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Behind The Veil? Catharine Sedgwick And Anonymous Publication, Melissa J. Homestead Jan 2003

Behind The Veil? Catharine Sedgwick And Anonymous Publication, Melissa J. Homestead

Faculty Publications -- Department of English

The idea that women in past centuries withheld their names because they experienced their own authorship as shameful or scandalous has achieved the character of received wisdom. Ask a typical lower-level undergraduate what she knows about women's authorship in the United States during the years of Sedgwick's greatest productivity (the 1820s through the 1840s), and she will tell you: "It wasn't considered respectable for women to write back then, so they didn't give their names, or they took male pseudonyms." I argue instead that Sedgwick's anonymity was a market strategy for constructing an authorial persona ...


Chronological Bibliography Of The Works Of Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Lucinda L. Damon-Bach, Allison J. Roepsch, Melissa J. Homestead Jan 2003

Chronological Bibliography Of The Works Of Catharine Maria Sedgwick, Lucinda L. Damon-Bach, Allison J. Roepsch, Melissa J. Homestead

Faculty Publications -- Department of English

This two-part bibliography has been built by consulting the Bibliography of American Literature (BAL) and the bibliographies compiled by Sister Mary Michael Welsh ("Catharine Maria Sedgwick: Her Position in the Literature and Thought of Her Time up to 1860," Ph.D. diss., Catholic Universiry of America, 1937) and Richard Banus Gidez ("A Study of the Works of Catharine Maria Sedgwick," Ph.D. diss., Ohio State Universiry, 1958); library cataloging records; and the personal records of Lucinda Damon-Bach and Melissa J. Homestead. In most cases, entries have been confirmed through books, periodicals, photocopies, or microfilm received through interlibrary loan. We were ...


Review Of George Eliot, Music And Victorian Culture, Delia Da Sousa Correa Jan 2003

Review Of George Eliot, Music And Victorian Culture, Delia Da Sousa Correa

The George Eliot Review

Delia da Sousa Correa takes as starting point 'the yearning for spiritual expansion and sympathetic experience' so evident in George Eliot; and music, an 'undersong' to the desires of transcendence and affinity, is the prime concern in da Sousa Correa's exploration of its transformations in Eliot's fiction. To do this, da Sousa Correa explores a range of intellectual and cultural contexts for Eliot's work, though not all those her title's inclusive 'Victorian culture' might suggest. Da Sousa Correa acknowledges Beryl Gray's George Eliot and Music (1989) and rightly claims her approach differs fundamentally, the two ...


Review Of George Eliot A Bibliographical History, William Baker, John C. Ross Jan 2003

Review Of George Eliot A Bibliographical History, William Baker, John C. Ross

The George Eliot Review

This enormously impressive history is the fruit of something like thirty-five years of work by William Baker and John Ross. They have brought together a huge and comprehensive body of bibliographical information, broken down into five main sections and two appenctixes. There are extensive entries and notes on the major works; minor literary works (novellas and poetry); essays and reviews; miscellaneous writing (unpublished works in publishable genres, compilations of short extracts, partly authored writings, unpublished autobiographical writings); collections and collected works (more poetry, essays, novels and complete works); and 'Eliotiana' (sequels, settings for songs from The Spanish Gypsy, collections of ...


Review Of Lectures D'Une Amvre: George Eliot, 'The Mill On The Floss', Maria Tang Jan 2003

Review Of Lectures D'Une Amvre: George Eliot, 'The Mill On The Floss', Maria Tang

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot's novels have never been received in France with great enthusiasm. Translatiom have been relatively sparse, and it is still difficult to find more than one or two titles in Paris. even in the best academic bookshops, whereas Jane Austen's novels are widely read. Only a detailed reception history could reveal the reasons for this response, although it no doubt has something to do with the high Victorian tone and sentiments of George Eliot's writing, which would have fallen on deaf ears in late nineteenth-century France and a fortiori in the successive phases of twentieth-century modernism ...


