporia In Moby-Dick And Benito Cereno, Jerome D. Clarke Apr 2017

The Mask Strikes Back: Blackness As Aporia In Moby-Dick And Benito Cereno, Jerome D. Clarke

Student Publications

What is the American Gothic a reaction to? Whereas other thinkers such as Nathaniel Hawthorne locates the building blocks of the American Gothic in Puritan Christianity or Amerindian Genocide, I argue that Melville posits the genesis of chattel slavery and the construction of racial category as the repressed events that haunt the Americas and return uninvited. By using the Gothic motif of the living corpse, the famed writer of Moby-Dick addresses the social bereavement which Blackness comes to represent in the Americas. By looking for truth on the skin and flesh, the main characters of Moby-Dick and “Benito Cereno” represent ...