Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Comparative Literature Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

Chaucer's Parliament Of Fowls: Reading As An Act Of Will, Michael Near Oct 1985

Chaucer's Parliament Of Fowls: Reading As An Act Of Will, Michael Near

Michael Near

No abstract provided.


Address By Margaret Wolfit, Margaret Wolfit Jun 1985

Address By Margaret Wolfit, Margaret Wolfit

The George Eliot Review

'The Quiet Conquest' is the title of the Huguenot exhibition celebrating Huguenot Heritage Year - 300 years since the revoking of the Edict of Nantes - currently showing at the London Museum.

The origins and earliest application of the term Huguenot, we are told, have always been and remain somewhat obscure. The word may derive from 'Eidgenoss', meaning confederal, a word used in Geneva where John Calvin and many Huguenots settled. Other explanations for the word belong to the world of myths - a 16th century Catholic apologist, for example, apparently suggested that John Calvin nightly summoned a devil named Nox to his ...


An Evening With Steve Race Apr 1985

An Evening With Steve Race

The George Eliot Review

Take a mixture of gentle humour, superb professionalism, excellent timing and a love of music of many a Music' programme has been a much loved public figure for many years, but if his audience at the Arts Centre were expecting the same pleasant, relaxed man on stage, they were probably delighted to discover that he is even more pleasant and more relaxed than they had anticipated. From the moment he arrived on stage until he left it, he had his audience in the palm of his hand. They reacted instantly to him, and the pleasure this gave to him probably ...


Book Review: "A Delicious Effervescence Of The Mind", Gabriel Woolf, Rosalind Shanks Mar 1985

Book Review: "A Delicious Effervescence Of The Mind", Gabriel Woolf, Rosalind Shanks

The George Eliot Review

"A delicious effervescence of the mind"? It is not a quality that one immediately associates with George Eliot, whose name and countenance promise more of the sturdier attributes and less of the "fizz". Yet in a brilliant recital by Gabriel Wooir and Rosalind Shanks, many sparkling bubbles of wit sprang to life. Her love of jokes was recalled from books she laughed over in childhood, and the lively amusement she gleaned from the foibles of folk emerged from the perhaps unlikely pages of "Janet's Repentance". Bartle Massey from Adam Bede was not unexpected, but less predictable was the quick ...


Treasurer's Report- 1984 Mar 1985

Treasurer's Report- 1984

The George Eliot Review

The Statement of Accounts for 1984 is quite straightforward and little comment is needed. Although 'we had fewer members, with the result that income from subscriptions was less than in the previous year, we were much encouraged to receive donations of £96.47p. We are grateful to the Life Members who, having joined the Fellowship when subscriptions were low, have now made extra payments. We hope this is an indication of approval of what we are doing and we welcome their generous help.

Profits on most of our activities were satisfactory, especially on Gabriel Woolf's Readings, without which our ...


Full Issue, Comparative Civilizations Review Jan 1985

Full Issue, Comparative Civilizations Review

Comparative Civilizations Review

No abstract provided.


Recreating Writing: A Consideration Of Translated Literature, Rabea Jan Jan 1985

Recreating Writing: A Consideration Of Translated Literature, Rabea Jan

Theses Digitization Project

No abstract provided.


Book Review: Selections From George Eliot's Letters, Leon Drucker Jan 1985

Book Review: Selections From George Eliot's Letters, Leon Drucker

The George Eliot Review

This is a most welcome and meticulous distillation of Dr. Haight's The George Eliot Letters in nine volumes, which in this age of the video cassette will be inaccessible even in many good reference libraries. My only reservation about the editing of this very readable book of some 650 letters in 560 pages is that the letters themselves are not numbered. I certainly commend the informative headnotes above each letter, though sometimes the longer the letter, the briefer the note, which proves that Dr. Haight is never one to obtrude between himself and his heroine.

The first sentence of ...


Dani El Deronda : George Eliot's "Negro Novel", John Stott Jan 1985

Dani El Deronda : George Eliot's "Negro Novel", John Stott

The George Eliot Review

Daniel Deronda, G.H. Lewes once rather ingenuously explained, was "all about English ladies and gentlemen with the scene laid in Wiltshire" (Letters 6:136)2 ... and although the novel is evidently "about" far more than that, Lewes' words are a useful reminder that Deronda gains his entree to the world of the novel as a gentleman, the ward of Sir Hugo Mallinger, and not as a political figure: a believer in a Palestinian homeland for the Jews. I t is necessary for the novel that he believe in something, of course; as R. T. Jones has commented, "In order ...


