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George Eliot Birthday Luncheon: The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Geoffrey Beevers Nov 1997

George Eliot Birthday Luncheon: The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Geoffrey Beevers

The George Eliot Review

I'm sure you all know more about George Eliot than I do, so I thought I'd talk for a few minutes about the difficulties and joys of adapting her work, and especially Adarn Bede for the stage.

I'd been asked to adapt Adarn Bede for the Orange Tree theatre in Richmond, Surrey, then a tiny room-theatre above a pub. I didn't know much about George Eliot then. I didn't know that just around the corner from the pub theatre was the beautiful house in Park Shot where she had begun to write Adarn Bede and ...


Wreath-Laying In Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, Carol A. Martin Jun 1997

Wreath-Laying In Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey, Carol A. Martin

The George Eliot Review

The nineteenth century was an age of travellers, including many famous British women travellers. Lady Hester Stanhope lived for years in the Middle East, Mary Kingsley explored the jungles of Gabon and died while performing medical work in South Africa, Isabella Bird Bishop journeyed around the globe and wrote books on Malaysia, China, Japan, the Hawaiian Islands, the Sinai Peninsula, and the valleys and peaks above 10,000 feet in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado.

George Eliot was also a woman interested in travel, though in ways different from those of the women I have just named. Several of the ...


Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden Nuneaton, Ruth Harris Jun 1997

Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden Nuneaton, Ruth Harris

The George Eliot Review

I am deeply grateful for the honour of being invited to lay a wreath in memory of George Eliot, and to lay it in a place that meant so much to her.... Nuneaton. Before the heavens opened, I pictured us all gathered outside surrounded by green grass, trees and flowers, and able to imagine the spirit of George Eliot not in her study surrounded by books but out-of-doors, enjoying the fresh air. Some imagination is needed to visualize a little girl gathering flowers in the sunshine, or running towards a Round Pool after her older brother, or leaping with delight ...


Review Of Holt The Radical, A.G. Van Den Broek, Linda Mugglestone Jan 1997

Review Of Holt The Radical, A.G. Van Den Broek, Linda Mugglestone

The George Eliot Review

With Romola, Felix Halt, the Radical has generally proved to be George Eliot's least appreciated novel. Romola used to be safely categorized as 'smelling of the lamp', while Felix Halt was awkwardly 'political'. Despite a continuing critical unease about both novels, we cannot easily employ such easy categories at the end of the twentieth century. Indeed, the whole idea of what constitutes a 'political novel' has itself radically changed. Where unreconstructed Marxist and Marxisant critics used to see politics exclusively in terms of class struggle, and George Eliot as a muddied conservative whose intellectual grasp on political affairs would ...


Review Of George Eliot And Europe, John Rignall Jan 1997

Review Of George Eliot And Europe, John Rignall

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot and Europe arrives at a timely moment, when the nature of the relationship between Britain and the Continent is at best ambiguous, and when the parameters of 'Europe' are anxiously contested. In some ways, things have not altered much since the middle and late nineteenth century: nationalism, immigration, militancy, cultural isolationism - all of these were as important to nineteenth-century ways of thinking as they are today. This collection of essays, based on a conference and part of a series which seeks to understand Europe in relation to the rest of the world, insists that in order to understand ...


Review Of Middlemarch's Three New Editions, Margaret Harris, Judith Johnston, David Carroll, Felicia Bonaparte, Rosemary Ashton Jan 1997

Review Of Middlemarch's Three New Editions, Margaret Harris, Judith Johnston, David Carroll, Felicia Bonaparte, Rosemary Ashton

The George Eliot Review

Readers of Middlemarch, it is a pleasure to report, are now spoil for choice. Joining an already saturated market are three new paperback editions, attractively produced at a very reasonable price with full critical apparatus, including textual notes, explanatory notes, introductions, chronologies, recommendations for further reading and even, in the case of the Everyman Paperbacks edition, a synopsis of the plot chapter by chapter (although the editors are quick to point out that this is 'intended to serve as an index, not as analysis', nor presumably as a substitute for reading the novel itself). The Everyman edition claims on its ...


Review Of The Mill On The Floss Jan 1997

Review Of The Mill On The Floss

The George Eliot Review

In this lamentably impoverished adaptation by Hugh Stoddart (directed by Graham Theakston), a character identified as Sophy Deane (played by Joanna David) masqueraded as one of three Dodson sisters. That George Eliot created a unit of four sisters is of minor consequence, since their individuality apparently merited so little concern that it was deemed fitting to amalgamate the lachrymose Sophy Pullet with Lucy Deane's mother, Susan - an expedient that, instead of giving us two for the price of one, merely effaced them both. In effect, every opportunity to avoid the danger of distinguishing one sister from another appeared to ...


