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Report Of A Lecture On "George Eliot At The National Portrait Gallery", Elizabeth Gundrey Dec 1995

Report Of A Lecture On "George Eliot At The National Portrait Gallery", Elizabeth Gundrey

The George Eliot Review

In an excellent lecture John Cooper of the National Portrait Gallery showed all the authenticated portraits of George Eliot, contrasting them with those of other women writers of the time such as Charlotte Bronte and Agnes Strickland and quoting contemporaries' views on how good a likeness each was.

The portraits included an early silhouette given to the Gallery by a niece of John Cross; an 1842 watercolour given by Caroline Bray, too delicate to be put on public display; D'Albert Durade's Geneva portrait, painted when she was still mourning her father and struggling with religious doubts; the celebrated ...


George Eliot Birthday Luncheon: The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Beryl Gray Nov 1995

George Eliot Birthday Luncheon: The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Beryl Gray

The George Eliot Review

A friendly neighbor, who knew I was fond of “old things”, recently offered to let me look at a yellowing, crisply fragile newspaper that was in her possession. Unfolded, the crimbling broadsheet proved to be a copy of the Daily Mail for Wednesday, 23 June 1897- the issue commemorating Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee. I gingerly perused it, enjoying it as a period curiosity without really expecting to see anything of specific interest- until I got to page seven, which presented an article headed “Women in the Queen’s Reign. Some Who Have Made Victorian History”.

The piece- which is ...


Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden, Nuneaton Jun 1995

Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Garden, Nuneaton

The George Eliot Review

For those of you who don't know who I am, I am currently the Managing Agent on the Arbury Estate, where I am lucky enough to live in South Farm, which will be familiar to you all as the birthplace of Mary Ann Evans.

I arrived at Arbury approximately 183 years after Robert Evans, Mary Ann's father, who was also the Agent on the Estate and on whom it is my intention to reflect today. Robert was born in 1773, the son of a carpenter. He had a limited early education in the local school which was run ...


Observing Women: Doris Lessing, Christa Wolf, Marguerite Duras, Andrew Jonathan Shields Jan 1995

Observing Women: Doris Lessing, Christa Wolf, Marguerite Duras, Andrew Jonathan Shields

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This dissertation uses a model of observation derived from Michel Foucault's "Discipline and Punish" to examine the relationship between writing and seeing in each of the writers discussed. The disciplinary model of the Panopticon, as Foucault outlines it, constructs a neutral observer, a figure supposedly "without qualities" but nevertheless implicitly male, in part because Western tradition has always constructed men as observers and women as objects of observation. But what happens when a woman takes up this observational position and attempts to become the subject of her own gaze? In "Prisons We Choose to Live Inside", Doris Lessing explicitly ...


Impressions Of Theophrastus Such, Rosemary Ashton Jan 1995

Impressions Of Theophrastus Such, Rosemary Ashton

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot's last published work, Impressions of Theophrastus Such (1879), has hitherto not been much read or attended to by readers, critics, or even scholars. Now two editions have appeared almost simultaneously, both annotated and furnished with readable introductions. While welcoming the revival of the book in this form, I have to confess to not having had my mind much changed about its merits by the skillful introductions of Nancy Henry and DJ. Enright.

The work still seems to me to be chiefly interesting for the extra light it occasionally throws on George Eliot's character representation in the ...


The Transformation Of Rage: Mourning And Creating In George Eliot's Fiction, Peggy Fitzhugh Johnstone Jan 1995

The Transformation Of Rage: Mourning And Creating In George Eliot's Fiction, Peggy Fitzhugh Johnstone

The George Eliot Review

The thesis of this book is as follows. In her early life George Eliot experienced a number of bereavements: the deaths of her baby twin siblings in 1821, after which her mother withdrew emotionally from her life; her mother's own death in 1836, when she was sixteen, and her father's death in 1849. Failing to complete 'the mourning process' adequately, and experiencing unconscious 'rage' as a consequence, Eliot had to work through these and other traumatic experiences as an adult, using her novel-writing as a therapy. Her own unconscious aggression comes out in the aggression of her heroines ...