Annual Report - 1984 Jan 1985

Annual Report - 1984

The George Eliot Review

1984 was an exciting year because of the challenge of the George Eliot Statue. Since 1980 the Fellowship Council had felt we were a little in the doldrums. After the interesting years leading up to the centenary of George Eliot's death, and the thrill of finally unveiling the Westminster Abbey Memorial Stone, everything seemed very flat. With no more big anniversaries until 2019, we might be forgiven for feeling that there was nothing much to do. But then, when the centre of Nuneaton was being pedestrianised with its attractive Victorian theme, and the Borough Council suggested making a site ...


Address Given By Revd. B.A. Ritchie At The Unveiling And Dedication Of A Memorial To George Eliot, B.A. Ritchie Jan 1985

Address Given By Revd. B.A. Ritchie At The Unveiling And Dedication Of A Memorial To George Eliot, B.A. Ritchie

The George Eliot Review

There is no difference in kind between our human selves and those particular human beings who we have learnt, throughout our history. to call the artist, the thinker, the hero, the saint . The difference is not one of kind, it is rather one of intensity of experience. At the highest level in our culture the artist. the thinker. the hero. the saint are those who. according to one of the leading theologians of our age, have ventured on our behalf on a journey of intensification. It is. of course. a journey that, to a greater or lesser degree. we are ...


The 1984 George Eliot Memorial Lecture: Love, Knowledge And Narration: George Eliot On Other Minds, Richard Freadman, D. Phil Jan 1985

The 1984 George Eliot Memorial Lecture: Love, Knowledge And Narration: George Eliot On Other Minds, Richard Freadman, D. Phil

The George Eliot Review

'It was by loving them ... that he knew them; it was not by knowing them that he loved'1 - such was Henry James's legendary conclusion about Balzac and his characters. James's point was simple but important: Balzac was, in his view, able to invest his characters with a special freedom and opaqueness because he loved them as one might love another person. They didn't spring complete and transparent from a fictional blueprint. 2

James makes a similar point about Trollope, a writer in whom he elsewhere finds fault. If Trollope 'was a knowing psychologist, he was so ...


Book Review: Frederic Harrison: The Vocations Of A Positivist, Graham Handley Jan 1985

Book Review: Frederic Harrison: The Vocations Of A Positivist, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

This book, the result of more than half a lifetime's research, provides a much-needed insight into the nature of English Positivism and one of its leading disciples, Frederic Harrison. I t opens excitingly with the twenty-three-year-old Harrison meeting the ageing but wonderfully fluent Auguste Comte, and being so mesmerised that the interview changed the course of his life and gave him his major 'vocation', the spreading of the Positivist gospel. It is a fascinating story, not so much for the positivism but because of the sheer variety of the man and his interests and indestructible energy. Martha Vogeler's ...


George Eliot's Theory Of The Novel, Richard Freadman Jan 1985

George Eliot's Theory Of The Novel, Richard Freadman

The George Eliot Review

By the time George Eliot began work on Scenes of Clerical Life late in 1856, she already had in mind a pretty clear idea of what a novel ought to be. Here her work for the Westminster Review and the Leader had been of great assistance, for it had enabled her to assess many contemporary novels as well as numerous works of historical, sociological, philosophical and topical interest. The 'theory' of the novel that resulted was not as comprehensive or integrated as the historic one formalised in Henry James's Prefaces fifty years later, and it clearly underwent alteration as ...


George Eliot Country, Amy Clampitt Jan 1985

George Eliot Country, Amy Clampitt

The George Eliot Review

From this Midland scene - glum slag heaps, barge canals, gray sheep, the vivid overlap of wheat field and mustard hillside like out-of-season sunshine, the crabbed silhouette of oak trees (each joint a knot, each knot a principled demurral: tough, arthritic, stubborn as the character of her own father) - fame, the accretion of a Pyrrhic happiness, had exiled her to London, with its carriages and calling cards, its screaming headaches.

Griff House- dear old Griff, she wistfully apostrophized it - in those days still intact, its secrets kept, has now been grafted to a motel-cum-parking-lot beside the trunk road, whose raw, ungainly ...


The George Eliot Fellowship Review, Kathleen Adams, Graham Handley Jan 1985

The George Eliot Fellowship Review, Kathleen Adams, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

Cover Design By William Adams M.A.

