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Literature in English, North America

2009

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Articles 1 - 30 of 78

Full-Text Articles in English Language and Literature

The Breath We Walk On, Sean Matthew Tribe Dec 2009

The Breath We Walk On, Sean Matthew Tribe

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

"The Breath We Walk On" is a collection of poems written during my time at UNLV, instructed by the poetic works of George Oppen, DH Lawrence, William Blake, Alice Notley, Walt Whitman, Allen Ginsberg and John Donne, as well as, The Greek Anthology, The Bible, and The Gnostic Gospels. The major ideas forming this collection detail issues of self in relation to the world. The poems that were most instructive from these books explore this idea in the best of their works. Other questions addressed are how can human beings live in a way that inflicts minimal harm to the ...


'Who Was It If It Wasn't Me?': The Problem Of Orientation In Alice Munro's 'Trespasses': A Cognitive Ecological Analysis, Nancy Easterlin Oct 2009

'Who Was It If It Wasn't Me?': The Problem Of Orientation In Alice Munro's 'Trespasses': A Cognitive Ecological Analysis, Nancy Easterlin

English Faculty Publications

No abstract provided.


Listen: A Close Reading Of Vonnegut, Elizabeth Zaretsky '10 Oct 2009

Listen: A Close Reading Of Vonnegut, Elizabeth Zaretsky '10

2009 Fall Semester

Listen: Billy Pilgrim has come unstuck in time. Billy has gone to sleep a senile widower and awakened on his wedding day. He has walked through a door in 1955 and come out another one in 1941. He has gone back through that door to find himself in 1963. He has seen his death and birth many times, he says, and pays random visits to all the events in between. (Slaughterhouse-Five, pg 23)

Kurt Vonnegut has long been respected as a master of the written word. In this passage, he uses a specific tense, repetition, and clause arrangement to portray ...


Interpreting Meteors, Weeds, And Sunshine: Acts Of God In The Scarlet Letter, Eleanor Cory '12 Oct 2009

Interpreting Meteors, Weeds, And Sunshine: Acts Of God In The Scarlet Letter, Eleanor Cory '12

2009 Fall Semester

In recent years, many occurrences—from hurricanes to medical rarities to pictures on pieces of toast—have been labeled acts of God. Those who disagree attribute this association to the idea that people read what they want into a situation. Similar comparisons were made in the time of the Puritans, although theirs tended to be taken more seriously and often held authority in government or court. Still, the idea that these “messages from God” are subconsciously interpreted to fit personal beliefs can also be applied to those of Massachusetts Bay. In his novel The Scarlet Letter, Nathaniel Hawthorne shows that ...


Abandon Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn: Why Bother?, Johnny Duan '12 Oct 2009

Abandon Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn: Why Bother?, Johnny Duan '12

2009 Fall Semester

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn has been an incendiary novel for decades; it has raised controversy in schools for at least half a century (Kim 1). Many have sought to remove it from literature classes, for various reasons, whether because of its racism, improper language, or alleged corrupting affects (Liechty). These arguments have not convinced the public to ban this book; none of the arguments used have been effective. There is no reason for us to break this trend.


Selecting Three Poems By W. Stevens: A Roundtable Discussion, Alan Filreis Oct 2009

Selecting Three Poems By W. Stevens: A Roundtable Discussion, Alan Filreis

Poetics Studies Papers

Three poems by Stevens indicate a particular aesthetic predicament, expressions of near-cessation: "Mozart, 1935," "The Man with the Blue Guitar," and "The Plain Sense of Things." In the third poem, the imagination re-emerges at precisely the point of its termination. In the second, the poet ventures into pure sound just when an ideological model for the poem collapses. In the first, the poem is the result of a dodge on the matter of others' pain.


The Man From Main Street: Bringing Sinclair Lewis Into The 21st Century, Thomas D. Steman Oct 2009

The Man From Main Street: Bringing Sinclair Lewis Into The 21st Century, Thomas D. Steman

Library Faculty Publications

This article highlights efforts to digitize and make available primary resources of Sinclair Lewis available at the St. Cloud State University Archives. Material included 262 letters of Sinclair Lewis to Marcella Powers, 1939-1947, and drafts, 1933-1934, of the Sinclair Lewis and Lloyd Lewis Broadway play Jayhawker.