Review Of Lives Of Victorian Literary Figures I, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Ralph Pite, Gail Marshall, Corinna Russell, Matthew Bevis Jan 2003

Review Of Lives Of Victorian Literary Figures I, George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Ralph Pite, Gail Marshall, Corinna Russell, Matthew Bevis

The George Eliot Review

Like Pickering and Chatto's Lives of the Great Romantics, these volumes, each one devoted to a major Victorian writer, offer a collection of facsimile reproductions of 19th or early 20th century essays, reviews and extracts from memoirs and biographies with the emphasis, according to Ralph Pite's 'General Introduction', on material hard to find outside copyright libraries. Each volume contains a thoughtful and illuminating introduction; pithy but highly informative headnotes to each item, outlining the personal relationship (if any) and general attitude of its author towards Eliot, Dickens or Tennyson and in the process attuning our ears to the ...


Review Of Middlemarch, Margret Stevens, Annelies Roeleveld Jan 2003

Review Of Middlemarch, Margret Stevens, Annelies Roeleveld

The George Eliot Review

The recent appearance of a Dutch translation of Middlemarch, in a prestigious series of classics by a leading publishing house, may well be considered as constituting 'cultural justice', and it is justice long overdue. Ever since the mid-nineteenth century, there has been a flourishing market for English literature in the Netherlands, in the original as well as in translation. Of recent years, publishing practice has been carefully to coordinate publication of translations with that of English editions, for once an English novel is available, there is hardly a market for translations. That makes it even more remarkable that there is ...


Review Of The Lifted Veil, Tim Heath Jan 2003

Review Of The Lifted Veil, Tim Heath

The George Eliot Review

It was perhaps Herbert Spencer in his Autobiography (1904) who first disseminated the myth that, though George Eliot will remain for posterity one of our finest novelists, her weakness was that she could not construct effective, dramatic plots. By implication, her stories would thus not be effective on the stage, without the commentary of her wise, omniscient narrator. Perhaps in consequence there have been fewer dramatic adaptations of George Eliot's work than those of other nineteenth-century novelists, including Jane Austen and Dickens - this despite, amongst others, an extremely distinguished silent film based on Romola, starring Lillian Gish, in 1924 ...


'The Mill On The Floss' And 'Silas Marner': New Casebooks, Nahem Yousaf, Andrew Maunder Jan 2003

'The Mill On The Floss' And 'Silas Marner': New Casebooks, Nahem Yousaf, Andrew Maunder

The George Eliot Review

This collection of essays on two of George Eliot's most popular novels adds to the growing number of Casebooks produced by Palgrave. These are useful volumes, particularly for students, providing as they do a selection of recent critical perspectives. That said, I would have thought that The Mill on the Floss might have merited a volume all to itself; however the choice of essays contained herein provides some interesting links both within and across the two novels discussed.

In their Introduction, the editors comment that 'the essays reprinted in this New Casebook serve as a reminder of the dimensions ...


Toast To George Eliot Birthday Luncheon, 24 November 2002 The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Andrew Davies Jan 2003

Toast To George Eliot Birthday Luncheon, 24 November 2002 The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Andrew Davies

The George Eliot Review

In November 2002, 'my' adaptation of Daniel Deronda finally reached the screen, on BBCl. The production had been anticipated for years, and many people must have wondered what made it take so long.

Middlemarch, in 1994, had been a great labour of love for all involved in the production, and was received so well that it's not an exaggeration to say that it revived the reputation of the Classic Serial, and the then sagging reputation of the BBC itself. I was keen to adapt more George Eliot, and the BBC were favourably inclined.

I had, shamefully, never read Daniel ...


Notes On Contributors 2003 Jan 2003

Notes On Contributors 2003

The George Eliot Review

Kathleen Adams has been Secretary of the Fellowship since 1968. She initiated the Review in 1970, was editor until 1981 and co-editor 1982-91. She published Those of Us Who Loved Her in 1980 and A Community of Interest: The Story of the George Eliot Fellowship 1930-2000 in 2000.

