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Style Guide Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2000

Style Guide Of Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

CLCWeb Library

No abstract provided.


Copyright Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture ©Purdue University, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2000

Copyright Clcweb: Comparative Literature And Culture ©Purdue University, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

CLCWeb Library

No abstract provided.


Review Of George Eliot: The Last Victorian & The Journals Of George Eliot, Margaret Harris, Judith Johnston Jan 2000

Review Of George Eliot: The Last Victorian & The Journals Of George Eliot, Margaret Harris, Judith Johnston

The George Eliot Review

Kathryn Hughes has written a most readable biography, breezy, relaxed, clear narrative, just right for the reader of literary biography who isn't deeply interested in literature. The story of Mary Ann and Marian Evans, Marian Evans Lewes, George Eliot and Mrs. Cross is as fascinating as the plot of the novels, and bears re-telling, but I'm doubtful about the appeal of this new book to scholars and students, whose needs for information about George Eliot's life are served by the existing biographies, and who may be misled by the sketchy criticism. It is not as if Kathryn ...


Review Of The Letters Of George Henry Lewes, Vol. Iii, With New George Eliot Letters Jan 2000

Review Of The Letters Of George Henry Lewes, Vol. Iii, With New George Eliot Letters

The George Eliot Review

This helpful, clearly edited supplement to the original two-volume Letters of George Henry Lewes, which appeared in 1995, actually contains more letters by George Eliot than from Lewes: 79 by her and 54 by him, of which 92 (47 by him and 45 by her) are published for the first time. As William Baker says in his introduction, the letters cover each phase of their lives: her work with the Westminster Review, his with the Leader, their meeting and life together, his death and its devastating impact upon her. There are no dramatic discoveries, but the thirteen letters Lewes wrote ...


Silas Marner And Felix Holt: Antitheses And Affinities, Ruth Harris Jan 2000

Silas Marner And Felix Holt: Antitheses And Affinities, Ruth Harris

The George Eliot Review

At first sight there seems little to link Silas Mamer with Felix Halt. There are certainly contrasts, but it is harder to find similarities between a short pastoral idyll and a complex political work that looks forward to Middlemarch rather than backward to Silas Mamer. Surely there can be few links between a fairy-tale and social analysis, between a novel rich with 'Rainbow' humour and transformed 'gold' and a much darker novel laced with irony but short on both magic and jokes. Only five years separate Silas Mamer (published in April 1861) from Felix Halt (published in June 1866) but ...


"The Woman At The Window", Barbara Hardy Jan 2000

"The Woman At The Window", Barbara Hardy

The George Eliot Review

Dear Editors

May I write a postscript to Terence R. Wright's review of Perspectives on Self and Community in George Eliot: Dorothea's Window in your last number? He says I 'come down strongly on lesser critics who make the mistake of locating Dorothea's vision ... in Chapter 80 ... in the boudoir rather than the marital bedroom', but I meant to include myself amongst misinterprets, in writing 'When I first read the novel I made this mistake'.


The Margins Of George Eliot: Editing The Journals, Margaret Harris Jan 2000

The Margins Of George Eliot: Editing The Journals, Margaret Harris

The George Eliot Review

Margins are back in fashion: it's no longer marginal to be marginal. Postcolonial theory has had the effect of demonstrating the relation between the imperial centre and the periphery of empire to be one of interaction and mutual reaction, not of straightout dominance by the one of the Other. Similarly, in textual theory, marginalia and other apparatus are read in a dialogic or intertextual relation to the text and do not simply take their place in a hierarchy subordinate to it. D. C. Greetham goes further, claiming that 'these days, the margins are a peculiarly privileged position, as the ...


Towards A Critical Reputation: Henry James On Felix Holt, The Radical, Christine Richards Jan 2000

Towards A Critical Reputation: Henry James On Felix Holt, The Radical, Christine Richards

The George Eliot Review

A productive starting point for a critical evaluation of Henry James's criticism of George Eliot's fiction is his unsigned review of Felix Halt, the Radical, 1 which, as his first piece of criticism on her, is perhaps itself most usefully read against the background of the novel's extremely favourable contemporary reception,' for in his review lames addresses the issues of the novel's acclaim, arguing not only that the volume of praise it had already acquired was sufficient but also that Eliot's increasing reputation would only attract more (E&W 911). This determination to call a ...