'Tied To My Heart By A Cord Which Can Never Be Broken': George Eliot And Her Sister Chrissey, Kathleen Adams Jan 1997

'Tied To My Heart By A Cord Which Can Never Be Broken': George Eliot And Her Sister Chrissey, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

Christiana Evans, always known as Chrissey, was the first child of Robert Evans's marriage to Christiana Pearson of Astley, near Nuneaton, and she was born, as were Isaac and Mary Ann, at Arbury (now South) Farm on the Arbury estate in 1814. When the family moved to Griff House in 1820 Chrissey was old enough to go to boarding school and she went in advance of her small sister to Miss Lathom's School in nearby Attleborough. This removed her from Griff to the closer vicinity of her Aunt Evarard, later to appear as one of the Dodson sisters ...


A Forgotten Critic: Abba Goold Woolson's George Eliot And Her Heroines: A Study, Graham Handley Jan 1997

A Forgotten Critic: Abba Goold Woolson's George Eliot And Her Heroines: A Study, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

I feel that one should draw attention to the fact that in 1886 an American woman established certain emphases which succeeding critics followed, developed and extended in the twentieth century. This small book (published by Harper Brothers, New York) is a serious investigation of George Eliot's art, even employing the kind of language (Data Necessary for an Estimate of her Mind and Works') which links the scientific and the literary as a kind of consonance with George Eliot's own practice. As early as the second page there is an unequivocal assertion of the nature of her greatness - 'the ...


The Twenty-Fifth George Eliot Memorial Lecture: The Larger Meaning Of Your Voice: Varieties Of Speech In George Eliot, Raymond Chapman Jan 1997

The Twenty-Fifth George Eliot Memorial Lecture: The Larger Meaning Of Your Voice: Varieties Of Speech In George Eliot, Raymond Chapman

The George Eliot Review

When Ladislaw has watched and listened to Dorothea in the Vatican Museum, he says to the painter Naumann that language is superior to painting and 'gives a fuller image, which is all the better for being vague.[ ... ] This woman whom you have just seen, for example: how would you paint her voice, pray? But her voice is much diviner than anything you have seen of her.' The novelist does in a way paint the voice, using the visual signs of written language to convey an auditory experience.

Written dialogue may be naturalistic and idiomatic in its choice of words and ...


Having The Whip-Hand In Middlemarch, Daniel Karlin Jan 1997

Having The Whip-Hand In Middlemarch, Daniel Karlin

The George Eliot Review

In one of the first reviews of Proust's Du cote de chez Swann, appropriately published in the journal Le Temps, in 1913, the critic Paul Souday takes Proust to task for writing too much like an Englishman. 'His copious narratives have something of Ruskin and Dickens in them,' Souday remarks; and he might easily have added George Eliot, whom we know Proust to have read and admired. Souday goes on:

This superabundance of trivial events, this insistence on suggesting explanations of them, is frequently met with in English novels, where the sense of life is produced by a kind ...


'Heard But Not Seen': An Anthology Of Victorian Childhood Devised And Presented, Gabriel Woolf, Rosalind Shanks Jan 1997

'Heard But Not Seen': An Anthology Of Victorian Childhood Devised And Presented, Gabriel Woolf, Rosalind Shanks

The George Eliot Review

This year's performance of readings was subtitled A Victorian Edition of Children's Hour, and was intended for adults. The programme was constructed round the framework of the childhood of Tom and Maggie from The Mill on the Floss and included insights into the lives of other children in both fact and fiction.

Actors are usually advised that it is unwise to act with children, but to play the part of a child is another matter, and certainly not child's play. We suspended disbelief, however, and enjoyed the guilelessness of Ruthless Rhymes by Harry Graham as well as ...


Annual Report 1997, Kathleen Adams Jan 1997

Annual Report 1997, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

1997 was, as always, a busy year for the Fellowship, beginning with the Annual General Meeting on 14 March. Mrs. Kathleen Porter retired from the Fellowship Council and was thanked for many supportive years. The Chairman had just completed twenty-five years in office and was presented with a gift token to show the Fellowship's appreciation for all those years in office. Mr. David Adams was elected to take the place of Mrs. Porter and Mrs. Vivienne Wood of King Edward Sixth Form College, Nuneaton was co-opted for one year. A George Eliot version of 'Call my Bluff' concluded the ...


Review Of George Eliot, Josephine Mcdonagh Jan 1997

Review Of George Eliot, Josephine Mcdonagh

The George Eliot Review

While the old 'Writers and their Work' pamphlets were very useful in their staid, often belles-lettristic, way, since the series was relaunched in 1994 under the General Editorship of Isobel Armstrong it has made its mark in a more forthright and compelling manner. These monographs are longer than their predecessors, at around 40,000 words, and while they are uniform in format, in a livery of nationalist red, white and blue, they respond distinctively to their brief: 'Drawing upon the most recent thinking in English studies, each book considers biographical material, examines modem criticism, includes a detailed bibliography, and offers ...


