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Women's Studies

1994

Articles 1 - 26 of 26

Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

Wreath-Laying In Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey Jun 1994

Wreath-Laying In Poet's Corner, Westminster Abbey

The George Eliot Review

What can I say about the great writer whom we are gathered here to commemorate that is new, witty or informative or even interesting? After all, you will appreciate that I am not an academic so I can't offer you a Marxist viewpoint, certainly not a feminist one and not even a deconstructionist one. I'm not a biographer either so can't tell you about my latest book, full of such delicious new theories and completely free of any stuffy old evidence to support them. I'm not involved with the media so I can't tell you ...


A Tribute To Gabriel Woolf On His "Jubilee"- From The President Of The George Eliot Fellowship, Jonathan Ouvry, Jonathan Ouvry Jun 1994

A Tribute To Gabriel Woolf On His "Jubilee"- From The President Of The George Eliot Fellowship, Jonathan Ouvry, Jonathan Ouvry

The George Eliot Review

June 1994 saw the 25th anniversary of Gabriel Woolf s involvement with the George Eliot Fellowship, working with and for the Fellowship in its efforts to promote interest in George Eliot's life and works. We are very fortunate that George Eliot is, and always has been an important element in Gabriel's professional life as an actor and reader, for the partnership has been a particularly happy one.

It was very propitious that Gabriel was reading on BBC Radio his highly acclaimed adaptation of Middlemarch in an unprecedented 50 episodes just as we were seeking someone to open an ...


George Eliot- Bbc2 Night School, Ruth Harris Mar 1994

George Eliot- Bbc2 Night School, Ruth Harris

The George Eliot Review

It is said that Napoleon interviewed his prisoners at three o'clock in the morning when their powers of resistance were at their lowest ebb. My video recorder saved me from testing his theory between the unearthly hours of 2.00 and 4.00 a.m. on Thursday 10th March when BBC2's Night School presented its resource material on the life, work and times of George Eliot. If I had had to stay awake, however, then I think that Professor Rosemary Ashton and her able colleagues would have overcome my powers of resistance with Napoleonic skill. The material was ...


Fallen Women In The Nineteenth-Century Novel, Tom Winnifrith Jan 1994

Fallen Women In The Nineteenth-Century Novel, Tom Winnifrith

The George Eliot Review

Focusing on the figure of the 'fallen woman' in nineteenth-century fiction, Tom Winnifred’s Fallen Women in the Nineteenth-Century Novel examines the sexual mores of fictional characters in the context of nineteenth-century sexual values generally, as well as in light of the personal conduct and reputations of authors who span the century. Winnifred looks sweepingly at the novels of Jane Austen, Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, William Makepeace Thackeray, Charles Dickens and Thomas Hardy. A chapter is devoted to each of these authors, while Mrs. Henry Wood, the focus of the Introduction, serves throughout as a whipping girl and emblem of ...


Notes On Contributors Jan 1994

Notes On Contributors

The George Eliot Review

Jonathan Ouvry is the great-great grandson of George Henry Lewes, and has been President of the Fellowship since 1984.

Kathleen Adams has been Secretary of the Fellowship since 1968. She initiated the Review in 1970, was editor until 1981 and co-editor 1982-91. She published Those of Us Who Loved Her in 1980.

Beryl Gray lectures in literature for the Centre for Extra-Mural Studies, Birkbeck College. She has recently completed an edition of Adam Bede for Everyman Paperbacks and is preparing The Mill on the Floss for the same series.

Graham Handley has published widely on George Eliot, his latest contribution ...


Day School On The Novels Of George Eliot At Birkbeck College, Ian Sutton Jan 1994

Day School On The Novels Of George Eliot At Birkbeck College, Ian Sutton

The George Eliot Review

A seminar on George Eliot's novels was held at Birkbeck College, London, on Saturday, November 13th, 1993. It was chaired by Laurel Brake, of the Extra-Mural Department of London University, and the speakers were Rosemary Ashton, Professor of English at University College, London, Sally Shuttleworth, Senior Lecturer in English at the University of Leeds, and Gillian Beer, Professor of Literature and Narrative at the University of Cambridge.

Rosemary Ashton's paper, was 'The Mill on the Floss and Natural History', which drew interesting parallels between the novel and Darwin's Origin of Species. Ideas on the science of natural ...