The Editors do not necessarily agree with the views expressed by contributors, nor does the George Eliot Fellowship accept responsibility for such views.

THE REVIEW is produced photographically by TOPSHOP, a training organization for the young unemployed in Coventry.

No part of the REVIEW may be reproduced without the permission of the Editors.

Contributions are invited for the 1986 issue. They may be on any subject relating to George Eliot’s work, life, family or friends. They should be of up to 1,500 words in length, and it is preferred that footnotes ...


Book Review: The Clarendon Edition Of The Novels Of George Eliot (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1984), Richard Freadman Jan 1985

Book Review: The Clarendon Edition Of The Novels Of George Eliot (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1984), Richard Freadman

The George Eliot Review

In writing Daniel Deronda George Eliot hoped 'to rouse the imagination of men and women to a vision of human claims in those races of their fellow-men who most differ from them in customs and beliefs' . Typically, her aspiration was suffused with doubt. She wished the novel to be seen as an integrated work of art but worried about its aesthetic reception; and she feared that the' Jewish element' would elicit an unenthusiastic response. On both counts her apprehensiveness has been proven prophetic. Daniel Deronda remains one of the most controversial of the great English novels, its extraordinary fusion of ...


Message Of Greeting From The Fellowship President Mr. ]Onathan G. Ouvry, Jonathan G. Ouvry Jan 1985

Message Of Greeting From The Fellowship President Mr. ]Onathan G. Ouvry, Jonathan G. Ouvry

The George Eliot Review

The first year of my presidency of the George Eliot Fellowship has now safely passed, and how quickly it went! I have much enjoyed it, and though, for reasons of distance and available time, I have missed many of the most interesting functions with which the newsletter has tempted me from time to time, I have attended, with my wife Marjorie, the annual wreath-laying ceremony at Westminster Abbey which was a great pleasure as always, and the Birthday Luncheon in November which we very much enjoyed.

We were particularly sorry to miss performances on behalf of the Fellowship by Margaret ...


On Location With 'Silas Marner', Kathleen Adams Jan 1985

On Location With 'Silas Marner', Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

If you have ever regarded the life of an actor to be a glamorous one, it would have been something of an eye-opener to have visited the location of the BBC Television film of 'Silas Marner' on a cold March day. The day had followed one of almost continuous rain, and I have never seen such mud, nor so much of it. The setting was in the Cotswolds, chosen because this area remains one of the last almost totally unspoilt regions in England. The production team, eager to be as authentic as possible, had travelled the length and breadth of ...


John Letts, The Gifted Warwickshire Re Sculptor., John Letts Jan 1985

John Letts, The Gifted Warwickshire Re Sculptor., John Letts

The George Eliot Review

Some four years have elapsed since my first brief encounter with Mary Ann Evans - or 'Ann' as I had called her at that time. I t had been a strange, emotional experience with moments of deep passion and quiet companionship. But, it was not to last. The affair ended as it began, with a suddenness that was, in itself, an awakening. One does not easily get over such an experience except, perhaps, by the passing of time. And time had passed.

It was a surprise, therefore. when I discovered that a few of her close 'friends', knowing of our fondness ...


Ignorance And Power: George Eliot's Attack On Professional Incompetence, Linda K. Robertson Jan 1985

Ignorance And Power: George Eliot's Attack On Professional Incompetence, Linda K. Robertson

The George Eliot Review

Throughout both her essays and her fiction, George Eliot shows little patience with ignorance. in the epigraph to chapter 21 of Daniel Deronda she states, "It is a common sentence that Knowledge is power; but who hath duly considered or set forth the power of Ignorance?" (bk. 1) The failure of an individual to fulfill his role in society with a reasonable level of competence because of inadequate knowledge or an inability to apply information properly is a matter for concern. Beginning with her earliest fiction, Eliot uses characterisation and plot to demonstrate her contempt for a wide spectrum of ...


Middlemarch : Three Italian Journeys, Henry M. Alley Jan 1985

Middlemarch : Three Italian Journeys, Henry M. Alley

The George Eliot Review

In Middlemarch, Dorothea’s intense moment of disillusionment in Rome has been generally traced to Eliot’s own Italian journey of 1860, when, as Gordon S. Haight notes (324),1 the disappointment in many sights of the Eternal City paralleled her heroine’s. The comparisons are very compelling, especially those involving the joined responses of author and heroine to the interior landscape of St. Paul’s (“the lovely marble… was half-covered with hideous red drapery (Life 132: vol. 2, ch. 10);2 "the red drapery which was being hung for Christmas spreading itself everywhere (was) like a disease of the ...


