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Aesop's Fables And George Eliot's Brother And Sisters Sonnets, Margaret Wolfit Dec 2005

Aesop's Fables And George Eliot's Brother And Sisters Sonnets, Margaret Wolfit

The George Eliot Review

It is always exciting to discover something new and to come upon it unexpectedly. That was my happy experience a few years ago. I had decided to try my hand at devising a biographical programme on George Eliot and to attempt to portray her at the end of her life, reminiscing on past events. I wanted to absorb as much as I could about her, starting with her early days. What were the influences that shaped her life and writing? What books had she read as a child?

She tells us: 'I could not be satisfied with the things around ...


Review Of Monomania: The Flight From Everyday Life In Literature And Art, Marina Van Zuylen Jan 2005

Review Of Monomania: The Flight From Everyday Life In Literature And Art, Marina Van Zuylen

The George Eliot Review

The obvious monomaniac in Middlemarch is Casaubon, determined and devoted to writing his 'Key to All Mythologies'. This, his idee fixe, orders his world and certainly his relationship with his wife Dorothea, who seems an unwitting victim of his obsession and his coldness. But in Marina van Zuylen's Monomania, Dorothea becomes the focus of attention: in a chapter on Middlemarch, Miss Brooke's persistent 'urge to sublimate' her will to Casaubon's is read as monomania, with compelling results.

Van Zuylen's interdisciplinary study surveys incarnations of monomania beginning in nineteenth-century Europe; she constructs monomania as an obsession whose ...


Review Of Our Daughters Must Be Wives: Marriageable Young Women In The Novels Of Dickens, Eliot And Hardy, Britta Zangen Jan 2005

Review Of Our Daughters Must Be Wives: Marriageable Young Women In The Novels Of Dickens, Eliot And Hardy, Britta Zangen

The George Eliot Review

Adopting the' 1st Gent's' maxim from the epigraph to chapter ten of Eliot's Daniel Deronda: 'Our daughters must be wives and to be wives must be what men will choose:/ Men's taste is women's test [ ....] ‘, Britta Zangen sets out to test the accuracy of this epigram throughout the Victorian period. The book is ambitious in scope, placing analysis of the marriageable woman in the complete works of Dickens, Eliot, and Hardy, within a thorough socio-historical framework which details shifting attitudes to the Woman Question from the 1840s to the 1890s. These weighty sections of historical 'context ...


Review Of The Effective Protagonist In The Nineteenth-Century British Novel: Scott, Bronte, Eliot, Wilde, Terence Dawson Jan 2005

Review Of The Effective Protagonist In The Nineteenth-Century British Novel: Scott, Bronte, Eliot, Wilde, Terence Dawson

The George Eliot Review

Let me declare my critical prejudices from the outset. Terence Dawson's study is a work of psychological criticism, of post-Jungian criticism to be exact, and I am frequently left unconvinced by such critical inquiry. As Dawson admits, 'it is often held that the weakness of psychological analyses of literary works is that they require the reader to accept their premises. This both is, and is not so.' In the case of Dawson's book, I can't help but feel that it is so, and by the end of a dense, if often suggestive, study, I remained unpersuaded as ...


Romantic Love As A Spiritual Companionship? A Buddhist Re-Reading Of George Eliot, Richard Winter Jan 2005

Romantic Love As A Spiritual Companionship? A Buddhist Re-Reading Of George Eliot, Richard Winter

The George Eliot Review

Introduction

Like most of George Eliot's fiction, Daniel Deronda can be read as a story about the possibility of redemption. Gwendolen Harleth' s vanity and ambition make her vulnerable to Grandcourt' s desire for dominance, and their marriage is a disaster. Belatedly, Gwendolen comes to recognise that a marriage to Daniel Deronda instead of Grandcourt might have rescued her from her egotism and led to her moral and emotional salvation. But for Deronda finding a wife is part of exploring a wider social and spiritual significance for his existence - i.e. his Jewish cultural origin and the Zionist religious ...


The Widening Vision And Undying Hope In The Spanish Gypsy, Miyuki Amano Jan 2005

The Widening Vision And Undying Hope In The Spanish Gypsy, Miyuki Amano

The George Eliot Review

On 20 May 1839, young Mary Ann Evans wrote to her close friend, Maria Lewis, about her 'oscillating judgment' on a religious matter: 'On no subject do I veer to all points of the compass more frequently than on the nature of the visible church. I am powerfully attracted in a certain direction but when I am about to settle there, counter assertions shake me from my position'.1 This confession foreshadows a characteristic pattern of thinking of the later George Eliot. Her keen insight enables her to grasp the validity of multiple perspectives, and at the same time prevents ...


George Eliot Birthday Lucheon, 21 November 2004 The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Rosemary Ashton Jan 2005

George Eliot Birthday Lucheon, 21 November 2004 The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Rosemary Ashton

The George Eliot Review

Ladies and gentlemen, this is a special year because it is ISO years since George Eliot and G. H. Lewes began to live together openly. 22 November 1854 was her thirty-fifth birthday. Where were she and Lewes? What were they doing?

