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Articles 1 - 30 of 35

Full-Text Articles in Creative Writing

The Place Where You Are, Gabriel O'Malley Feb 2016

The Place Where You Are, Gabriel O'Malley

New England Journal of Public Policy

We moved to 21 Sparks Street in Cambridge in 1974. A bright yellow triple decker with a red door, it stood at the head of a dead end populated by worker cottages that had once been home to servants who worked up the road on Brattle Street. It housed three women. The oldest, Mrs. Crowley, ancient even then, lived on the third floor. Her daughter, Louise, known to me forever as Mrs. Sughrue, lived on the second floor with her adult daughter, Cathy. Before renting the first floor apartment to my parents, Mrs. Sughrue invited them up to her place ...


Good-Bye To All That: The Rise And Demise Of Irish America (1993), Shaun O’Connell Nov 2015

Good-Bye To All That: The Rise And Demise Of Irish America (1993), Shaun O’Connell

New England Journal of Public Policy

The works discussed in this article include: The Rascal King: The Life and Times of James Michael Curley 1874-1958, by Jack Beatty; JFK: Reckless Youth, by Nigel Hamilton; Textures of Irish America, by Lawrence J. McCaffrey; and Militant and Triumphant: William Henry O'Connell and the Catholic Church in Boston, by James M. O'Toole.

Reprinted from New England Journal of Public Policy 9, no. 1 (1993), article 9.


Wars Remembered (2003), Shaun O’Connell Nov 2015

Wars Remembered (2003), Shaun O’Connell

New England Journal of Public Policy

O'Connell speaks about his father, among other war veterans, dealing with the effects of the wars they fought in. He explains his father's history from how he enilisted to how he died. He also touches upon other's war experiences and writing about the after effects of them as well.

Reprinted from New England Journal of Public Policy 19, no. 1 (2003), article 3.


Important Places (2005), Shaun O’Connell Nov 2015

Important Places (2005), Shaun O’Connell

New England Journal of Public Policy

The author talks about his time and associations with the University of Massachusetts Boston. He also describes Ireland and his family's roots there and how it connects with Boston as well as his life in New York.

Reprinted from New England Journal of Public Policy 20, no. 2 (2005), article 10.


Appointment At Bu Dop, Brian Wright O'Connor Sep 2013

Appointment At Bu Dop, Brian Wright O'Connor

New England Journal of Public Policy

Brian O’Connor writes about his father, who was killed in Viet Nam. He methodically documents his father’s battle with Viet Cong forces, recreates the circumstances that led to his death, and describes his unquenchable to-the-death devotion to his squad. Lieutenant Colonel Mortimer Lenane O’Connor, the son concludes, was “a gung-ho infantry officer, a West Pointer with a sense of gallows humor who believed that large-force engagements were the quickest way to conclude the war.” Earlier this year the University of Pennsylvania awarded his father posthumously a doctorate for the thesis he was working on when he put ...


On Dumpster Diving, Lars Eighner Mar 2013

On Dumpster Diving, Lars Eighner

New England Journal of Public Policy

Lars Eighner became homeless in 1988 after leaving a job he had held for ten years as an attendant at a state hospital in Austin, Texas. He lives in a small apartment in Austin and continues to scavenge. This article was originally published in the Fall 1990 issue of The Threepenny Review. Reprinted with permission.

This article originally appeared in a 1992 issue of the New England Journal of Public Policy (Volume 8, Issue 1): http://scholarworks.umb.edu/nejpp/vol8/iss1.


Amosquito, Jan Dednam Sep 2001

Amosquito, Jan Dednam

New England Journal of Public Policy

The author describes his encounter with the culture as well as the history of Johannesburg as well as talks about a man names Amos.


A Corner Of Maine, Richard Card Sep 2001

A Corner Of Maine, Richard Card

New England Journal of Public Policy

The author talks about his grandfather and the memories he had of him as a child. He speaks of his grampy's war time and the cottage he would visit.


The Fountain, Edie Shillhue Sep 2000

The Fountain, Edie Shillhue

New England Journal of Public Policy

In “The Fountain,” we revive a tradition dating back to the earliest days of the journal. Edie Shillue spent a year living in Northern Ireland, wandering the streets of Derry and Belfast, the byways of the villages and the country towns, enjoying the “crack,” tossing back more than the odd pint of Guinness — and taking it all in, filling notebook after notebook with her keen observations and acute insights — definitely a different view of the conflict in Northern Ireland, but fastidious to a fault. We hope that the tradition of publishing original works of literature once revived will continue to ...


Good-Bye To All That: The Rise And Demise Of Irish America, Shaun O'Connell Jun 1993

Good-Bye To All That: The Rise And Demise Of Irish America, Shaun O'Connell

New England Journal of Public Policy

The works discussed in this article include: The Rascal King: The Life and Times of James Michael Curley 1874-1958, by Jack Beatty; JFK: Reckless Youth, by Nigel Hamilton; Textures of Irish America, by Lawrence J. McCaffrey; and Militant and Triumphant: William Henry O'Connell and the Catholic Church in Boston, by James M. O'Toole.


On Dumpster Diving, Lars Eighner Mar 1992

On Dumpster Diving, Lars Eighner

New England Journal of Public Policy

Lars Eighner became homeless in 1988 after leaving a job he had held for ten years as an attendant at a state hospital in Austin, Texas. He lives in a small apartment in Austin and continues to scavenge. This article was originally published in the Fall 1990 issue of The Threepenny Review. Reprinted with permission.


