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Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

Selected Bibliography Of Work About And Of Edward Said's Texts, Clare Callaghan Dec 2003

Selected Bibliography Of Work About And Of Edward Said's Texts, Clare Callaghan

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided.


Postcolonial African Consciousness And The Poetry Of Agostinho Neto, Irene Marques Dec 2003

Postcolonial African Consciousness And The Poetry Of Agostinho Neto, Irene Marques

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "Postcolonial African Consciousness and the Poetry of Agostinho Neto," Irene Marques introduces the magic words of a great poet with the question: can poetry carry enough sorrow, enough strength, enough fire, enough love, enough wisdom, enough care, and enough horror to penetrate the hearts and the souls of the oppressed and the oppressors so that both will desperately want to escape their sinister labels? For Marques, this question represents an old quandary and one that many of us wish could be answered with a simple yes. Marques analyses Neto's poetry in the context of littérature engagé ...


Dorian Gray, Tom Ripley, And The Queer Closet, Jonathan Alexander, Deborah Meem Dec 2003

Dorian Gray, Tom Ripley, And The Queer Closet, Jonathan Alexander, Deborah Meem

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their paper, "Dorian Gray, Tom Ripley, and the Queer Closet," Jonathan Alexander and Deborah Meem present and portray an imaginary conversation among an impossible but intriguing group of writers, critics, and fictional characters. These individuals speak in their own (published) voices, which are moderated by the author-facilitators and shaped into an extended rumination on art, the Doppelgänger, queerness, and literary influence. Through their dialogue, the actors reveal a tradition of the queer novel, running in this case from Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray to Patricia Highsmith's five Tom Ripley books, whereby the closet functions simultaneously ...


On Edward Said, Scholar And Public Intellectual, F. Elizabeth Dahab Dec 2003

On Edward Said, Scholar And Public Intellectual, F. Elizabeth Dahab

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "On Edward Said, Scholar and Public Intellectual," F. Elizabeth Dahab pays tribute to Edward Said, 1935-2003. Dahab discusses selected aspects of Said's trajectories as a scholar and Palestinian-American activist including aspects of Said's numerous activities and work as a musician, an ardent political polemicist, a music critic, a Columbia University professor of comparative literature, a humanist, President of the Modern Language Association of America, and an exiled Palestinian as evident in the vast corpus of this eminent scholar's publications over the course of almost four decades (twenty-four books and hundreds of articles and interviews ...


Cultures Of Populism And The Political Right In Central Europe, Patricia Chiantera-Stutte, Andrea Petö Dec 2003

Cultures Of Populism And The Political Right In Central Europe, Patricia Chiantera-Stutte, Andrea Petö

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their paper, "Cultures of Populism and the Political Right in Central Europe," Patricia Chiantera-Stutte and Andrea Petö analyze the common points and differences in which imagined and mythologized histories are serving as a mobilizing force for extreme-right movements in three Central European countries, in Austria, Hungary, and Italy. The authors discuss how populist and right-wing political parties in these countries construct their conceptions of an alternative identity for the European Union. Further, the authors analyze the politico-territorial myths constructed by the three populist right-wing parties, the Freedom Party in Austria, the Northern League in Italy, and the Party of ...


From Plato To Derrida And Theories Of Play, Simona Livescu Dec 2003

From Plato To Derrida And Theories Of Play, Simona Livescu

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "From Plato to Derrida and Theories of Play," Simona Livescu proposes a reevaluation of the concept of play. By examining various critical interpretations of this term from Greek antiquity to modern structuralists and poststructuralist theories, Livescu analyzes the common denominator in philosophical, cultural, and religious facets of the play. In her discussion, Livescu emphasizes the ultimate importance of the ludic presence in every fundamental human action. Among the conclusions of the paper, Livescu suggests that play exists as an essence of consciousness and that it is, actually, a way of being, not only a way of knowing ...


Comparative Literature Versus Comparative Cultural Studies, Tomo Virk Dec 2003

Comparative Literature Versus Comparative Cultural Studies, Tomo Virk

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his paper, "Comparative Literature versus Comparative Cultural Studies," Tomo Virk discusses debates of the role, essence, and the future of comparative literature as it has developed since the 1995 publication of the Bernheimer Report. Virk explores the situation of the discipline in its North American context: "contextualists" argue for the abandoning of comparative literature understood as the study of literature with theoretical investigations of literariness while the "non-contextualists" underscore the study of the linguistic structure(s) of the text. Virk supports comparative literature understood as the traditional concentration of the discipline with focus on the specificities of literary questions ...