They were in Berlin, having moved on from Weimar on 3 November. They had left England on 19 July, the day Marian Evans sent her famous telegram to her Coventry friends Charles and Cara Bray and Sara Hennell:

Dear Friends - all three

I have only time to say good bye and God bless you. Poste Restante, Weimar

for the ...


Adam Bede, Geoffrey Beevers Jan 2005

Adam Bede, Geoffrey Beevers

The George Eliot Review

Adam Bede is not easily adaptable to the stage. Its structure is essentially narrative rather than dramatic, and much of its interest consists in the probing of moral issues and analysis of motive. A straightforward retelling of the plot without any sort of commentary (as often happens with television adaptations) would leave it an empty shell. Geoffrey Beevers is well aware of this and is concerned to preserve as much of George Eliot's own voice as he can. One way of doing this would have been to include a 'voice over' explaining, commenting and interpreting (as was done for ...


Address At Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden, Nuneaton 13 June 2004, Nada Lyons Jan 2005

Address At Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden, Nuneaton 13 June 2004, Nada Lyons

The George Eliot Review

I am honoured and delighted to be here today to pay tribute to my great-great-grandfather, George Henry Lewes, and to George Eliot in the year that marks the 150th anniversary of the beginning of their life together. From an early age they have been part of my life. At home I sat on a sofa that belonged to them. Books by and about them lined our shelves. And occasionally biographers would visit my mother when they were researching their books. I was always very proud of Lewes's wide achievements as a writer and literary critic, scientist and amateur actor ...


Address At Wreath-Laying In Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey 24 June 2004, Gabriel Woolf Jan 2005

Address At Wreath-Laying In Poets' Corner, Westminster Abbey 24 June 2004, Gabriel Woolf

The George Eliot Review

150 years ago, in 1854, George Eliot, still Marian Evans at that point, and George Henry Lewes made the momentous decision to live together. They did so for 24 years until Lewes died and, in the first five years together, made literary history. We know they couldn't marry, we know that neither of them was regarded as physically attractive but, to quote an apposite line from a Shakespeare sonnet: Let me not to the marriage of true minds, admit impediment. Not even in this place.

The inspirational meeting of such minds and the rich love the two bore each ...


Annual Report 2004, Kathleen Adams Jan 2005

Annual Report 2004, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

Our year never gets off to an exciting start because the first event is the Annual General Meeting but the 2004 one was rather different. The business meeting was completed swiftly as there was no change to the Council or to the officers. There was still some concern about the positions of Chairman and Secretary as there were no nominations for either post although it was known that both were eager to be replaced. The meeting was very well attended but this was obviously because we followed the business meeting with a visit from Louis Marks who produced the BBC ...


Aspects Of 'Indefiniteness' In George Eliot's Middlemarch, Omar Sabbagh Jan 2005

Aspects Of 'Indefiniteness' In George Eliot's Middlemarch, Omar Sabbagh

The George Eliot Review

In this article I will be teasing out the significance of the various uses and senses of 'indefiniteness' in Middlemarch. Whether it is in relationships between other characters, or between Dorothea and other characters, or between Dorothea and herself, or indeed between Dorothea and the novel or the reader, it will be seen that indefiniteness often stands in for unfavourable conceptions of abstraction and externality, and that all contribute to disharmony in Eliot's rendering. This disharmony is resolved by the end of the novel, and it seems to me that this particular resolution is one of the novel's ...


The George Eliot Review: Journal Of The George Eliot Fellowship 2005 No. 36, Beryl Gray, John Rignall Jan 2005

The George Eliot Review: Journal Of The George Eliot Fellowship 2005 No. 36, Beryl Gray, John Rignall

The George Eliot Review

CONTENTS

Notes on Contributors .......................................................... 5

ARTICLES Dinah Birch: 'School-Time': George Eliot and Education (The Thirty-Second George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 16 October 2004) ................................... 7

Ceri Hunter: Moving Beyond Signs: The Crisis of Language in Daniel Deronda (Prize Essay) ................................................................................ 17

Leonee Ormond: George Eliot and the Victorian Art World ........................... 25

Bonnie Shannon McMullen: Legitimate Plots, Private Lots in Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda ........................................................................................................ .39

Omar Sabbagh: Aspects of 'Indefiniteness' in Middlemarch............................................... 46

Richard Winter: Romantic Love as Spiritual Companionship? A Buddhist Re-reading of George Eliot ......................................................................... 53

Miyuki Amano: The Widening Vision and Undying Hope in The Spanish Gypsy.......................... 63

Editors' Note ................................................................ 72 ...