Terence Cave is Emeritus Professor of French, Oxford University, and Emeritus Research Fellow, St John's College. He has edited the Penguin edition of Daniel Deronda (1995) and the Oxford World's Classics edition of Silas Marner (1996). He is the author of Recognitions: A Study in Poetics (1988) and numerous books ...


Review Of Faithful Realism: Elizabeth Gaskell And Leo Tolstoy A Comparative Study, Josie Billington Jan 2003

Review Of Faithful Realism: Elizabeth Gaskell And Leo Tolstoy A Comparative Study, Josie Billington

The George Eliot Review

Who is the English novelist worthy of comparison with Tolstoy? The name of George Eliot immediately suggests itself, though even Middlemarch does not have the range of War and Peace. What Henry James said of Eliot - that she is 'also a good deal of a philosopher and it is to this union of the keenest observation with the ripest reflection that her style owes its essential force' - seems to apply to Tolstoy as well. F. R. Leavis, we recall, invoked the name of the Russian novelist in his appraisal of Eliot, arguing that the best parts of Daniel Deronda and ...


Review Of George Eliot And Schiller: Intertextuality And Cross-Culural Discourse, Dutch Readings Of George Eliot, Deborah Guth, Deiderik L. Van Werven Jan 2003

Review Of George Eliot And Schiller: Intertextuality And Cross-Culural Discourse, Dutch Readings Of George Eliot, Deborah Guth, Deiderik L. Van Werven

The George Eliot Review

In their very different ways these two studies contribute significantly to our understanding of George Eliot's place in the wider context of European literary culture. Diederik van Werven examines the nineteenth-century reception of her novels in the Netherlands, thus filling in what is, for most of the English-speaking world, a blank space in the map of her contemporary reputation; while Deborah Guth reads her work through the lens provided by the well-known but relatively neglected Schiller, who was the fust German writer to arouse her enthusiasm, but who was later supplanted, both in her own life and in subsequent ...


Address At Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden, Nuneaton 30 June 2002, Jonathan G. Ouvry Jan 2003

Address At Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden, Nuneaton 30 June 2002, Jonathan G. Ouvry

The George Eliot Review

I thought that I would talk today about a previously unexplored topic - George Eliot and cats. Unfortunately, I find that the reason why the topic is previously unexplored is that George Eliot, unlike the other Eliot, had very little, or possibly nothing, to say about cats. There may have been the odd un-named farm cat lurking about in Adam Bede, but nothing on which one could construct a ten-minute talk in the open air.

Dogs, of course, are quite another story, both real and fictional. There was Pug, a present from John Blackwood, sadly lost after only eighteen months, and ...


Address Of Wreath-Laying In Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey 20 June 2002, Margaret Wolfit Jan 2003

Address Of Wreath-Laying In Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey 20 June 2002, Margaret Wolfit

The George Eliot Review

Dear George Eliot

You don't know me - but I have been a great admirer of yours for a long time now, since I was at school in fact. I must have been very young when I first had parts of your novels read to me. Later when I was at boarding school I studied Silas Mamer for a literature exam - I can't recall my reaction to other authors at the time - but I know I wrote a letter home saying I thought George Eliot must be a wonderful person because my mother kept the letter.

After leaving school ...


Annual Report 2002, Kathleen Adams Jan 2003

Annual Report 2002, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

2002 was, as always, a busy year, and the one in which we published our Pitkin Guide to George Eliot. This was something of a milestone for us as Pitkin Guides are so well known around the UK and it seemed right that George Eliot should be included in the vast number of Pitkin titles.

We held our Annual General Meeting on 15 March and re-elected, with great pleasure, our President, Jonathan Ouvry, for another three-year term. Jonathan is so supportive of everything we do. We had been again without a treasurer until Jill Bridgewater agreed to replace Sophie Pavier ...


