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Poetry Commons

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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Poetry

Acknowledgements/Image Credits, Molly Lynde-Recchia Dec 2014

Acknowledgements/Image Credits, Molly Lynde-Recchia

Transference

No abstract provided.


The Eighth Eclogue By Vergil, Ann Lauinger Dec 2014

The Eighth Eclogue By Vergil, Ann Lauinger

Transference

Translated from the Latin with commentary by Ann Lauinger.


The Fisherman By Anonymous, Luke J. Chambers Dec 2014

The Fisherman By Anonymous, Luke J. Chambers

Transference

Translated from the Old French with commentary by Luke Chambers.


On The Tomb Of A Great Beauty By Claudian, Brett Foster Dec 2014

On The Tomb Of A Great Beauty By Claudian, Brett Foster

Transference

Translated from the Latin with commentary by Brett Foster.


Foreword, David Kutzko, Molly Lynde-Recchia Dec 2014

Foreword, David Kutzko, Molly Lynde-Recchia

Transference

Thoughts on the second volume by editors-in-chief David Kutzko and Molly Lynde-Recchia.


Transference Vol. 2, Fall 2014, Molly Lynde-Recchia Dec 2014

Transference Vol. 2, Fall 2014, Molly Lynde-Recchia

Transference

Transference is published by the Department of World Languages and Literatures at Western Michigan University. Dedicated to the celebration of poetry in translation, the journal publishes translations from Arabic, Chinese, French and Old French, German, classical Greek, Latin, and Japanese, into English verse. Transference contains translations as well as commentaries on the art and process of translating.


Private Speech, Public Pain: The Power Of Women's Laments In Ancient Greek Poetry And Tragedy, Olivia Dunham Nov 2014

Private Speech, Public Pain: The Power Of Women's Laments In Ancient Greek Poetry And Tragedy, Olivia Dunham

CrissCross

Women’s discourse in Greek society has been traditionally controlled and restricted by strict sociocultural codes. Barred from participating in the exclusively male public political scene, women have developed another mode of expressing their concerns and opinions about the world around them-through performance of ritual laments. In these songs of mourning women are empowered through their pain to address publicly issues of social importance; the most successful performers skillfully weave sometimes abrasive, often persuasive, and always highly charged judicial and political language into their lament. Women use this medium of public mourning as a protected vehicle through which they pronounce ...