Homelessness, A. E. S. Mar 1992

Homelessness, A. E. S.

New England Journal of Public Policy

Personal story from A.E.S., a member of the Portland (Maine) Coalition for the Psychiatrically Disabled.


Streets Are For Nobody: Pat Gomes, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Pat Gomes, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interview by Melissa Shook, July 2, 1990, Cambridge. Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak," Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


Diary, Susan M. Fowler Mar 1992

Diary, Susan M. Fowler

New England Journal of Public Policy

A personal story by Susan Fowler, a former resident of Fifty Washington Square, Newport, Rhode Island. She now lives in her own apartment in Newport with her two-year-old daughter and is "doing great." Her work has appeared in In the Heart of the City, a literary magazine produced by the residents of Fifty Washington Square.


My Life, Thomas Newman Mar 1992

My Life, Thomas Newman

New England Journal of Public Policy

A personal story by Thomas Newman, a resident of Fifty Washington Square, Newport, Rhode Island. His work has appeared in In the Heart of the City, a literary magazine produced by the residents of Fifty Washington Square. He hopes to be a photographer.


Down And Out In Boston, Jack Thomas Mar 1992

Down And Out In Boston, Jack Thomas

New England Journal of Public Policy

Jack Thomas is a reporter for the Boston Globe, in which this article first appeared, on February 12, 1992. Reprinted with permission.


Streets Are For Nobody: Judy Silva, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Judy Silva, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interview by Melissa Shook, April 24, 1990, Chelsea. Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak," Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


My Name Is Edward, I Am An Alcoholic, Edward Baros Mar 1992

My Name Is Edward, I Am An Alcoholic, Edward Baros

New England Journal of Public Policy

A personal story by Edward Baros, a resident of Fifty Washington Square, Newport, Rhode Island. His work has appeared in In the Heart of the City, a literary magazine produced by the residents of Fifty Washington Square.


Triangulation In Monument Square, S. B. Mar 1992

Triangulation In Monument Square, S. B.

New England Journal of Public Policy

A personal story by S.B., a member of the Portland (Maine) Coalition for the Psychiatrically Disabled.


The Story Of My Life, Betty Reynolds Mar 1992

The Story Of My Life, Betty Reynolds

New England Journal of Public Policy

Betty Reynolds is a resident of Fifty Washington Square, Newport, Rhode Island. Her work has appeared in In the Heart of the City, a literary magazine produced by the residents of Fifty Washington Square. She loves "to write short stories and poems."


Streets Are For Nobody: Margaret Mullins, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Margaret Mullins, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interview by Melissa Shook, February 1989, Long Island Shelter. Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak, "Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


Streets Are For Nobody: Marybeth, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Marybeth, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interview by Melissa Shook, November 1988, Long Island Shelter. (No contact with Marybeth after she left the shelter.) Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak, "Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


Streets Are For Nobody: Mary, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Mary, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interview by Melissa Shook, June 24, 1990, Castle Island, South Boston. Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak," Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


Streets Are For Nobody: Awilda Cruz, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Awilda Cruz, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interviewed by Melissa Shook, July 29, 1989, Shepherd House, Dorchester. Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak, "Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


Streets Are For Nobody: Caroline, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Caroline, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interview by Melissa Shook, July 7, 1988, Boston. Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak," Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


Streets Are For Nobody: Marie, Melissa Shook Mar 1992

Streets Are For Nobody: Marie, Melissa Shook

New England Journal of Public Policy

From an interview by Melissa Shook, September 11, 1988, South End. Reprinted, with permission, from "Streets Are for Nobody: Homeless Women Speak," Boston Center for the Arts, 1991.


The Father/Mother, Leonard Bushkoff Mar 1991

The Father/Mother, Leonard Bushkoff

New England Journal of Public Policy

Leonard Bushkoff's "The Father/Mother" vignette, chronicling his move from "a smug Detroit suburb to mid-Cambridge shabbiness" as "the troubled sixties turned into the confusing seventies." The counterculture for most of us now exists only in the form of dim memories of a time when the promise of America lost its spiritual luster. That generation is now shaping our future, still groping for a beacon that will renew the promise, that would truly herald the progress of "a kinder, gentler nation."


The Happy Accident, Robert Manning Jun 1989

The Happy Accident, Robert Manning

New England Journal of Public Policy

In "The Happy Accident," Robert Manning's delightful memoir of his early newspaper days in Binghamton, New York, we are brought back to an earlier and seemingly more innocent time when New England — and America — stood on the threshold of change. The moral of going home, it seems, is that as much changes, much never changes — something we should perhaps remember in these last feverish days of the nineteen eighties.


Home To New England, Alfred Alcorn Jan 1989

Home To New England, Alfred Alcorn

New England Journal of Public Policy

In "Home to New England," Alfred Alcorn adds a very personal dimension to our ongoing search for the characteristics that define the New England ethic. Visiting his father-in-law's home, built in Chelmsford in 1690, became an experience "a little like touching history itself, the vernacular history of a simple, hardworking and yet cannily sophisticated people."


Refugee In New England, James C. Thomson Jr. Jun 1988

Refugee In New England, James C. Thomson Jr.

New England Journal of Public Policy

James C. Thomson, Jr., in his vivid memoir "Refugee in New England," shows how our sense of place is central to the way in which we see ourselves and to our sense of belonging.