Mill On The Floss: The Author's Tone Of Voice Jan 1985

Mill On The Floss: The Author's Tone Of Voice

The George Eliot Review

It is a breathtaking evening at the Fortune Theatre, in the sense that we come to share the actress's evident inhalation of the novel and exhalation of it - all in two hours for us.

It can hardly be described as breathtaking entertainment since "The Mill on the Floss" has, until its tragic end, all the characteristics of its kind least suited, you may think, to theatrical adaptation. So the achievement of Margaret Wolfit in translating George Eliot's supposedly autobiographical novel to the stage (or to the needs of a solitary performer) is the more remarkable.

For it introduces ...


Book Review: The Mills On The Floss, J.C. Trewin Jan 1985

Book Review: The Mills On The Floss, J.C. Trewin

The George Eliot Review

“George Eliot" seems to be fashionable at the moment. I gather that Silas Marner is planned for television. Now Margaret Wolfit, Sir Donald's actress daughter, has managed to get her single-handed stage version of The Mill On The Floss into two hours.

For some it is the most immediately appealing of all the books; and it is good to see its problems yield to so direct an approach.

Margaret Wolfit has the right kind of modesty. She does not approach her protean task as if she were launching a battleship, but talks her way quietly into the narrative, establishing ...


The Quality Of Humour In 'Brother Jacob', Graham Handley Jan 1985

The Quality Of Humour In 'Brother Jacob', Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

'Brother Jacob' was written in 1860. but not published until 1864. some months after Romola had completed its run in the Cornhill Magazine. At first sight it appears to be an undistinguished piece of work. with the omniscient author well in evidence. The opening is heavy-handed, a deliberate and sententious humour being levelled at the reader:

Among the many fatalities attending the bloom of young desire. that of blindly taking to the confectionery line has not. perhaps, been sufficiently considered.

Fortunately, this is prelude to a fascinating story which has a comparable psychological insight to that shown in 'The Lifted ...


Book Review: Forms Of Feeling In Victorian Fiction, Kathleen Porter, Barbara Hardy Jan 1985

Book Review: Forms Of Feeling In Victorian Fiction, Kathleen Porter, Barbara Hardy

The George Eliot Review

The art of representing feeling within a fictional character, and of eliciting response from the reader, was well understood by the great Victorian novelists. Their methods were so successful that the characters they created and the emotional experiences they described affect today's readers as powerfully as the readers of their own time.

In this study, Professor Barbara Hardy examines the forms and languages used by various authors to represent feeling, to analyse it, and to manipulate readers' responses. She begins by considering the techniques of some earlier writers from which developed the more 'realistic' Victorian forms of fiction. She ...


The 1985 George Eliot Memorial Lecture, Michael Bell Jan 1985

The 1985 George Eliot Memorial Lecture, Michael Bell

The George Eliot Review

At the heart of George Eliot's fiction is an abiding concern for truth of feel i ng. The al truism of a Dorothea, as much as the egoism of a Rosamund, can lead to a disastrous failure in self-knowledge and in understanding of the world. Eliot, of course, was concerned with the outer worlds of nature, of society and of history, yet her approach is always through the emotional perceptions of specific individuals. Several of the great mid-Victorian novelists shared this belief that large social questions were to be approached through the issue of right feeling. Most notably Dickens ...


Toast For The 1985 George Eliot Birthday Luncheon, Graham Handley Jan 1985

Toast For The 1985 George Eliot Birthday Luncheon, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

In proposing this toast I thought I would like to look briefly at George Eliot's real children, and before anyone, sensing an even bigger mid-Victorian scandal than she created by Iiving with George Henry Lewes, asks 'Did she have any?', let me define what I mean by 'real'. I do not mean G. H. Lewes's boys, though she was a devoted mother to them in the best sense of the word, writing to them, being caring and concerned at all times, nursing one in his young manhood dedicatedly until his premature death. I do not mean Elma Stuart ...


The Epic As Work Poetry: A Case Study Of The Tradition Of Ita Among The Anambra Igbo Fisherfolk, Chukwuma Azuonye Dec 1984

The Epic As Work Poetry: A Case Study Of The Tradition Of Ita Among The Anambra Igbo Fisherfolk, Chukwuma Azuonye

Chukwuma Azuonye

No abstract provided.