Symbolism, Popular Drama, And Politics And Art In Belgium, 1886-1910, Joan Gross Sep 2003

Symbolism, Popular Drama, And Politics And Art In Belgium, 1886-1910, Joan Gross

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "Symbolism, Popular Drama, and Politics and Arts in Belgium, 1886-1910," Joan Gross examines what effects the reign of terror in the Congo and the silence that masked it might have had on popular performance traditions and literary practices in Belgium. Gross examines a popular puppet play by Léopold Leloup and an essay by Maurice Maeterlinck, both of which are called The Massacre of the Innocents. The third text she explores is a parliamentary speech given by Émile Vandervelde in 1903 in which he protested brutal practices in the Congo. Gross explores the interconnections between these three disparate ...


Qu(E)Erying Comic Book Culture And Representations Of Sexuality In Wonder Woman, Brian Mitchell Peters Sep 2003

Qu(E)Erying Comic Book Culture And Representations Of Sexuality In Wonder Woman, Brian Mitchell Peters

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his paper, "Qu(e)erying Comic Book Culture and Representations of Sexuality in Wonder Woman," Brian Mitchell Peters proposes that youth culture is responsible for an arbitrary yet highly structured appropriation of what we can call high-contemporary culture. Hence, notions of pop-culture take from the past and use the present to create a highly fluid now, capable of transcending its present moment in a stereotypical fifteen minutes of fame. Part of twentieth-century pop-culture phenomena is the evolution of the comic book. The comic, in its habitual split of binaries, creates a space where young people have tapped consistently into ...


An Introduction To Comparative Cultural Studies And Popular Culture, Benton Jay Komins Sep 2003

An Introduction To Comparative Cultural Studies And Popular Culture, Benton Jay Komins

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided.


New Orleans And Its Influence On The Work Of Lillian Hellman, Charlotte Headrick Sep 2003

New Orleans And Its Influence On The Work Of Lillian Hellman, Charlotte Headrick

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article, "New Orleans and Its Influence on the Work of Lillian Hellman," Charlotte Headrick explores playwright Lillian Hellman's life and work. Headrick proposes that Hellman was indelibly shaped by her years in the city of New Orleans. In her early childhood, Hellman would spend half a year in New York and half a year in New Orleans, home to her parents. Despite this seemingly schizophrenic upbringing, she considered herself a Southerner to the end of her days and, in fact, defined herself less by her Jewishness than by her "Southernness." Hellman's plays and memoirs are peppered ...


Holy Fools, Secular Saints, And Illiterate Saviors In American Literature And Popular Culture, Dana Heller Sep 2003

Holy Fools, Secular Saints, And Illiterate Saviors In American Literature And Popular Culture, Dana Heller

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article, "Holy Fools, Secular Saints, and Illiterate Saviors in American Literature and Popular Culture," Dana Heller identifies and analyzes characteristics of the holy fool figure in American literature and culture. Heller defines the holy fool, or divine idiot, as a figure central to U.S. myths of nation. One encounters such figures in American literature as well as in American folklore, popular culture, and mass media. In American culture, the Divine Idiot is a hybrid form which grows out of the crossings of numerous literary and historical currents, both secular and non-secular. This unwieldy hybridity -- the fact that ...


Heidegger, The Erotics Of Ontology, And The Mass-Market Romance, Deborah Lutz Sep 2003

Heidegger, The Erotics Of Ontology, And The Mass-Market Romance, Deborah Lutz

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "Heidegger, the Erotics of Ontology, and the Mass-Market Romance," Deborah Lutz explores a particular formula of mass-market romance -- the dangerous lover or "sweet savage" one -- as an allegory for Heidegger's theories of nearness and being-toward-an-end in Being and Time. The postponements, secrets, and failed presence of the final immanence of love in these narratives allegorize the flight and entanglement of Dasein in the everyday. The romance's narrative movement as always in relationship with its end -- the full presence of love -- and its structure of being always ahead of itself, mirrors the narrativity of Dasein's ...


Selected Bibliography Of Work In Cultural Studies And Us-American Popular Culture, Marta Guirao, Benton Jay Komins Sep 2003

Selected Bibliography Of Work In Cultural Studies And Us-American Popular Culture, Marta Guirao, Benton Jay Komins

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided.