Thou Shalt Not Read: Maggie's Arrested Development In The Mills On The Floss, Karen E. Hottle Jan 1995

Thou Shalt Not Read: Maggie's Arrested Development In The Mills On The Floss, Karen E. Hottle

The George Eliot Review

The Mill on the Floss opens and closes with visions of a girl out of place - initially in a dream and finally in a grave. In between, this lost soul tries to find her way in the world, and she often uses books as her guides. While books give the young Maggie a certain freedom, her status as a woman in the society into which she is born forces her to read in certain ways which constrain and eventually destroy her.

The opening scenes of the novel establish Maggie's place in the hierarchy of learning. Mr. Tulliver's first ...


Race And Myth: The Spanish Gypsy, Brenda Mckay Jan 1995

Race And Myth: The Spanish Gypsy, Brenda Mckay

The George Eliot Review

Although it cannot be claimed that George Eliot's poetry ranks with her prose fiction, it is nevertheless unjustifiably marginalized in discussion of her work. Among the more distinguished pieces - which include the important blank-verse drama 'Armgart' - is George Eliot's longest excursus into poetry, The Spanish Gypsy. Set in Spain, this drama is the spiritual background of themes later developed in Daniel Deronda, on the nature of racial inter-relationships. In Romola too, Eliot had shown an interest in exploring a culture different from that of England, but also sharing many points of resemblance with that country. The medium of ...


American Branch Report, Linda K. Robertson Jan 1995

American Branch Report, Linda K. Robertson

The George Eliot Review

The annual American dinner of the Fellowship was held on 28 December 1994 at The Harbor House restaurant in San Diego, California, site of the Modem Language Association convention. Arrangements for the dinner were made by Harriet Williams, and Linda Robertson hosted the dinner and served as recorder for the evening. Those who attended included William Baker, Margaret Carter, Catherine Civello, Connie Fulmer, Shoshana Knapp, Carol Martin, Solveig Robinson, and Jeanette Shumaker.


Charles Christian Hennell And George Eliot: Human And Narrative Affinities, Graham Handley Jan 1995

Charles Christian Hennell And George Eliot: Human And Narrative Affinities, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

On 13 November 1841 the twenty-two year old Marian Evans wrote to her then mentor Maria Lewis 'My whole soul has been engrossed in the most interesting of all inquiries for the last few days, and to what results my thoughts may lead, I know not - possibly to one that will startle you'.1 On 16 September 1847 ,just over a year after the publication of her translation of Strauss's Life of Jesus Marian wrote to her close friend Sarah Hennell, whose brother's An Inquiry concerning the Origin of Christianity (2nd edition, 1841) she had just re-read 'with ...


University Of London, Centre For English Studies: Conference Report, Caroline Levine, Mark Turner Jan 1995

University Of London, Centre For English Studies: Conference Report, Caroline Levine, Mark Turner

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot claimed that Romla was written with her 'best blood', and her contemporaries certainly knew and appreciated the novel. Until late in the century Romla was even being regularly employed as a guidebook to Florence. But despite contemporary uses and accolades, the text has been largely overlooked by scholars, who have typically relegated the novel to footnotes and fleeting allusions. In response to this neglect, admirers of Romla have begurr to ask why it has attracted so little scholarly attention, given its thematic and theoretical abundance, its cultural and critical complexity.

In the spirit of what we perceive as ...


Loyola College, Baltimore, Nineteenth-Century Studies Association: Conference Report, Rosealind De Sailly Jan 1995

Loyola College, Baltimore, Nineteenth-Century Studies Association: Conference Report, Rosealind De Sailly

The George Eliot Review

The 14th conference of the Nineteenth Century Studies Association was held at Loyola College, Baltimore, Maryland at the end of March. The conference theme, 'Conflict and Resolution’, allowed examination of the period from the French Revolution to the end of the Victorian era in terms of artistic, literary, philosophical, political, economic, religious, scientific and social change. This rich theme attracted papers on many of the issues that now interest George Eliot scholars and other Victorianists.

