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Articles 1 - 16 of 16

Full-Text Articles in Dutch Studies

Multilingual Moomins: Examining The Translation Of Tove Jansson’S Nonsense Character Names From Swedish To English And Finnish, Janine A E Strandberg Jan 2019

Multilingual Moomins: Examining The Translation Of Tove Jansson’S Nonsense Character Names From Swedish To English And Finnish, Janine A E Strandberg

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka Jan 2019

Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Mapping Colonial Interdependencies In Dutch Brazil: European Linen & Brasilianen Identity, Carrie Anderson Nov 2018

Mapping Colonial Interdependencies In Dutch Brazil: European Linen & Brasilianen Identity, Carrie Anderson

Artl@s Bulletin

In Dutch Brazil, the Brasilianen were essential allies to the West India Company. To maintain this critical alliance, the Dutch presented them with gifts of linen, a fabric in high demand. Representations of Brasilianen wearing linen garments were pervasive and include an image on Joan Blaeu’s 1647 map of the Brazilian Captaincies of Rio Grande and Paraíba. Traditional interpretations of these linen-clad Brasilianen prioritize a center/periphery model; in contrast, I argue that these pictured linens document the interdependencies between the WIC and the Brasilianen, a position supported by digital maps plotting Dutch/indigenous exchanges.


Keeping Our Eyes Open: Visualizing Networks And Art History, Stephanie Porras Nov 2017

Keeping Our Eyes Open: Visualizing Networks And Art History, Stephanie Porras

Artl@s Bulletin

Network visualizations have the potential to translate messy archival work into clouds of connection, powerful maps of relations that can reveal hidden agents or nodes of production. But network visualizations must also be understood as artifacts of our own visual culture, laden with the biases and limits of both past and present knowledge systems. Rather than seeing networks as uniform webs of connection, social network analysis must productively interrogate how biopolitical, cultural and social power are manifested within these visualizations, reinforcing the biases and lacunae of the archive.


Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella May 2017

Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Dutch Landscape Painting: Documenting Globalization And Environmental Imagination, Irene J. Klaver Dec 2014

Dutch Landscape Painting: Documenting Globalization And Environmental Imagination, Irene J. Klaver

Proceedings from the Document Academy

There is an old saying that God made the Earth, but the Dutch made the Netherlands; they did this by engineering relationships of the water and land.

The Dutch landscape is an authored landscape documenting human reaction to geological, economic, and cultural changes. As a consequence of Dutch globalization, landscape painting arose as a new form of painting, documenting these changes and reactions to them. In a period of newly created land, reclaimed and constructed by sheer human activity, the explicit construction of new environments apparently elicited an implicit desire to hold on to an older, familiar traditional landscape. The ...


Conscience's De Leeuw Van Vlaanderen (The Lion Of Flanders) And Its Adaptation To Film By Claus, Gertjan Willems Sep 2014

Conscience's De Leeuw Van Vlaanderen (The Lion Of Flanders) And Its Adaptation To Film By Claus, Gertjan Willems

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "Conscience's De Leeuw van Vlaanderen (The Lion of Flanders) and Its Adaptation to Film by Claus" Gertjan Willems discusses Hugo Claus's 1984 filmic adaptation of Hendrik Conscience's 1838 historical novel, a landmark in the history of the Flemish Movement. Willems's analysis is executed by means of a textual film analysis and archival research. Willems pays special attention to the Flemish-Dutch coproduction's complex relations with the national question. Despite various difficulties concerning Flemish nationalist sensitivities of the project, the producers wanted the film to be as faithful as possible to Conscience's novel ...


Babette's Feast And The Goodness Of God, Thomas J. Curry Oct 2012

Babette's Feast And The Goodness Of God, Thomas J. Curry

Journal of Religion & Film

This article attempts to answer the preeminent question Babette’s Feast invites viewers to consider: Why does Babette choose to expend everything she has to make her feast? Of the critical studies made of the film, few have considered analytically crucial the catastrophic backstory of Babette, the violence of which is implied and offscreen. Appreciation of the singularity of Babette’s own personhood and the darker aspects of her experience, and not only how she might act as a figure of Christ, are key to understanding the motivating force behind her meal and its transformative effect: That through the feast ...


‘Epistemic Coyotismo’ And Transnational Collaboration: Decolonizing The Danish University, Julia Suárez-Krabbe Jan 2012

‘Epistemic Coyotismo’ And Transnational Collaboration: Decolonizing The Danish University, Julia Suárez-Krabbe

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

In the Danish university, outlooks on the countries of the South and issues of development are strongly conditioned by hegemonic perspectives marked by coloniality. Although, in an era of neoliberal university reform, decolonial critique of dominant forms and institutions of knowledge is a marginal pursuit, the author draws on the experience of the collective Andar Descolonizando, based at Roskilde University, to suggest some ways in which decolonizing critique can be trained on the university institution itself and its “position within global articulations of power.” Such critical work, aiming in particular at epistemic racism, can be accomplished through what the author ...