A Place, Near Water, Kaitlin Mcclanahan Aug 2009

A Place, Near Water, Kaitlin Mcclanahan

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

My thesis represents the crux of my goal in coming to UNLV: to begin and successfully complete the first half of a novel that I have spent years developing. I attribute much of my success to the dedication I have learned in pushing through the MFA program with the help of my advisors, and will leave the program with enough vision to complete the novel I have begun.

My novel tells the story of a fictional Pacific Northwest town circa WWII. The novel begins with the discovery of a body.It then goes back in time and follows the lives ...


Till, Jonathan Peter Moore Aug 2009

Till, Jonathan Peter Moore

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

till is a collection of poetry exclusively composed while the poet was a graduate student in the Creative Writing International Master of Fine Arts program at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The manuscript includes ekphrastic reflections on William Eggleston's Guide and confronts regionalism, religion and past/present subjectivity.


Crack In The Doorway, Tawnysha Greene Jul 2009

Crack In The Doorway, Tawnysha Greene

English Publications and Other Works

"Crack in the Doorway" is a poem in which a young girl watches her grandmother live her last days.


"That I Could Look ... On My Own Crucifixion And Bloody Crowning": Walt Whitman's Anti-Gallows Writing And The Appeal To Christian Sympathy, Paul Christian Jones Jul 2009

"That I Could Look ... On My Own Crucifixion And Bloody Crowning": Walt Whitman's Anti-Gallows Writing And The Appeal To Christian Sympathy, Paul Christian Jones

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

Traces “Whitman’s involvement in the anti-capital punishment movement . . . from his impassioned anti-gallows editorials for various periodicals to his transference of these expressions” into Leaves of Grass, “especially in terms of his arguments for sympathy for condemned criminals and his use of the rhetoric of ‘Christian sympathy,’ a rhetoric very common in antebellum anti-gallows arguments.”


Useful Antagonists: Transatlantic Influence, Sectionalism, And Whitman's Nationalist Project, Samuel Graber Jul 2009

Useful Antagonists: Transatlantic Influence, Sectionalism, And Whitman's Nationalist Project, Samuel Graber

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

Argues that, “faced with a splintering American nation and the possibility of a militarized Mason-Dixon line, the antebellum Whitman conceived of the Atlantic as the single relevant national border,” leading him—“in an improbable bid to exchange sectionalism for Anglophobia”—to attack “the obstacles of sectionalism and transatlantic influence by treating them as part of the same problem, building his reputation as an authentically American writer through a strategic conflation of sectionalist and transatlantic pressures”; examines how Whitman’s antislavery writings “pass over the South as the primary object of criticism, and . . . draw the transatlantic scene from the periphery to ...


Announcements, Summer 2009 Jul 2009

Announcements, Summer 2009

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Back Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.1 Jul 2009

Back Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.1

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Front Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.1 Jul 2009

Front Matter, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review, V.27, No.1

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Tolerance And Elimination In Whitman's "Land Of All Ideas": A Complex Prose Manuscript And A Previously Unknown Letter Fragment, Kenneth M. Price Jul 2009

Tolerance And Elimination In Whitman's "Land Of All Ideas": A Complex Prose Manuscript And A Previously Unknown Letter Fragment, Kenneth M. Price

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

Reproduces a previously unpublished Reconstruction-era Whitman prose manuscript, with, on one side, two paragraphs of a partial draft of the first installment of Whitman’s New York Weekly Graphic series, “’Tis But Ten Years Since,” and on the other side a fragment of a previously unknown letter; analyzes ways that the manuscript allows us to understand Whitman’s attack on extremism, whether it originated in the North or South.


Petroleum V. Nasby, Poet Of Democracy, And His "Psalm Of Gladness", Jon Miller Jul 2009

Petroleum V. Nasby, Poet Of Democracy, And His "Psalm Of Gladness", Jon Miller

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

Reprints David Ross Locke’s parodic letter-poem (written in the persona of “whiskey-addicted Copperhead” Petroleum V. Nasby), “A Psalm of Gladness—The Veto of the Civil Rights Bill, and other Matters, occasioning a Feeling of Thankfulness in the Minds of the Democracy,” and analyzes how the satire “associates Nasby’s style of ‘jubilation’ with the poetry of Walt Whitman,” showing how “the satire does not attack Whitman’s verse so much as it condemns it by association with the style of Nasby.”