Women And Fiction In George Eliot's "Brother Jacob", Rebecca Mackay Jan 2000

Women And Fiction In George Eliot's "Brother Jacob", Rebecca Mackay

The George Eliot Review

'Brother Jacob' raises issues of perennial concern to George Eliot as an author who was also a woman. In particular, this fabular tale about a hapless confectioner and his imbecilic brother exposes the pitfalls in women's relationship(s) to cultural authority, 'the strange bright fruits of knowledge' (Woolf 160). As a fable whose hero is distinguished by fraudulence and guile, 'Brother Jacob' reflects its author 's attitude towards plagiarists and other impostors with pretensions to authorship. Even as Marian Evans disguised herself as George Eliot, the 'silly lady novelist' of her day is disguised in the story's protagonist ...


George Eliot And Archery, Arthur G. Credland Jan 2000

George Eliot And Archery, Arthur G. Credland

The George Eliot Review

As a practicing archer with a keen interest in the history of the sport it has struck me that the importance of archery to the development of Eliot's final novel Daniel Deronda (1876) has not been properly appreciated. It provides the context for Gwendolen Harleth's fateful encounter with Grand-court, first at the Brackenshaw archery meeting where she strikes three successive golds (central hits), and subsequently at the archery ball, where he singles her out as a dance partner. Later, it is in the course of the roving archery match at Cardell Chase that she discovers the existence of ...


The Twenty-Eight George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1999, Josie Billington Jan 2000

The Twenty-Eight George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 1999, Josie Billington

The George Eliot Review

Middlemarch is widely recognized as being one of the most strenuously narrated novels in English literature. Many of the most moving, and most quoted, lines of the novel are the product of direct narrational intervention and the reader is aware of the surrounding, solicitous presence of the author-narrator throughout the novel. Throughout this paper, I am going to be looking closely at a number of short passages from the novel in order to try to establish the 'tasks' - as I call them - which George Eliot undertakes and fulfils through her narrator in Middlemarch. But I should like to point out ...


George Eliot's English Travel: "Widely Sundered Elements", Kathleen Mccormack Jan 2000

George Eliot's English Travel: "Widely Sundered Elements", Kathleen Mccormack

The George Eliot Review

Although the Midlands people, places, and stories that turn up in Scenes of Clerical Life provide the first and most easily recognized Warwickshire models in George Eliot's fiction, she also drew creatively on models she found during the many holidays and working trips she made throughout her life elsewhere within Britain. Readers' recognitions of the originals of Amos Barton and Mr. Tryan after the Scenes appeared in Blackwaod's Magazine led George Eliot to assure John Blackwood that she assembled her fiction not exclusively from her girlhood experiences but instead from 'widely sundered elements' (GEL, II, 459).' But, while ...


Japanese Branch Report 1999, Kyoko Kishimoto Jan 2000

Japanese Branch Report 1999, Kyoko Kishimoto

The George Eliot Review

The third annual convention of the George Eliot Fellowship of Japan was held at the beautiful Bunka Women's University in Musashino, Tokyo, on Saturday, 27 November 1999. On the rather cold day with eighty-seven active participants, the morning session began with a welcome speech by Yoko Yanagi, Dean of the Literature Department of Bunka Women's University. Among the three papers, the first was 'Eppie's Innocent Challenge in Si/as Mamer' by a graduate student at Edinburgh University, Yuko Nakamura. She thought that Eppie, as an eighteen-year-old woman, challenged mid-Victorian ideology with her marriage by rejecting that system ...