Teaching Merchant-Class Virtues With Chushingura And The London Merchant, David S. Escoffery Jun 2003

Teaching Merchant-Class Virtues With Chushingura And The London Merchant, David S. Escoffery

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his paper, "Teaching Merchant-Class Virtues with Chushingura and The London Merchant," David S. Escoffery examines the different styles of teaching merchant-class virtues in eighteenth-century Japan and England through an analysis of the classical Japanese play Chushingura and the didactic British play The London Merchant. He holds that in both Europe and Japan, the eighteenth century saw the rise of a whole new class, the middle class, to either economic or social power or both. That century was also a didactic age for the theatre. For the first time, the audience could see characters from the new merchant class on ...


Corpi, Murakami, And Contemporary Hardboiled Fiction, Cathy Steblyk Jun 2003

Corpi, Murakami, And Contemporary Hardboiled Fiction, Cathy Steblyk

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "Corpi, Murakami, and Contemporary Hardboiled Fiction," Cathy Steblyk discusses comparatively texts by contemporary detective fiction writers, one an ethnic-minority US-American and the other Japanese. Steblyk proposes that in detective fiction since the late 1980s, morally or ethically contestable sites of history have been given a postmortem by contemporary authors who are interested in restoring the lost parts of cultural histories. Detective fictions by feminist US-Chicana author Lucha Corpi and Japanese writer Murakami Haruki show how recent fiction from around the globe uses the hardboiled genre for the purposes of exploring past injustices and offering revisionist histories. The ...


Adventure Tales, Colonialism, And Alexander Montgomery's Australian Perspective, Christine Doran Jun 2003

Adventure Tales, Colonialism, And Alexander Montgomery's Australian Perspective, Christine Doran

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "Adventure Tales, Colonialism, and Alexander Montgomery's Australian Perspective," Christine Doran discusses an early nineteenth-century example of Australian literature dealing with Southeast Asia. The text analysed is about Borneo, in a collection of short stories by Alexander Montgomery entitled Five-Skull Island and Other Tales of the Malay Archipelago, published in Melbourne in 1897. In the paper, Doran's focus is on Montgomery's adventure tales and she situates the texts within their literary and cultural contexts. Montgomery's writing is then analyzed in the light of postcolonial scholarship. Doran argues that in several important ways this author ...


Negotiating Boundaries In Divakaruni's The Mistress Of Spices And Naylor's Mama Day, Susana Vega-González Jun 2003

Negotiating Boundaries In Divakaruni's The Mistress Of Spices And Naylor's Mama Day, Susana Vega-González

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article, "Negotiating Boundaries in Divakaruni's The Mistress of Spices and Naylor's Mama Day," Susana Vega-González analyzes the intertextual connections between these two novels. In Vega-González's view, the texts discussed transcend their authors' different ethnic and ethno-cultural backgrounds and appeal to universalisms found in literature. Vega-González proposes that writing from a bi-cultural perspective, Indian American Chitra B. Divakaruni and African American Gloria Naylor share both content and stylistic features in their acclaimed novels. Their conscious effort to dissolve established boundaries as well as their ethno-cultural legacies leads these authors to a magic realistic approach, an apt ...


Science, Sexuality, And The Novels Of Huxley And Houellebecq, Angela C. Holzer Jun 2003

Science, Sexuality, And The Novels Of Huxley And Houellebecq, Angela C. Holzer

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her article "Science, Sexuality, and the Novels of Huxley and Houellebecq," Angela C. Holzer begins with an introduction to recent discourse about contemporary culture by Francis Fukuyama, notably in his book Our Posthuman Future (2001). Next, Holzer introduces twentieth-century literary representations of genetic engineering. Focusing on Huxley's Brave New World (1932) and on Houellebecq's Les Particules élémentaires (1998), Holzer discusses differences in "utopian" literature when linked to metaphysical aspects of reproduction and that are owing to changes in the life sciences and medicine. Further, Holzer explores the implications for poetics resulting from scientific developments and relates Houellebecq ...


Reading War With Nietzsche And Reading Nietzsche With Kant, Rimbaud, And Bataille, Adrian Gargett Mar 2003

Reading War With Nietzsche And Reading Nietzsche With Kant, Rimbaud, And Bataille, Adrian Gargett

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his paper, "Reading War with Nietzsche and Reading Nietzsche with Kant, Rimbaud, and Bataille," Adrian Gargett discusses the aspects of poetry, communication, and notion that the apparition of Nietzsche manifested in Bataille is not a locus of secular reason but of necromantic religion: a writer who escapes philosophical conceptuality in the direction of unidentified zones, and dispenses with the "thing in itself" because it is an article of intelligible representation with no importance as a vector of becoming/of travel. Necromancy resists the transcendence of death opening territories of "voyages of discovery never reported." Against the strain of inert ...