American Branch Report, Linda K. Roberston Jan 1994

American Branch Report, Linda K. Roberston

The George Eliot Review

Linda Robertson has worked hard at getting a George Eliot session at the annual MLA Convention, so far without success. But she sends her usual report of a friendly gathering during the Conference which brings together members in the USA.

On December 29 several members of the Fellowship who were attending the Modem Language Association convention in Toronto met for dinner at Butterfield's Restaurant. Linda K. Robertson presided, and others in attendance were Shoshana M. Knapp, Joanna Yin, Nancy Henry, and Paul Lorenz.


Message Of Greeting From The Fellowship President, Jonathan G. Ouvry Jan 1994

Message Of Greeting From The Fellowship President, Jonathan G. Ouvry

The George Eliot Review

If every dog has its day, perhaps every novel has its year and if so this is the year of Middlemarch.

I looked forward to the television production with some misgivings, feeling that it would be impossible for the immense depth and scope of the novel to be adequately conveyed in a few hours of viewing. Adam Bede had been, I thought, entirely unsuccessful, except on a superficial level as a pretty costumed story. The profundity of Middlemarch would not benefit from such treatment. In the end, however, I felt that justice had to a large extent been done, due ...


Tito, Dionysus And Apollo: An Examination Of Tito Melema In Romola, Lesley Gordon Jan 1994

Tito, Dionysus And Apollo: An Examination Of Tito Melema In Romola, Lesley Gordon

The George Eliot Review

Greek myth is significant throughout George Eliot’s work, and is especially important in the characterization of Tito Melema. A particular identification with Dionysus or Bacchus begins early in the novel when Nello, after remarking that the newcomer seems to have come “straight from Olympus: (Ch. 2, 71), later finds that he resembles a young Bacchus or an Apollo (Ch. 4, 87). Further, the term “the stranger”, a common appellation of the god in the ancient world, where he was regarded as a foreigner from over the sea, comes when this stranger in Florence is frequently so called, often by ...


George Eliot In South Africa, Margaret Wolfit Jan 1994

George Eliot In South Africa, Margaret Wolfit

The George Eliot Review

In 1992 I made my first visit to South Africa. I had always wanted to see for myself what life Was like there and come to my own conclusions. It was an extraordinary time to visit. Mandela had been released from goal and a referendum of the whites was announced while we were there. The scene was changing - everywhere people seemed aware of the evils of apartheid, and that things must and would change. My invitation to give readings and speak about George Eliot came directly from that first visit, I was asked to give a course at the 1993 ...


Alfred Austin And George Eliot: Two Unpublished Letters, Kathleen Adams, William Baker Jan 1994

Alfred Austin And George Eliot: Two Unpublished Letters, Kathleen Adams, William Baker

The George Eliot Review

Today, Alfred Lord Tennyson's successor as the Poet Laureate, Alfred Austin (1835- 1913), is a largely forgotten literary name from the late Victorian and Edwardian worlds of yesteryear. Austin's connection with George Eliot and G. H. Lewes will not be found documented in G. S. Haight's nine volume edition of The George Eliot Letters (New Haven, 1954-78) and his name does not appear in its index. The Autobiography of Alfred Austin Poet Laureate 1835-1910 (2 vols., 1911: reprinted AMS Press, New York, 1973) does refer to meetings between George Eliot, George Henry Lewes and Alfred Austin. G ...


Annual Report- 1993, Kathleen Adams Jan 1994

Annual Report- 1993, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

The year's events began in a quite festive manner. Although the Annual General Meeting in March produced no special surprises, it was the 25th anniversary of my election as Fellowship Secretary so I provided cakes instead of the usual mundane biscuits and was presented with a lovely bouquet.

The AGM of the Alliance of Literary Societies followed on April 24th and the Fellowship, as always, was well represented. The John Clare Society were our hosts and we saw some excellent slides of the John Clare Country.

Gabriel Woolf and Rosalind Shanks gave us two splendid evenings of readings a ...


Editor's Notes, Beryl Gray Jan 1994

Editor's Notes, Beryl Gray

The George Eliot Review

After twelve years as its co-editor, Dr. Graham Handley has decided to resign from the Review. He has many exciting literary projects - George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, Anthony Trollope - which are going to occupy him full time, though I know that his continued interest and support are to be counted on.

Dr. Handley's commitment to, and work for, the Journal have been tremendous. We are very grateful to him. I was delighted to be asked to join him two years ago when Kathleen Adams's ever-increasing burden of work made it necessary for her to relinquish her role as editor ...