Obituary Of Jerome Beaty, 1924-2000 Jan 2000

Obituary Of Jerome Beaty, 1924-2000

The George Eliot Review

Jerome Beaty died on 30 January 2000, at the age of 75, after a year of illness during which he was working actively on Dickens and George Eliot. He was a fine Victorian scholar and critic, an editor, and a pioneer in the field of George Eliot textual studies. His book Middlemarch from Notebook to Novel (Urbana, 1960) analysed the genesis and composition of one of the most complex English novels, revealing that what seemed a seamless whole, more praised than studied, had its origin in two separate narrative beginnings and plans. He showed the painstaking scissors-and-paste which put together ...


Obituaries: The Rt Hon. The Viscount Daventry 1921-2000; Patron Of The George Eliot Fellowship Jan 2000

Obituaries: The Rt Hon. The Viscount Daventry 1921-2000; Patron Of The George Eliot Fellowship

The George Eliot Review

Francis Humphrey Maurice FitzRoy Newdegate, 3rd Viscount Daventry, died at his home, Temple House at Arbury, on 15 February. He had been ill for some time.

The Arbury Estate spans 4000 acres between Nuneaton and Bedworth and it was in one of the estate's farmhouses, South Farm, then known as Arbury Farm, that George Eliot was born in 1819 when her father was agent to the Arbury estate. It was because of this association with Arbury that Lord Daventry was invited to succeed his mother as Patron when she died in 1982. Until his illness he had taken a ...


Review Of George Eliot And Intoxication: Dangerous Drugs For The Condition Of England, Kathleen Mccormack Jan 2000

Review Of George Eliot And Intoxication: Dangerous Drugs For The Condition Of England, Kathleen Mccormack

The George Eliot Review

Famously insisting to her friend Barbara Bodichon that our 'highest calling' is 'to do without opium', George Eliot is not a writer whom one immediately associates with intoxication, although one of her earliest stories, 'Janet' s Repentance' in Scenes of Cle rical Life, memorably dramatizes the addictive and destructive power of alcohol in the lives of Janet and her husband, the lawyer Dempster. Kathleen McCormack's study casts its net wider than such straightforward representations of drink and drunkenness to explore the tissue of references to, and images of, intoxication, and the drugs that induce it, throughout the fiction. Intoxication ...


Review Of George Eliot's Middlemarch: A Guide For Students And Readers Of The Novel, Josie Billington Jan 2000

Review Of George Eliot's Middlemarch: A Guide For Students And Readers Of The Novel, Josie Billington

The George Eliot Review

Among certain readers of this review, those already equipped with personal computers capable of launching Cruise missiles at the twitch of a mouse, my opening paragraph will, if anything, pucker lips. But among the uninitiated it will probably furrow brows. For some, it will be more than enough to learn that the minimum system requirements for using this CD-ROM are a Pentium processor running at 100 MHz; a Graphics display card capable of 800 x 600 resolution in HiColor (16 bit); the installation of QuickTime 3 (which can be downloaded from the disc, if necessary); an 8 x speed CD-ROM ...


The Folio Society Edition Of George Eliot's Fiction Jan 2000

The Folio Society Edition Of George Eliot's Fiction

The George Eliot Review

The Millennium has provided a number of reasons for celebration, but for members of the Fellowship and admirers of George Eliot generally the year 2000 will see two signal recognitions of her status. Before it is out, the Oxford Reader s Companion to George Eliot, under the general editorship of John Rignall and with contributions from informed enthusiasts and scholars all over the world, will be issued and will provide a permanent commentary on and record of her life and works. And now the Folio Society, publishers of attractive editions, generally with illustrations by gifted engravers, have issued in January ...


A Family's Eye View Of George Eliot, Kathleen Adams Jan 2000

A Family's Eye View Of George Eliot, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

There have been very many views expressed over the years about George Eliot - her genius, her behaviour and, inevitably, her looks. But what were the views of her family back in Nuneaton? It is well known that her brother Isaac, then very much the Victorian patriarch, dismissed her from the Evans family when he knew about her liaison with G. H. Lewes. They could not subsequently be unaware of her fame and there may have been many criticisms of her expressed within the family circle.

Some family letters still exist and are in my possession, but there are not enough ...


Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden Nuneaton, 13 June 1999, Christopher Hendy Jan 2000

Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden Nuneaton, 13 June 1999, Christopher Hendy

The George Eliot Review

The Guest of Honour was Col. Christopher Hendy, OBE, the Administrator at Arbury Hall. He gave the following Address:

We are here today to celebrate the life and works of George Eliot. 'I have heard of him, of course, but I have never read any of his books' - that is the expression that I, and many of the guides at Arbury hear when we mention the connection that George Eliot had with Arbury Hall and Park. At the time that Mary Ann Evans was writing her novels it was not politic to let it be known that the author was ...


Wreath-Laying In Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, Chris Smith Jan 2000

Wreath-Laying In Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, Chris Smith

The George Eliot Review

The Guest of Honour was The Rt Hon. Chris Smith, MP, Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. The Address he gave is summarized below:

Mr. Smith is a great admirer of George Eliot and it is said that he takes with him on holiday each year one of George Eliot's novels! He began by noting that he was standing next to the memorial stone to Henry James and he reminded us of James's admiration for George Eliot. Henry James wrote on 5 March 1873 'a marvellous mind throbs in every page of Middlemarch. It raises the ...


Annual Report 1999, Kathleen Adams Jan 2000

Annual Report 1999, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

During 1999 we were unusually busy in planning the extra events to take place in 2000. Before I began this report I had spent a few weeks updating the Story of the George Eliot Fellowship which had been published for our fiftieth anniversary in 1980 and now needed a further 20 busy years added. So, as I began the report of activities for 1999 I had many other years buzzing around in my head. However, 1999 is now clear of those seventy years, and I am happy to begin with the news that 1999 was another profitable year for the ...


Conference Report George Eliot And Her Work: Anakara Turkey, March 1999, Laurence Raw Jan 2000

Conference Report George Eliot And Her Work: Anakara Turkey, March 1999, Laurence Raw

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot's works are not well-known in Turkey, except for The Mill on the Floss, which is regularly studied in university departments of English Literature as part of an introductory course to the English novel, and Silas Mamer, which is occasionally included in postgraduate courses in nineteenth-century literature. There have been only four published translations of her novels - three of The Mill on the Floss (in 1970, 1975 and 1981) and one of Silas Mamer (1977), plus an introductory guide to her work, which appeared as long ago as 1949.

The main aim of the two-day 'George Eliot and ...


The George Eliot Review: Journal Of The George Eliot Fellowship 2000 No. 31, Beryl Gray, John Rignall Jan 2000

The George Eliot Review: Journal Of The George Eliot Fellowship 2000 No. 31, Beryl Gray, John Rignall

The George Eliot Review

CONTENTS

Notes on Contributors ........................................... 5

Editors' Note ................................................ 7

ADDRESSES Colonel Christopher Hendy: Address at the wreath-laying in the George Eliot Memorial Gardens, 13 June 1999 ................................................. 9

Rt Hon. Chris Smith MP: Address at the wreath-laying in Westminster Abbey, 23 June 1999 ................................................. 11

Josie Billington: The Twenty-Eighth George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 16 October 1999 ................................................ 13

Kathryn Hughes: The Toast to the Immortal Memory: George Eliot Birthday Luncheon, 21 November 1999 ........................................... 27

ARTICLES Rebecca Mackay: Women and Fiction in George Eliot's 'Brother Jacob' (Prize Essay) ................................................................................... .31

Margaret Harris: The Margins of George Eliot: Editing the Journals ................ 37

Christine Richards: Towards a ...


Review Of Women Of The Press In Nineteenth-Century Britain, Barbara Onslow Jan 2000

Review Of Women Of The Press In Nineteenth-Century Britain, Barbara Onslow

The George Eliot Review

'Everything in the literary world is done by favour and connections'. Mary Howitt's assessment of the importance of contacts in the London of the 1840s is borne out in Barbara Onslow's wide ranging and fascinating study of nineteenth century women journalists. 'Journalism was an open profession', as she observes, 'but it was a masculine one' and women who sought access to it relied on a variety of networks. Her book is, indirectly, a superb study of female networking. Family connections helped women like Mary Howitt, Anna Maria Hall, Isabella Beeton and Alice Meynell, each of whom teamed up ...