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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Dutch Studies

Multilingual Moomins: Examining The Translation Of Tove Jansson’S Nonsense Character Names From Swedish To English And Finnish, Janine A E Strandberg Jan 2019

Multilingual Moomins: Examining The Translation Of Tove Jansson’S Nonsense Character Names From Swedish To English And Finnish, Janine A E Strandberg

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka Jan 2019

Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


To Save A Soul? Analyzing Hieronymus Bosch’S Death And The Miser, Ryan Bilger Oct 2018

To Save A Soul? Analyzing Hieronymus Bosch’S Death And The Miser, Ryan Bilger

Student Publications

The Dutch painter Hieronymus Bosch remains to this day one of the most famous artists of the Northern Renaissance. His unique style and fantastical images have made him an icon beyond his years. Bosch’s painting Death and the Miser, now in the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., stands out as one of his most thematically complex paintings, packed with pertinent details and allusions to other works of his and those created by other artists. His inclusion of various demonic creatures, the figure of Death, and an angel and crucifix create a tense atmosphere surrounding the passing ...


Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella May 2017

Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Cornelius Aurelius: The Upcycling Humanist - A Study Of The Libellus De Patientia, Samantha James Jan 2013

Cornelius Aurelius: The Upcycling Humanist - A Study Of The Libellus De Patientia, Samantha James

Theses and Dissertations (Comprehensive)

Cornelius Aurelius’ Libellus de Patientia (MS Leiden, UB, Vulcanius 66 f.45r-f.57v. [1524]), in terms of the author’s reception of the Manipulus florum, reveals much about the development of Northern Humanism, in the context of late medieval scholasticism and the Reformation. By thoroughly examining Libellus de Patientia, this paper will discuss Aurelius’ use of numerous quotations derived from the Manipulus florum as evidence of how this text should be situated in terms of intellectual continuity vs. change during this turbulent period with regards to the intellectual context of medieval scholasticism and renaissance humanism.