"My Dear Comrade Frederickus": Walt Whitman And Fred Gray, Stephanie M. Blalock Jul 2009

"My Dear Comrade Frederickus": Walt Whitman And Fred Gray, Stephanie M. Blalock

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

Offers detailed biographical information (and two photographs) of Whitman’s close friend, Fred Gray, and examines the nature of what Whitman called the “Fred Gray Association,” “a circle of New York comrades,” some of them “highly literate and upwardly mobile,” who frequented Pfaff’s beer hall and had “ties to the nearby New York Hospital”; traces Whitman’s continuing associations with Gray and his associates throughout the poet’s life.


A Previous Unknown 1855 Albion Notice: Whitman Outed As His Own Reviewer, Ed Folsom Jul 2009

A Previous Unknown 1855 Albion Notice: Whitman Outed As His Own Reviewer, Ed Folsom

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

Examines a previously unrecorded notice of the first edition of Leaves of Grass published in the September 8, 1855, issue of The Albion, which “becomes the earliest known outing of Whitman as a writer of his own reviews”; goes on to discuss the history of Whitman writing reviews of his own work.


Walt Whitman: A Current Bibliography, Summer 2009, Ed Folsom Jul 2009

Walt Whitman: A Current Bibliography, Summer 2009, Ed Folsom

Walt Whitman Quarterly Review

No abstract provided.


Cooper's Green World: Adapting Ecosemiotics To The Mythic Eastern Woodlands, Alf Siewers Jul 2009

Cooper's Green World: Adapting Ecosemiotics To The Mythic Eastern Woodlands, Alf Siewers

Faculty Contributions to Books

James Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales situated in a Trans-Atlantic Green World tradition of Anglophone literature, related also to Native American culture.


American Studies, Cultural History, And The Critique Of Culture, Richard S. Lowry Jul 2009

American Studies, Cultural History, And The Critique Of Culture, Richard S. Lowry

Arts & Sciences Articles

For several decades historians have expressed reservations about how scholars of American studies have embraced theory and its jargons. The program for a recent American studies convention seems to confirm the field’s turn from history and its embrace of the paradigms and practices of cultural studies. The nature of this gap is complicated by comparing scholarly work published since 2000 on the Gilded Age and Progressive Era in the respective flagship journals of each field. Scholars in both fields are committed to the study of culture, but they differ in how they understand historical agency and subjectivity. A historical ...


Interview Of John J. Seydow, Ph.D., John J. Seydow, Frank Hopper Jun 2009

Interview Of John J. Seydow, Ph.D., John J. Seydow, Frank Hopper

All Oral Histories

John J. Seydow was born and raised in Olney section of Philadelphia. He was educated in Philadelphia’s Parochial School System from kindergarten through high school. He graduated from Cardinal Dougherty High School in June of 1959. He attended La Salle College on a full time basis from September 1961 through May 1965. He majored in English at La Salle and received his Bachelors degree in May of 1965. The following September he began a graduate fellowship at Ohio University where he earned his Masters and Doctorial degrees in English by May of 1968. In August 1968, he returned to ...


Wraith Walking, Jason Coley May 2009

Wraith Walking, Jason Coley

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

With this work I wanted to explore the space between memory and imagination: namely, how much imagination fills the fissures that run though our knowledge of our past. The protagonist, Joshua, has been estranged from his family for nine years and learns of his father's death while in China. But without explanation, Joshua is awaken one morning by an old fabrication of his childhood imagination--a character now very real--who accompanies Joshua on his search for a fantastical object.

Pareidolia is the phenomenon of seeing figures and faces in vague stimulus, such as clouds and wood grains. It is commonly ...