George Eliot And The British Museum Reading Room, Christopher Date Jan 1994

George Eliot And The British Museum Reading Room, Christopher Date

The George Eliot Review

I have recently undertaken a search of the Central Archives of the British Museum in an attempt to ascertain the date that George Eliot first used the facilities of the Reading Room of, what was then, the British Museum Library. It occurred to me that the George Eliot Fellowship might be interested in the result of my search.

It had been assumed that Eliot had been a reader here from the time of her move to London in 1851 when she became John Chapman's assistant editor on the Westminster Review. However, nothing had been found so far to verify ...


George Eliot's Weimar, Gerlinde Roder-Bolton Jan 1994

George Eliot's Weimar, Gerlinde Roder-Bolton

The George Eliot Review

When George Eliot and G. H. Lewes arrived in Weimar on 2 August 1854, their expectation were high. They had come to Germany primarily to collect material for Lewes's biography of Goethe on which he had been working for some time, but the journey also represented the start of their life together. They had left London on 20 July and travelled via Antwerp, Brussels, Cologne and Frankfurt. At last they would walk through the streets where Goethe, 'the stately Jupiter', I had not so long ago walked himself. But the glimpses George Eliot caught of Weimar on their early ...


Metafiction And Metaphor: Daniel Deronda As Golem, Saleel Nurbhai Jan 1994

Metafiction And Metaphor: Daniel Deronda As Golem, Saleel Nurbhai

The George Eliot Review

A criticism of George Eliot's Daniel Deronda, from Henry James onwards, is that it is a novel of two halves: the realist Gwendolen half, and the visionary Mordecai half. These two are regarded as unable to mesh, and thus weaken the novel in structure and purpose. When examining the novel and a contextual interpretation of the Jewish myth of the golem, however, this bifurcation seems intentional; more than that, it is a metafictional rendering of the theme in the novel's structure.

The term golem is central to mythical creation in Judaism. It means an unformed mass. Before he ...


The Bbc Middlemarch, Ian Mackillop Jan 1994

The Bbc Middlemarch, Ian Mackillop

The George Eliot Review

From 12th January to 16th February 1994 the BBC screened its six-part Middlemarch, produced by Louis Marks, scripted by Andrew Davies and directed by Anthony Page, six safe hands (too safe?). It has been issued as a two-cassette videogram (BBCV 5253, 1994) in two parts, the original episode-breaks removed; references here are to hour-minute-second of these tapes. The production is like a grand Folio Society edition.

The BBC Middlemarch is a browns-and-greens 'painterly' production, much of the extravagance of the original bled away. The two principals are given a dignity which Eliot did not make them suffer. Ladislaw (Rufus Sewell ...


Women And Jews In Daniel Deronda, Pam Hirsch Jan 1994

Women And Jews In Daniel Deronda, Pam Hirsch

The George Eliot Review

When Daniel Deronda was first published in 1876 George Eliot was disappointed that readers tended to 'cut the book into scraps and talk of nothing in it but Gwendolen. I meant everything in the book to be related to everything else there'.1 Her contemporary readers had failed to see the connections she had forged between the condition of Jews in British society and the condition of women in British society at a specific moment in history. By 1876 Jews in England had, like Dissenters and Catholics, been allowed to hold most public offices since 1828. In 1858 Rothschild had ...


George Eliot And The Politics Of National Inheritance, Bernard Semmel Jan 1994

George Eliot And The Politics Of National Inheritance, Bernard Semmel

The George Eliot Review

This is a study of George Eliot's political imagination which traces the theme of inheritance through her fiction, taking it both in its ordinary sense of property bequeathed from one generation to another and in the extended sense of the transmission of a nation's culture and traditions. The theme is important in that it shows George Eliot's response to the alienating conditions of modem society and defines her - with 'her deep sense of dependence on the past, her commitment to the English political tradition, and her vision of English nationality' - as an essentially conservative thinker in the ...


George Eliot's Serial Fiction, Carol A. Martin Jan 1994

George Eliot's Serial Fiction, Carol A. Martin

The George Eliot Review

In the past few years, there has been considerable renewed interest in serial literature in the form of single author and general studies. Martin's book on Eliot takes its place alongside works such as Mary Hamer's book on Trollope, Writing by Numbers (1987), Hughes's and Lund's The Victorian Serial (1991), and Harris's and Myers's (eds.) Serials and Their Readers (1993). Martin's study focuses on Eliot's four full-length serializations of Scenes of Clerical Life in Blackwood's Magazine, Romola in Cornhill Magazine, and Middlemarch and Daniel Deronda in part-issue, and provides a publishing ...