The Ideolody Of Imagination: Subject And Society In The Discourse Of Romanticism, Forest Pyle Jan 1997

The Ideolody Of Imagination: Subject And Society In The Discourse Of Romanticism, Forest Pyle

The George Eliot Review

A first reaction to the title of this book might be to wonder that it has apparently not been used before: ideology, imagination, subject, society, discourse, Romanticism - a compendium of weighty terms elegantly linked. Another might be to sigh at their familiarity and abstraction: are we in for a strenuously theoretical restatement of some well-worn themes? Readers of George Eliot might have a third reaction: is this a book about Romanticism with a chapter about Eliot tacked on at the end? To answer all these questions simply, let me say that this is a valuable book and recommend it to ...


Review Of The Power Of Knowledge: George Eliot And Education, Linda K. Roberston Jan 1997

Review Of The Power Of Knowledge: George Eliot And Education, Linda K. Roberston

The George Eliot Review

This book, volume 61 of the University of Kansas Humanistic Studies series, purports to do one thing but delivers another. According to the blurb on the back cover, Robertson demonstrates that George Eliot had much to say on a number of educational issues that plagued her contemporaries. In fiction, essays, and letters, we are told, she commented on various Victorian educational debates about illiteracy, the desirability of a classical education and higher education for women. In her introduction, Robertson briefly reminds us of some nineteenth- century writers on education: Newman, Mill, Huxley, Ruskin, Arnold, Spencer and Whewell, the Master of ...


The Quest Of Anonymity: The Novels Of George Eliot, Henry Alley Jan 1997

The Quest Of Anonymity: The Novels Of George Eliot, Henry Alley

The George Eliot Review

This book derives from half a lifetime's teaching and the author's obvious affinity for George Eliot. It is earnest, sometimes engaging, often off centre. It also exists in a kind of time-warp, somewhere in the 1960s in terms of tone and stance, though there is an impressive range of criticism and background reading cited and occasionally milked. In fact, this back-up seems to be an attempt to establish critical credentials, and the constant references in which Alley says 'And I would add ... " or merely summarizes arguments reflect this. At his best he has no need of this, since ...


Review Of Perspectives On Self And Comunity In George Eliot: Dorothea's Window, Patricia Gately, Dennis Leavens, D. Cole Woodcox Jan 1997

Review Of Perspectives On Self And Comunity In George Eliot: Dorothea's Window, Patricia Gately, Dennis Leavens, D. Cole Woodcox

The George Eliot Review

This is a modest book, edited by three people who are so modest that they reveal nothing at all about their identities. It is possible to discover from a footnote on p.159 that it is a product of a conference on George Eliot although further details of that event remain undisclosed. Two of its contributors, however, are well known in George Eliot circles: Barbara Hardy and Felicia Bonaparte. Their essays are certainly worth reading while all the other contributions have something new to say about Eliot's work even if they are by today's standards under-theorized. One looks ...


Review Of Realism, Representation, And The Arts In Nineteenth-Century Literature, Alison Byerly Jan 1997

Review Of Realism, Representation, And The Arts In Nineteenth-Century Literature, Alison Byerly

The George Eliot Review

Dr. Alison Byerly's concern is with the use in their fiction by four Victorian novelists of art works, performative as well as representational, experienced by the characters as well as metaphors within the larger narrative frame, works both real and invented - the Vatican's antique Cleopatra/Ariadne in Middlemarch, for example, as well as the Agamemnon charade of Vanity Fair. Byerly sees this process as intimately bound up with 'realism' (the term is commonly offered to us in inverted commas) and with the self-consciousness of her chosen novelists: Thackeray, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, and Thomas Hardy. This process, in ...


Le "Devenir Féminin" Dans La Sociéte Moderne Occidentale À Travers Les Deux Romans De Virginie Despentes, Nadia Louar Jan 1997

Le "Devenir Féminin" Dans La Sociéte Moderne Occidentale À Travers Les Deux Romans De Virginie Despentes, Nadia Louar

Dissertations and Theses

Les deux premiers romans de Virginie Despentes, Baise-moi (1995) et les Chiennes Savantes (1996), attestent de la mutation socio-culturelle qui affecte la societe contemporaine. Son style insolent, son langage corrosif et volontairement Prosaïque confirme et signe I 'évolution dans le monde occidental des valeurs, des désirs et aspirations de 1'homme, et plus crucialement de la femme des années 90. Plus qu'une révolution des moeurs, on assiste dans ses deux premières oeuvres á une véritable mutation culturelle qui bouleverse les rôles et modéles traditionnels des individus dans la société. Ce bouleversement qui s'exprime dans la vie banale, mais ...


Crossing Boundaries: Land And Sea In Jane Austen's 'Persuasion', Laura Vorachek Jan 1997

Crossing Boundaries: Land And Sea In Jane Austen's 'Persuasion', Laura Vorachek

English Faculty Publications

Jane Austen suggests in Persuasion the pressures that the increased mobility of the middle class placed on the established aristocratic society in her time. Anne Elliot especially brings to light the inherited assumptions of her society. She can marry within her social rank (Mr. Elliot or Charles Musgrove) or marry below her (Wentworth at age 23), but either is a choice within the limits established by her society. One owns land or one does not. But when Wentworth returns a man of name and wealth, he is not a member of the landed gentry nor is he below Anne in ...