Christine Morris (University of South Carolina at Chapel Hill) examined Victorian keepsake annuals in her paper, 'Marketing Femininity in the 1830s: The Case of Heath ...


"Dismal Loneliness": George Eliot, Auguste Comte And "The Lifted Veil", Judith Siford Jan 1995

"Dismal Loneliness": George Eliot, Auguste Comte And "The Lifted Veil", Judith Siford

The George Eliot Review

'The Lifted Veil' is a curious novella from an author who made the organic form so much her own, focusing as it does upon actions which continually interrupt and fragment the narrative; with its emphasis on the supernatural, on bizarre pseudo-scientific experiments, attempted murder and gothic horror it seems out of place in the canon of a maker of 'realist' fictions. Yet bizarre though this tale undoubtedly is, it is not merely the mental aberration from an author under stress that Blackwood supposed it to be.'

In 1859, the year she first offered it for publication, Eliot had been diffident ...


The Twenty-Third George Eliot Memorial Lecture- 1994, Canon Michael Sadgrove Jan 1995

The Twenty-Third George Eliot Memorial Lecture- 1994, Canon Michael Sadgrove

The George Eliot Review

On Sunday, 2 January 1842, Mary Ann Evans's father wrote in his diary: 'Went to Trinity Church in the forenoon" Miss Lewis went with me. Mary Ann did not go. I stopd the sacrament (sic) and Miss Lewis stopd also.' Two weeks later, again: 'Went to church in the forenoon. Mary Ann did not go to church'.

Robert Evans was perhaps principally interested in making sure that his daughter behaved as was proper for a middle class young woman with eligible prospects. Her scruples may have concerned him less. But there is no disguising the genuine grief he felt ...


Horses And Hounds: The Importance Of Animals In The Mills On The Floss, Linda K. Roberston Jan 1995

Horses And Hounds: The Importance Of Animals In The Mills On The Floss, Linda K. Roberston

The George Eliot Review

It is not surprising that George Eliot's The Mill on the Floss, set in rural Warwickshire in the early 1800s, should contain references to domestic animals and livestock. What is remarkable is the variety, including dogs, kittens, sheep, cattle, horses, rabbits, ferrets, rats, snakes, toads, spiders, wasps, snails, bears, wolves, boars, a beaver, a chimpanzee, a lion, and an assortment of fish and fowl. From the barking cur in the opening chapter to Bob Jakin's dog Mumps, who comforts Maggie Tulliver after her disastrous trip down the river with Stephen Guest, Eliot uses animals to develop the setting ...


Obituary Dorothy Edmands 1911-1995 Jan 1995

Obituary Dorothy Edmands 1911-1995

The George Eliot Review

Dorothy Edmands had been a member of the George Eliot Fellowship for well over 30 years and during that time had been a most supportive member... She served on the Fellowship Council for very many of those years and, although a quiet and very modest lady, had been extremely generous. Whenever money was needed for whatever project, Dorothy was there with her ever open purse.

Dorothy trained to be a teacher at Furzedown College in London and began her teaching career at Stratford upon Avon. A few years later she moved to George Street School in Bedworth, her home town ...


New George Eliot Letters At The British Library, William Baker, Donald Hawes Jan 1995

New George Eliot Letters At The British Library, William Baker, Donald Hawes

The George Eliot Review

The British Library Catalogue of Additions to the Manuscripts New Series 1981-1985 (2 vols., London: The British Library, 1994), records the acquisition of new George Eliot letters to its holdings.' Its Index lists under 'Cross nee Evans ... "George Eliot''' three items: 'Letter to J. T. Delane from George Eliot, 1859.61891, f.88'; 'Letter to E. L. Stanley from George Eliot, 1869.61891, f.90'; 'Letters to Florence Hill from George Eliot, [1869-?]- 1873.61891, ff.92-101' (p. 410).

The text of George Eliot's [30 November 1859] letter of protest to Delane, Editor of the London Times, about Newby ...