The Critical Response To George Eliot, Rosalind De Sailly, Karen L. Pangallo Jan 1994

The Critical Response To George Eliot, Rosalind De Sailly, Karen L. Pangallo

The George Eliot Review

The appearance of a new anthology of George Eliot criticism would need to justify its place on the shelf beside the indispensable collections of essays assembled by Gordon S. Haight, D.R. Carroll, William Baker, Barbara Hardy and K.M. Newton. However, so much valuable and interesting Eliot criticism has been published in the past two decades that there is still room for a critical revaluation of this work. Karen Pangallo's George Eliot: A Reference Guide, 1972-1987 (Boston: G .K. Hall, 1990), is evidence of her knowledge in this area. However, the gap for a good selection of recent ...


The Real Life Of Mary Ann Evans: George Eliot, Her Letters And Fiction, Rosemarie Bodenheimer Jan 1994

The Real Life Of Mary Ann Evans: George Eliot, Her Letters And Fiction, Rosemarie Bodenheimer

The George Eliot Review

This is an important biographical and critical study which takes for its starting point George Eliot's view in 1879 that 'The best history of a writer is contained in his writings - these are his chief actions' (The George Eliot Letters, VII, 230). Rosemarie Bodenheimer - who courageously ignores the current equalization stance of referring to Eliot and Evans - begins with an exemplary chapter, 'On Reading Letters'. She observes 'Letters and novels are both acts of self-representation in writing and, as such, may both be taken, to begin with, as fictions.' This is a neat and persuasive way in, though there ...


The Sickroom In Victorian Fiction: The Art Of Being Ill, Miriam Bailin Jan 1994

The Sickroom In Victorian Fiction: The Art Of Being Ill, Miriam Bailin

The George Eliot Review

In this densely-argued and fascinating study Miriam Bailin begins by noting the frequency with which the sickroom figures in Victorian fiction as 'a haven of comfort, order and natural affection' in which an alternative, and more congenial, society is created around the invalid and the tormenting moral complexities of life outside, the difficulties of reconciling past and present selves, are simplified. In 'Janet's Repentance', a key text for Bailin, George Eliot writes: 'Within the four walls where the stir and glare of the world are shut out, where a human being lies prostrate, thrown on the tender mercies of ...


Engaging With Shakespeare: Responses Of George Eliot And Other Women Novelists, Marianne Novy Jan 1994

Engaging With Shakespeare: Responses Of George Eliot And Other Women Novelists, Marianne Novy

The George Eliot Review

Virginia Woolf's comment, 'Literature is no one's private ground; literature is common ground', is a reminder in this age of intertextuality that writers have always lived off one another. Shakespeare himself was no exception. Marianne Novy's interest begins, however, with response rather than replication, and especially with the reasons why women novelists are drawn to Shakespeare. Unlike Sandra Gilbert and Susan Gubar, the authors of The Madwoman in the Attic (1979), who portray male writers as essentially alienating to women, Novy shows how women who feel marginalized respond to Shakespeare the outsider, mourning his 'outcast state'; how ...


Annual Report 1994, Kathleen Adams Jan 1994

Annual Report 1994, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

The year got off to an unusual start. The hyperbole associated with the BBC Television production of Middlemarch suddenly shot George Eliot into the forefront of many people's minds. The beginning of the year is always a very busy time but from January onwards I was inundated with letters and phone calls. For three weeks the Fellowship became a full-time occupation. The BBC in London and in Coventry were in regular contact, admirers of George Eliot had their interest newly aroused, students aimed enquiries at us, local clubs and societies wanted talks and tours of the George Eliot Country ...


American Branch Report, Linda Roberston Jan 1994

American Branch Report, Linda Roberston

The George Eliot Review

Several members of the Fellowship in America attended the 1992 MLA Convention in New York in December. On the 28th they gathered together for a Dinner Meeting at Warwick Hotel, New York City.

Harriet Williams, Vice-President of the Fellowship, presided; Linda K. Robertson was moderator of the Special Session discussion; Marjorie Goss was Recorder. Others present were William Baker, Catalina Hannan, Conrad Harper, Shoshana Milgram Knapp, Michael Wolff, and Joanna Yin.

The Fellowship gave a toast to the immortal memory of George Eliot.

The discussion began with the matter of continuing to try to get Allied Organisation status. This requires ...