Cultures Matter: A Review Article Of Books By Harrison And Huntington, Segesváry, And Breckenridge, Pollock, Bhabha, And Chakrabarty, William H. Thornton Mar 2003

Cultures Matter: A Review Article Of Books By Harrison And Huntington, Segesváry, And Breckenridge, Pollock, Bhabha, And Chakrabarty, William H. Thornton

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided.


Nobel In Literature 2000 Gao Xingjian's Aesthetics Of Fleeing, Mabel Lee Mar 2003

Nobel In Literature 2000 Gao Xingjian's Aesthetics Of Fleeing, Mabel Lee

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "Nobel in Literature 2000 Gao Xingjian's Aesthetics of Fleeing," Mabel Lee explores the aesthetic dimensions of Gao Xingjian's play Taowang (Fleeing 1990), and its significance in establishing the recurring motif of "fleeing" in Gao's later writings on literature. Lee argues that the intensely emotional times during which Gao wrote Fleeing were comparable to those seventy years earlier confronting May Fourth writers. Urging his compatriots not to be "bystanders," Lu Xun, the most influential of May Fourth writers, had chosen to allow his creative self to suicide, as shown in the prose-poems of Yecao (Wild ...


Translation Studies And Agamben's Theory Of The Potential, Paolo Bartoloni Mar 2003

Translation Studies And Agamben's Theory Of The Potential, Paolo Bartoloni

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article, "Translation Studies and Agamben's Theory of the Potential," Paolo Bartoloni discusses the interstitial space of translation by drawing on literary and philosophical preoccupations, especially Giorgio Agamben's notion of "potentiality." The first part of the article is devolved to defining and discussing "potentiality" and the significance that it has for a general re-thinking of translation theory. Bartoloni moves on to ask what would happen if the focus of translation shifts from the final product, or from the relation between the original and the translation, to the process of translating, that is the middle ground, the in-betweenness ...


The Horlas: Maupassant's Mirror Of Self-Reflection, Edward J. Lusk, Marion Roeske Mar 2003

The Horlas: Maupassant's Mirror Of Self-Reflection, Edward J. Lusk, Marion Roeske

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In their co-authored paper, "The Horlas: Maupassant's Mirror of Self-Reflection," Edward J. Lusk and Marion Roeske present a comparative analysis of three works of Maupassant: Lettre d'un fou, Le Horla of 1886, and Le Horla of 1887. The authors argue that these works form a trilogy by which Maupassant expresses his struggle to resolve the issues that seem to haunt him during the time that he pens the Horla trilogy. This introspective search is crafted around the failure of a mirror to provide a reflected image and the assessment of the likelihood that the strange events presented in ...


Nobel In Literature 2002 Imre Kertész's Aesthetics Of The Holocaust, Sára Molnár Mar 2003

Nobel In Literature 2002 Imre Kertész's Aesthetics Of The Holocaust, Sára Molnár

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In her paper, "Nobel in Literature 2002 Imre Kertész's Aesthetics of the Holocaust," Sára Molnár discusses aspects of Nobel Laureate Imre Kertész's reception in Hungary. In her analysis, Molnár discusses aesthetic features of the author's use of language. Molnár's study illuminates the problem of authorship and questions relating to intersections of fiction and autobiography in Kertész's oeuvre. Molnár's argument is that although the author's personal history is indeed important in his texts, this "author" should not be identified with Kertész himself and that although Kertész's themes and subjects appear to be autobiographical ...


And The 2002 Nobel Prize For Literature Goes To Imre Kertész, Jew And Hungarian, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2003

And The 2002 Nobel Prize For Literature Goes To Imre Kertész, Jew And Hungarian, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

In his article "And the 2002 Nobel Prize for Literature Goes to Imre Kertész, Jew and Hungarian" Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek presents an introduction to the recepient of the 2002 Nobel Prize in Literature, Imre Kertész, and his work. Tötösy de Zepetnek places Kertész's work in the context of Central European culture and within that in the genre of Central European Jewish memoir literature (but not autobiography). In Tötösy de Zepetnek's opinion the cultural and social relevance of Jewish memoir writing today is of particular importance precisely for the same reasons Kertész articulates when he says, "I am ...


Comparing Anew: A Review Article Of New Work By Kushner, Zhang, Halio And Siegel, And San Román, Nicoletta Pireddu Mar 2003

Comparing Anew: A Review Article Of New Work By Kushner, Zhang, Halio And Siegel, And San Román, Nicoletta Pireddu

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided.