Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Comparative Literature Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 29 of 29

Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

Oration Of Kathleen Adams Jul 1992

Oration Of Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

If William Shakespeare is the most famous writer to have come out of Warwickshire, the runner-up is undoubtedly George Eliot. Her greatest novel, Middlemarch, reflects the life of the city of Coventry in the early nineteenth century. Mrs. Kathleen Adams is herself a native of Coventry and has completed 25 years as the secretary of the George Eliot Fellowship. She attended Barr's Hill Grammar School; after leaving school she worked in the local Inland Revenue office where she met her future husband. After the birth of her two children she worked for 23 years as a school secretary at ...


Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Gardens, Nuneaton, Michael Sadgrove Jun 1992

Wreath-Laying In The George Eliot Memorial Gardens, Nuneaton, Michael Sadgrove

The George Eliot Review

I am honoured to have been asked to lay a wreath in memory of George Eliot this afternoon. And, I can truly say, I do it in grateful memory. Not many years ago I would have to have confessed that I had not yet read any of her novels. On coming to Coventry, I decided to remedy this situation. For me, whatever town or city I have lived in, its sense of place has been defined very much by its literary associations, the part it has played in the imaginations of its writers and poets. As far as Coventry is ...


Westminster Abbey Wreath-Laying June 20th 1992, Kathleen Adams Jun 1992

Westminster Abbey Wreath-Laying June 20th 1992, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot and religion is a vast subject and one that can only be lightly touched on today. But it is relevant to our being here because of the memorial stone in front of us. It took 100 years to get here and, because of the years of fund-raising by the George Eliot Fellowship as well as the many visits to the Abbey to negotiate the placing of the memorial stone in Poets' Corner in June 1980, is perhaps even more significant to us than a tomb or memorial would be that bad been erected in 1880 instead of 1980 ...


Bibliography For Work In Comparative Literature And Culture, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 1992

Bibliography For Work In Comparative Literature And Culture, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

CLCWeb Library

No abstract provided.


Finch, Burney, Barbauld And The Brontes: Feminine Identity, Lori Ann Davis Jan 1992

Finch, Burney, Barbauld And The Brontes: Feminine Identity, Lori Ann Davis

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Modern readers of literature have occasionally noticed similarities in the themes and imagery of British women writers. These similarities have been argued as springing from either a shared cultural heritage or a gender-specific biological experience. Proponents of the 'nurture' camp suggest that common life experiences within western culture, including a shared literary history, political invisibility, and domestic responsibilities which set definite limits on intellectual pursuits worked to create in these women a shared consciousness, intimately connected to their personal identities, which encodes a distinctly feminine imprint on much of their work. Proponents of the 'nature' camp, on the other hand ...


A Taxonomy Of The Female Private Detective In Contemporary Literature, Michele Marie Regenold Jan 1992

A Taxonomy Of The Female Private Detective In Contemporary Literature, Michele Marie Regenold

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The name Sherlock Holmes is nearly synonymous with the word detective for many people due to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's vastly popular ratiocinative detective stories. However, Edgar Allan Poe is considered the author of the first ratiocinative or classical detective story in the 1840s. Poe introduced and Doyle masterfully articulated the classical detective formula while writers such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers continued the classical tradition well into the twentieth century (Cawelti 80).


The Twenty-First George Eliot Memorial Lecture: The Names Of George Eliot, Ruth M. Harris Jan 1992

The Twenty-First George Eliot Memorial Lecture: The Names Of George Eliot, Ruth M. Harris

The George Eliot Review

'What's in a name?’ asked Juliet. Our response would surely be different if Romeo were no longer called Romeo, and from that romantic balcony in Verona there came the cry: 'O Egbert, Egbert, wherefore art thou, Egbert?' As an exploration of George Eliot's names should reveal, there is far more significance in names than Juliet or we might imagine.

Allowing for minor differences, George Eliot chose or was given seventeen different names during her life-time: Mary Ann(e) Evans, Little Mama, Marianne Evans, Marian Evans, Clematis, Deutera, Polly, Pollian, Marian Lewes, Marian Evans Lewes, Mutter, Madonna, The Prioress ...


Review Of George Eliot, Kristin Brady Jan 1992

Review Of George Eliot, Kristin Brady

The George Eliot Review

The general editors of this series, Eva Figes and Adele King, explain that there is a need for their series of feminist readings because much of the criticism on selected women writers by male critics is usually unfair, false or simplistic (vii). Kristin Brady very quickly and effectively proves their point in the first chapter of George Eliot by referring to many influential nineteenth- and twentieth-century male critics who were often more preoccupied with Eliot's appearance or what they judged to be her suspect femininity than with a straightforward consideration of her artistic achievements. Among such critics, says Brady ...


Review Of George Eliot And The Conflict Of Interpretations: A Reading Of The Novels, David Carroll Jan 1992

Review Of George Eliot And The Conflict Of Interpretations: A Reading Of The Novels, David Carroll

The George Eliot Review

Towards the climax of Felix Holt Esther Lyon moves centre stage. Mist around her own history and that of Transome Court dissolves to reveal a vista of possibilities. The narrator comments: 'Esther found it impossible to read in these days; her life was a book which she seemed to be constructing - trying to make character clear before her, and looking into the ways of destiny'. This lovely sentence might serve as the epigraph to David Carroll's study. A character in a novel, who is well-versed in romance narrative, finds herself an author, 'constructing' the book of her own life ...


Review Of Realist Fiction And The Strolling Spectator, John Rignall Jan 1992

Review Of Realist Fiction And The Strolling Spectator, John Rignall

The George Eliot Review

The problem of vision, of what the artist or writer sees, is among the most fascinating of the links between literature and painting, which separates them both from music. Vision itself implies something seen which cannot be separated from an inner quality of how it is seen. The I seeing and the eye seeing involves a synthesis which again distinguishes them both from the camera. The presence of this 'magic' which resists analysis has obsessed artists as frequently as critics, and led them to reject what seemed incapable of completion. A poem, according to W.H. Auden, was never finished ...


El Dialecto En Las Primeras Novelas De Geroge Eliot: Grafia Y Vocalismo, Maria Fuencisla Garcia-Bermejo Giner Jan 1992

El Dialecto En Las Primeras Novelas De Geroge Eliot: Grafia Y Vocalismo, Maria Fuencisla Garcia-Bermejo Giner

The George Eliot Review

This is an examination of Scenes o/Clerical Life, Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss and Silas Marner from the point of view of the linguist. The author points to these novels as repositories of examples of dialect speech of the Midlands in the first part of the nineteenth century. That George Eliot was interested in language and languages, and that she had a passion for getting local detail right makes it unthinkable, according to the author, that her use of dialect in these novels could be anything other than authentic. The examples of dialect speech by characters in ...


Message Of Greetings From The Fellowship President, Jonathan G. Ouvry Jan 1992

Message Of Greetings From The Fellowship President, Jonathan G. Ouvry

The George Eliot Review

Having left the composition of my message to members of the Fellowship, as always, until the last possible moment, I looked to see whether I could find some words of George Eliot appropriate to my predicament. In such a situation Mr. Alexander Main is a tremendous help. His compilation of Wise, Witty and Tender Sayings of George Eliot saves hours of looking through the real thing. As always, I did not look in vain, and, further vacillation being out of the question, I now greet my fellow members, having enjoyed a further successful year, and looking forward to the next ...


The Clerical Character In George Eliot's Fiction, Oliver Lovesey Jan 1992

The Clerical Character In George Eliot's Fiction, Oliver Lovesey

The George Eliot Review

Writing to Blackwood in November 1856 to introduce Scenes of Clerical Life, G.H. Lewes promised,

tales and sketches illustrative of the actual life of our country clergy about a quarter of a century ago; but solely in its 'human' and 'not at all' in its 'theological' aspect; the object being to do what has never yet been done in our Literature, for we have abundant religious stories polemical and doctrinal, but since the Vicar and Miss Austen, no stories representing the clergy like any other class with the humours, sorrows, and troubles of other men.

Oliver Lovesey's new ...


Review Of Middlemarch: A Study Of Provincial Life, Kathleen Porter Jan 1992

Review Of Middlemarch: A Study Of Provincial Life, Kathleen Porter

The George Eliot Review

I read Middlemarch for the first time in the Everyman's Library edition of 1930, a trim book in two volumes with a note by Leslie Stephen by way of Introduction. The note was taken from the Essay on George Eliot in Hours in a Library, and is less than helpful to the reader. Stephen notices the high moral ideal George Eliot sets before us, but laments the absence of charm, or magic, which he found in her earlier works.

The new Middlemarch from Everyman's Library is an elegant book in one volume, convenient in size and moderately priced ...


George Eliot Birthday Luncheon: November 24th 1991, Gina Quant Jan 1992

George Eliot Birthday Luncheon: November 24th 1991, Gina Quant

The George Eliot Review

Moving house - that worrying, complicated, exciting experience we've all had! - And moving house in November too - not an inspiring month for new beginnings!

But it was just that upheaval of moving house, and just at this time of year, that Marian and George Henry Lewes were undergoing as they moved into their new home, The Priory, 128 years ago. Marian describes in a letter how the domestic problems of moving house were diverting her from the work she so relished:

Before we began to move, I was swimming in Comte and Euripides and Latin Christianity: Now I have a ...


Adam Bede: Author, Narrator And Narrative, Cynthia Huggins Jan 1992

Adam Bede: Author, Narrator And Narrative, Cynthia Huggins

The George Eliot Review

Readers of novels seem to have a natural, almost instinctive, tendency to perceive the voices of the author and the omniscient narrator as being one and the same. This tendency is even stronger when the narrator is blatantly intrusive, frequently inserting his own opinions into the objective narrative material of the novel. And although there are certainly some novelists who truly intend their narrative voices to be perceived as their own, this is not the case with George Eliot in Adam Bede.

In analyzing the narrative voice in this particular novel, I was struck by the almost total agreement, on ...


Bbc Television's Film Of Adam Bede, Kathleen Adams Jan 1992

Bbc Television's Film Of Adam Bede, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

This adaption was not for the academic, the scholar or the purist. As none of these, I admit that, with reservations, I enjoyed the film.

There were some very good things about it. The setting was very attractive (Stanway in the Cotswolds for much of the action because it is one of the least changed parts of England) and the photography superb, particularly in the Chase when the sunlight filtering through the trees made an extremely pretty picture. The fight between Arthur and Adam was well staged. lain Glen as Adam portrayed the strength and integrity of the character convincingly ...


Dearly Beloved Scott, Margaret Wolfit Jan 1992

Dearly Beloved Scott, Margaret Wolfit

The George Eliot Review

When Mary Ann Evans was seven years old, her elder sister Chrissie was lent a copy of Waverley. Unfortunately, the book had to be returned before Mary Ann had finished reading it: this distressed her greatly, and she began to write out the story herself.

Maggie Tulliver, in The Mill on the Floss, says of Scott's novel The Pirate,

'Oh, I began it once. I read to where Minna is walking with Cleveland and I could never get to read the rest. I went on with it in my own head, and I made several endings - but they were ...


The George Eliot Review: Journal Of The George Eliot Fellowship: 1992 No. 23, Graham Handley, Beryl Gray Jan 1992

The George Eliot Review: Journal Of The George Eliot Fellowship: 1992 No. 23, Graham Handley, Beryl Gray

The George Eliot Review

Contents

Notes on Contributors.............. 4

Jonathan Ouvry: Message of Greeting from the Fellowship President................. 5

Editorial Notes........................ 6

Kathleen Adams: Annual Report 1991...................... 7

Graham Handley & Beryl Gray: London Branch Report 1991....................... 11

Joanne Shattock: Wreath-laying in the George Eliot Memorial Gardens, Nuneaton, June 16th 1991........................ 14

Bill Adams: Wreath-laying at Westminster Abbey, June 22nd 1992..................... 18

Gina Quant: The Toast to the Immortal Memory. George Eliot Birthday Luncheon, 24th November 1991...................... 21

Jenny Uglow: George Eliot and Mrs. Gaskell. The Twentieth George Eliot Memorial Lecture, 26th October 1991...................25


George Eliot's First Family: The Bartons Of Shepperton, Michael Wolff Jan 1992

George Eliot's First Family: The Bartons Of Shepperton, Michael Wolff

The George Eliot Review

There are a lot of 'firsts' in the few months between September 1856 when Marian Evans Lewes began 'The Sad Fortunes of the Reverend Amos Barton' and February 1857 when she adopted George Eliot as a pseudonym. The Bartons were the first of her many families. The words of the title were, according to her own recollection, the first words of her new career. She was at the time in the process of making a new, it could be argued, a 'first family', in the new life she was sharing with George Henry Lewes and his young sons. And George ...


London Branch Report 1991, Graham Handley, Beryl Gray Jan 1992

London Branch Report 1991, Graham Handley, Beryl Gray

The George Eliot Review

Although the London Branch undertook nothing specific this year, it was represented by Graham Handley, Beryl Gray, Michael Forrest and Margaret Wolfit at a pleasant ceremony in Richmond on 22nd April 1992, when a plaque commemorating George Eliot was unveiled on the site of 8 Park Shot. The following address was given by Mr. Tim Brilton, Chairman of Richmond Magistrates' Court:

Mr. Mayor, Madam Mayoress, Ladies and Gentlemen - on behalf of the Richmond bench it gives me great pleasure to welcome the Mayor of Richmond, Councillor McKinney and the Mayoress to our ceremony this afternoon. We are pleased to welcome ...


Middlemarch's Dorothea Brooke And Medieval Hagiography, Judith Johnston Jan 1992

Middlemarch's Dorothea Brooke And Medieval Hagiography, Judith Johnston

The George Eliot Review

Saint Theresa's life of achievement is offered as a contrast to the heroine of Middlemarch, Dorothea Brooke, and all that Dorothea fails to achieve. George Eliot examines Dorothea' s life in part through the medium of medieval hagiography, a form which recognises the tensions and crises through which a martyr passes. But George Eliot depends upon the paradox that martyrdom is achieved as readily from submissiveness and ineffectuality as from resistance and effective administration. Thus Eliot offers the reader a heroine whose life passes through a state of metamorphosis which is very like the passage through martyrdom regardless of ...


New George Eliot Letters, William Baker Jan 1992

New George Eliot Letters, William Baker

The George Eliot Review

My hunt through the archives of the world for unpublished George Henry Lewes letters for a forthcoming edition of his letters has so far thrown up over 450 unpublished letters in his hand. It would hardly be surprising if the search sometimes produced unpublished George Eliot letters and related documents. A February 1991 letter to Charles W. Mann, Chief Rare Books and Special Collections at the Pattee Library, the Pennsylvania State University Library, resulted in a rich harvest of materials. The Allison-Shelley Collection of over 10,000 books and many thousands of letters, manuscripts and drawings was bequeathed to the ...


Review Of George Eliot: Selected Critical Writings, Rosemary Ashton Jan 1992

Review Of George Eliot: Selected Critical Writings, Rosemary Ashton

The George Eliot Review

Walter Houghton made duality, and especially opposites, the keystone of his analysis of the Victorian frame of mind. Eliot's mind fits happily into that dualistic frame. Was she George or Marian (or any variation of the latter)? Was she the contriver of the novels or was it her husband? Was she hypochondriac or valetudinarian, diffident or arrogant, prominent or retiring, imposing or horse-faced? The identity remains fascinatingly protean.

If deciding whether Eliot was novelist or poet is less difficult than a similar decision with regard to Hardy, the common reader (and more particularly the paperback purchaser) has been at ...


Versatile Victorian; Selected Critical Writings Of George Henry Lewes, Rosemary Ashton Jan 1992

Versatile Victorian; Selected Critical Writings Of George Henry Lewes, Rosemary Ashton

The George Eliot Review

This admirable collection, its succinct introduction indicating the range and quality of Lewes's criticism, is a feast This is the place to taste Lewes selectively. I like to think: that it is true that the best part of an author's life lies in his/her own writing, and these occasional pieces and essays reflect Lewes's vibrant and vital personality, with his unashamed expressions of delight in what he likes and the unequivocal evaluations of what he doesn't. Even when he is subjective we are aware of the play of intellect. He can be provocative, as the ...


Review Of Gordon S. Haight; George Eliot's Originals And Contemporaries: Essays In Victorian Literary History And Biography, Hugh Witemeyer Jan 1992

Review Of Gordon S. Haight; George Eliot's Originals And Contemporaries: Essays In Victorian Literary History And Biography, Hugh Witemeyer

The George Eliot Review

It is good to meet old friends, to discover again who is the real heroine of Middlemarch and to realise that Ladislaw can be defended and that Or Leavis was deaf to George Eliot's irony. Casaubon may not really have been impotent. All those theories about originals have been thoroughly tested, evaluated, replaced or re-stated by the investigative particularity of an eminent George Eliot scholar and, as some would have us believe, her definitive biographer (though I do not accept this last claim). Was Klesmer Liszt or, as appears more likely, a mercurial Rubinstein? Was Casaubon Mark Pattison? Does ...


Review Of Greatness Engendered: George Eliot And Virginia Woolf, Alison Booth Jan 1992

Review Of Greatness Engendered: George Eliot And Virginia Woolf, Alison Booth

The George Eliot Review

This detailed study is in the series Reading Women Writing, and it presupposes not only a familiarity with everything that George Eliot and Virginia Woolf wrote but also a comprehensive knowledge of scholarship and criticism about them. Miss Booth writes with verve and, at times, directness and wit. She tells us that 'In effect Eliot and Woolf are palace spies, consorting with patriarchal traditions to expose their flaws.' The ensuing examination is a searching one which moves from acknowledged subjectivity to informed (and consistent) perspectives. The weight of running scholarship and cross reference sometimes threatens to sink the narrative, but ...


Annual Report- 1992, Kathleen Adams Jan 1992

Annual Report- 1992, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

As I reach the end of my 25 years as Secretary of the Fellowship I inevitably look back to the beginning of my years of office and, as I prepared this report, to the first one I delivered 24 years ago. It covered half of a sheet of quarto paper. The events recorded were insignificant compared to our current programme but we did have Richard Church as our Guest of Honour at the Birthday Dinner in 1968. Our membership for that year had just reached 60, 7 of whom were life members.

1992 began, as always, with a quiet Annual ...


London Branch Report 1992, Graham Handley, Beryl Gray Jan 1992

London Branch Report 1992, Graham Handley, Beryl Gray

The George Eliot Review

The London Branch celebrated George Eliot's birthday by bolding a luncheon in her honor on 29th November at St Philip’s Church, Earls Court Road, London W8. This was attended by about 40 members and friends, and was preceded by a programme of readings devised by Margaret Wolfit and taken from Romola and Daniel Deronda. Margaret had chosen the appropriate title of The Italian Connection, and her sequence of extracts was greatly appreciated by the audience who listened to her with rapt attention for more than an hour. The luncheon followed, and once again we are indebted to Michael ...