George Eliot And The Victorian Art World, Leonee Ormond Jan 2005

George Eliot And The Victorian Art World, Leonee Ormond

The George Eliot Review

Reading the letters and diaries of Victorian practitioners of the different arts reminds us that their social world differed markedly from that of artists today. In nineteenth-century London the number of people involved was sufficiently small for artists of all kinds to meet each other regularly.

Among the public functions at which such meetings could take place were the various events at the Royal Academy, held in the National Gallery building in Trafalgar Square until 1868 and, after that, in the Academy's grand new residence at Burlington House in Piccadilly. The Private View of the summer exhibition in May ...


The Thirty-Third George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2004 'School-Time': George Eliot And Education, Dinah Birch Jan 2005

The Thirty-Third George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 2004 'School-Time': George Eliot And Education, Dinah Birch

The George Eliot Review

In George Eliot's first piece of published fiction, the hero - if that's the right word for the hapless Reverend Amos Barton - is no advertisement for the conventional schooling of a middle-class Englishman. Though he has managed to struggle through the university degree he needs to qualify him for a clerical life, his years as a student have not made an intellectual of Amos: 'Mr. Barton had not the gift of perfect accuracy in English orthography and syntax, which was unfortunate, as he was known not to be a Hebrew scholar, and not in the least suspected of being ...


Japanese Branch Report 2004, Keiji Yata Jan 2005

Japanese Branch Report 2004, Keiji Yata

The George Eliot Review

On Saturday, 27 November 2004, the eighth annual convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at Literature Hall in Kobe College (Kobe Jogakuin).

The morning session began with an opening address by Kazuo Fujikawa (Okayama University), followed by a welcome address by Masako Hirai (Kobe College). In the morning, we had three papers. The first two papers were introduced and commented upon by Toshie Maeda (Kansai University), while Hiroshi Oshima (Hyogo University of Teacher Education) introduced and commented upon the third.

Nana Yano (Shirayuri College) read the first paper, 'Hetty and Water Imagery in Adam Bede'. Her ...


Legitimate Plots, Private Lots In Felix Holt And Daniel Deronda, Bonnie Shannon Mcmullen Jan 2005

Legitimate Plots, Private Lots In Felix Holt And Daniel Deronda, Bonnie Shannon Mcmullen

The George Eliot Review

A preoccupation with the idea of home was central to George Eliot's fiction from its beginnings until its end. In Felix Holt and Daniel Deronda, however, this theme is developed in terms that involve legal complexities that have embroiled her characters, perplexed her readers, and sent the author to seek advice and reassurance from the barrister Frederic Harrison. Esther Lyon has a 'right in remainder'! in a property, while Harold Transome has 'a reversion tantamount to possession' (p. 284), Sir Hugo Mallinger is a tenant for life, his nephew Grandcourt a tenant in tail. These intricacies of plot have ...


Moving Beyond Signs: The Crisis Of Language In Daniel Deronda, Ceri Hunter Jan 2005

Moving Beyond Signs: The Crisis Of Language In Daniel Deronda, Ceri Hunter

The George Eliot Review

It is no critical initiative to point out that George Eliot's Daniel Deronda (1876) plays with the premises of realist narrative art.! Previous readings have, however, tended to engage only tangentially with the way in which the novel scrutinises the use of language? This omission of linguistic context is curious, given that Daniel Deronda is set during a decade which placed the Victorian ruling classes' confidence in the English language under strain. The 1860s teemed with words. There were more English speakers than ever before, owing to population increase and dispersal. The English language was democratised by the 1867 ...


Review Of George Eliot & Middlemarch, Tim Dolin, George Eliot Jan 2005

Review Of George Eliot & Middlemarch, Tim Dolin, George Eliot

The George Eliot Review

Both books under review appear in series that aim to give new currency to texts and authors by the provision of critical and cultural context. The implied audience is not simply the old 'sixth form and junior undergraduate' cohorts: there is a presumption of an informed wider readership which appreciates and in some cases requires assistance from critical commentary and scholarly apparatus. Such guidance is appropriately supplied in accordance with their respective series briefs by Gregory Maertz in his edition of Middlemarch and Tim Dolin in his study of George Eliot. Maertz makes a distinct scholarly contribution to study of ...


Review Of George Eliot's Dialogue With John Milton, Anna K. Nardo Jan 2005

Review Of George Eliot's Dialogue With John Milton, Anna K. Nardo

The George Eliot Review

This, despite some blemishes and limitations indicated in passing below, is an examination of selected writings by Milton, the stories about him, and the engagement with his life and works which is reflected in the life and works of George Eliot. Nardo's primary aim is to show how Eliot's 'strenuous dialogue with Milton's life and art ... animated the epic novels she wrote for an age of unbelief' (1). Immediately we are struck by the large claims implied by 'animated' and 'epic' and the convenient but dubious definition of 'an age of unbelief'. The statement does scant service ...


History Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Jan 2005

History Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

CLCWeb Library

No abstract provided.