About Them, But Without Them: Race And Ethnic Relations Studies In Dutch Universities, Kwame Nimako Jan 2012

About Them, But Without Them: Race And Ethnic Relations Studies In Dutch Universities, Kwame Nimako

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

On the basis of direct experience in the Dutch university system, the author analyses the ways in which knowledge about ethnic minorities—so-called “minority research”—has been hegemonized by dominant elites who view minorities as problem populations and seek to manage minority problems in such a way as to minimize them and never question their own domination nor the historical heritage of colonialism and slavery. He describes several initiatives undertaken—mainly outside the university—by minority groups to re-examine race and ethnic relations and the history of slavery and abolition, including the National Platform on the Legacy of Slavery, the ...


Decolonizing The Mind: The Case Of The Netherlands, Sandew Hira Jan 2012

Decolonizing The Mind: The Case Of The Netherlands, Sandew Hira

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

In a militant context, the author examines certain dominant historical narratives regarding slavery and abolition produced and disseminated in the Dutch university and Dutch governmental institutions. He denounces their ideological and non-scientific approaches and in particular their strong tendency to understate or deny the oppressive character of slavery and the responsibility of Dutch ruling classes in its promotion and in mystifying the historical factors that explain abolition.


Slavery, Colonialism And Their Legacy In The Eurocentric University: The Case Of Britain And The Netherlands, Stephen Small Jan 2012

Slavery, Colonialism And Their Legacy In The Eurocentric University: The Case Of Britain And The Netherlands, Stephen Small

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Drawing inspiration from the critique by Patricia Hill Collins of the “Eurocentric, masculinist knowledge-validation process,” the author examines various ways in which universities, both in Britain and the U.S., have long suppressed critical inquiry into the history of empire, slavery and the slave trade. Parallel to this critique, he examines museums and other memorial sites devoted to slavery in Britain and the U.S., including a small number of initiatives that challenge hegemonic accounts and draw attention to the agency and the resistance of the enslaved. He further draws attention to initiatives within academic institutions in the U.S ...


Danishness, Nordic Amnesia And Immigrant Museums, Lia Paula Rodrigues Jan 2011

Danishness, Nordic Amnesia And Immigrant Museums, Lia Paula Rodrigues

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Museums’ images and narratives play an active role in the construction of collective memories. Since collective memories are integral to the politics of social and group identity, most of the controversy surrounding museums’ representational practices depart from the question of who “owns” memory and what form of remembrance ought to be presented (Prosise 2003). Through an exploration of the Danish Immigration Museum’s website, in this article the author discusses the dynamics existent between DIM’s representational practices and its politics of exhibiting other cultures. In order to render intelligible such dynamics, the politics of remembrance (of particular cultural elements ...


Representation Of Africa And The African Diaspora In European Museums, Artwell Cain Jan 2011

Representation Of Africa And The African Diaspora In European Museums, Artwell Cain

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Museums in Europe have a tradition of marginalizing the image and narrative of persons from the African Diaspora. This is often evident in the frequency of appearances and the quality of these scarce productions. Another point of interest is the manner in which these productions are presented. On the one hand, several questions arise regarding the representation of the African after the abolishment of chattel slavery right up to this present age of emancipation. Who gathers and presents these cultural artifacts? Which criteria are applied during the gathering and production of these presentations? Which sorts of museums are inclined to ...


Fundamentally Danish?: The Muhammad Cartoon Crisis As Transitional Drama, Heiko Henkel Jan 2010

Fundamentally Danish?: The Muhammad Cartoon Crisis As Transitional Drama, Heiko Henkel

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

A closer look at the Muhammad cartoon crisis illuminates some of the key issues that were, and continue to be, at stake for the various actors in the public contestations over the legitimate place of Muslims (and the Islamic tradition) in Danish society. Using a conceptual framework developed by Axel Honneth, I suggest in this article that the cartoon crisis is part of an ongoing struggle for recognition in Denmark, through which the terms by which Muslims residing in Denmark are recognized as legitimate citizens/residents of Danish society are negotiated—and on which Muslims may recognize the demands of ...


Black Skin, White Masks Revisited: Contemporary Post-Colonial Dilemmas In The Netherlands, France, And Belgium, Eric Mielants Jun 2007

Black Skin, White Masks Revisited: Contemporary Post-Colonial Dilemmas In The Netherlands, France, And Belgium, Eric Mielants

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Several problems beset the immigrant communities and academic scholarship in Belgium, France, and the Netherlands. The current politicization of higher education--who gets tenure or governmental financial support for what kind of social science research--results in timid criticism of existing public policies. The greatly differential integration models used in the Netherlands, Belgium, and France have resulted in different ways of collecting data and analyzing the 'other.' This article addresses how divergent discourses about the 'other' have been constructed over time: according to the French assimilationist model, ethnic minorities do not (officially) 'exist'; the Netherlands, until recently, embraced a 'tolerant' multi-cultural model ...