Comic George Eliot, George Scott Christian Jan 2003

Comic George Eliot, George Scott Christian

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot's famous digression on the nature of literary realism in chapter 17 of Adam Bede has long been understood as a kind of aesthetic manifesto for the Victorian novel. Much has been written on Eliot's insistence that a faithful narrative representation of reality must take account of low and middle life, much as Dutch genre painting seeks to imitate quotidian life in all its prosaic detail. What has attracted virtually no attention in discussions of Eliot's ideas on realism, however, is the central importance of comic theory to her realist aesthetic.' Indeed, Eliot's comic theory ...


Commemorative Occasions In 2002, Kathleen Adams Jan 2003

Commemorative Occasions In 2002, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

The George Eliot Memorial Garden in Nuneaton reached its half century in May 2002. In 1930 several literary men, amongst them George Bernard Shaw, were asked if Nuneaton should erect a memorial to George Eliot. Most of them expressed astonishment that one was not already in existence. They may have been even more amazed to discover that it would be another twenty-two years before one appeared, for it was not until 1952 that the George Eliot Memorial Garden was established.

The Newdegate family at Arbury Hall was one step ahead of Nuneaton as an obelisk had already been erected by ...


George Eliot: Elegies And Eulogies, Margaret Harris Jan 2003

George Eliot: Elegies And Eulogies, Margaret Harris

The George Eliot Review

The death of George Eliot on 22 December 1880 occasioned many prose obituaries and also a number of verse tributes.' I have located eleven of these in all, along with a twelfth poem published in her lifetime: nine poets are represented, of whom four are women and five men (assuming J. S. Dawson and 'K. G.' to be male). Together, the poems provide a sidelight on her reputation. Elegy frequently mourns dead poets and establishes poetic genealogies: while George Eliot's fame depends on her fiction rather than her poetry, her eminence in letters as well as her moral and ...


The Thirty-First George Eliot Memorial Lecture; Jane Austen And George Eliot: Afterlives And Letters, Joanne Shattock Jan 2003

The Thirty-First George Eliot Memorial Lecture; Jane Austen And George Eliot: Afterlives And Letters, Joanne Shattock

The George Eliot Review

'A woman and her book are identical' - or so the American writer Edgar Allen Poe reflected when reading an early collection of poems by Elizabeth Barrett Browning.' Remembering the autobiographical nature of much of Barrett Browning's early work, his comment is not surprising. But it has a more general relevance for nineteenth-century women writers. The charge that they could only write of what they knew, and that what they knew best was themselves, was made regularly by reviewers. The easy association of the life and the work, or more accurately, a refusal to separate them, was crucial to the ...


Japanese Branch Report, Itsuyo Shimizu Jan 2003

Japanese Branch Report, Itsuyo Shimizu

The George Eliot Review

The sixth annual convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at Tezukayama University in an ancient city, Nara, on Saturday 30 November 2002. Before the opening, the members who arrived early enjoyed Romola (a silent film directed by Henry King, 1924) and opera music (arranged by Kiyoko Tsuda, a head official of the Japanese branch).

The morning session began with an opening address by Kiyoko Tsuda, a professor at Tezukayama University. In the morning, four members read their papers under the chairmanship of Professor Yoshiko Tanaka and Professor Shigeko Tomita.

The first paper, 'Women in Scenes of ...


Letter To The Secretary Of The Fellowship, David Mendel, Kent Jan 2003

Letter To The Secretary Of The Fellowship, David Mendel, Kent

The George Eliot Review

Dear Kathleen Adams

I am writing to say thank you very much for all the work which you continue to do on behalf of us punters. If I weren't 80 I would volunteer for some job myself to ease your load, but my get up and go has got up and ·is gone.

I was disappointed with Rosalind Miles 's Memorial Lecture. Having set up a pretty spurious list of straw men - and women - she spent the rest of the lecture proving what we all know anyway, which is that GE rises above all that.

In addition she said ...