Circuit Rider, Kimberley Harris Idol May 2009

Circuit Rider, Kimberley Harris Idol

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

An historical novel set at the end of the American Civil War focusing on the week between President Lincoln's assassination and John Wilkes Booth's death. The backdrop of the story is comprised of the historical events and political figures that shaped this period in time in America. The plot is also configured around the fictional histories of three young souls, the spirit of a murdered Chinese immigrant girl, and a brother and sister who's home in the Appalachians was destroyed during the war. All three are escaping the devastating consequences of the war and seeking a new ...


"Divine William" And The Master: The Influence Of Shakespeare On The Novels Of Henry James, Amy M. Green May 2009

"Divine William" And The Master: The Influence Of Shakespeare On The Novels Of Henry James, Amy M. Green

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Henry James's most sustained commentary on Shakespeare comes in the form of an introduction to an edition of The Tempest that was published in 1907. In it, he remarks that the play is a reflection of Shakespeare "consciously tasting of the first and rarest of his gifts, that of imaged creative Expression...to show him as unresistingly aware" (1207). This praise ties unerringly back to James's praise of the artist as one who views the world through open eyes and can capture the nuance of experience. James himself worked at the craft of fiction, and writes extensively in ...


Nathaniel Hawthorne And His Biblical Contexts, Conor Michael Walsh May 2009

Nathaniel Hawthorne And His Biblical Contexts, Conor Michael Walsh

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

The majority of criticism and scholarship devoted to the fiction of Nathaniel Hawthorne takes for granted the relationship between Hawthorne and the Bible, focusing instead upon theology and philosophy. This work proposes that the Bible was an important and pervasive influence in Hawthorne's fiction. The Bible provides Hawthorne with numerous resources for both his artistic and moral concerns. At a basic level the Bible provides a popular platform that allows Hawthorne to immediately connect with his contemporary audience who were intimately familiar with the Bible. More importantly, though, are the vast examples and perspectives of the human condition and ...


An Examination Of William Faulkner's Use Of Biblical Symbolism In Three Early Novels: The Sound And The Fury, As I Lay Dying, And Light In August, Richard North Apr 2009

An Examination Of William Faulkner's Use Of Biblical Symbolism In Three Early Novels: The Sound And The Fury, As I Lay Dying, And Light In August, Richard North

Masters Theses

During the years 1928-1932, William Faulkner wrote and published three novels containing varying but significant amounts of Biblical content and symbolism: The Sound and the Fury (1929), As I Lay Dying (1930), and Light in August (1932). In The Sound and the Fury, the characters of Benjy and Quentin Compson share some characteristics of Christ figures, but receive irony-laden treatment. The novel, however, presents the purest Christian character of this period of Faulkner's writing--the Compson family's Negro servant Dilsey. The Bible holds a similar influence over As I Lay Dying, specifically in the Old Testament. The Christian characters ...


The Nelson Slade Bond Collection At Marshall University, Nat Debruin, Lisle Brown, Andrew Earles Apr 2009

The Nelson Slade Bond Collection At Marshall University, Nat Debruin, Lisle Brown, Andrew Earles

Nat DeBruin

Nelson Slade Bond had a varied writing career that spanned 70 years. Primarily known for science fiction short stories, Bond also wrote plays, radio and television scripts, newspaper and magazine articles, poetry, public relations material, and books. The collection reflects the author's professional and personal lives consisting of writings, correspondence, business papers and financial records from 1925 to 2005. The collection has approximately 370 magazines containing stories published by Nelson Bond. Although Bond wrote detective and sport stories, he is primarily known as a science fiction and fantasy author from the Golden Age of science fiction contemporary to authors ...


The Nelson Slade Bond Collection At Marshall University, Nat Debruin, Lisle Brown, Andrew Earles Apr 2009

The Nelson Slade Bond Collection At Marshall University, Nat Debruin, Lisle Brown, Andrew Earles

Lisle G Brown

Nelson Slade Bond had a varied writing career that spanned 70 years. Primarily known for science fiction short stories, Bond also wrote plays, radio and television scripts, newspaper and magazine articles, poetry, public relations material, and books. The collection reflects the author's professional and personal lives consisting of writings, correspondence, business papers and financial records from 1925 to 2005. The collection has approximately 370 magazines containing stories published by Nelson Bond. Although Bond wrote detective and sport stories, he is primarily known as a science fiction and fantasy author from the Golden Age of science fiction contemporary to authors ...