Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Comparative Literature Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Women's Studies

1987

Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

George Eliot And Friendship The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Ina Taylor Nov 1987

George Eliot And Friendship The Toast To The Immortal Memory, Ina Taylor

The George Eliot Review

Before going on to my chosen subject I thought you might like to hear a little about this new biography of George Eliot. You could indeed be forgiven for saying, 'Not another biography of George Eliot'. A new study must come out most years, either in this country or in America and I would be the first to admit that the definitive biography by Gordon Haight will not be superseded for some time. So what more is there to say about the great lady?

Well, after reading Haight and others, I was struck by the fact that of George Eliot ...


Westminster Abbey Wreather Abbey Wreath-Laying, John Kane Jun 1987

Westminster Abbey Wreather Abbey Wreath-Laying, John Kane

The George Eliot Review

We are here today to pay our respects and do homage to the memory of a great artist and an astonishing woman. Although she died over a hundred years ago, I know that to many members of the George Eliot Fellowship and to readers around the world, she is still our contemporary and to some, she is more vibrant and alive than many living authors. But what if she really were alive today? What if we were actually here not to lay a wreath but to meet the woman herself. I for one would approach the event with some ambivalence ...


A Newly Purchased Letter, T. Clifford Allbutt Feb 1987

A Newly Purchased Letter, T. Clifford Allbutt

The George Eliot Review

The following letter has recently been purchased by Nuneaton Museum and Art Gallery and its pubIication here (as far as we are aware, for the first time) is with the Curator's kind permission. Unfortunately, no year is shown with the date, neither is the correspondent addressed in any other way than by 'My dear Sir', so it has been impossible to discover to whom it was written. All one can say is that it was penned sometime between 1890 (the date of publication of Oscar Browning's Life of George Eliot) and 1925 when Sir Thomas Clifford Allbutt, the ...


The George Elliot Fellowship Review 1987 No.18, Kathleen Adams, Graham Handley Jan 1987

The George Elliot Fellowship Review 1987 No.18, Kathleen Adams, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

CONTENTS 1987

President’s Message 6

Annual Report- 1986 7

Accounts- 1986 15

Treasurer’s Report- 1986 16

George Eliot Memorial Lecture- 1986: Silas Marner: Filming the Novel by Louis Marks 16

Nuneanton Wreath-laying- June 1986 24

Westminster Abbey Wreath-laying- 1986 25

Shakespearean Allusionsin ‘Janet’s Repentance by A.G. van den Broek 27

Book Reviews:

The Clarendon Edition of Middlemerch edited by David Carroll 40

George Eliot and 19th Century Science: The Make-Believe of a Beginning by Sally Shuttleworh 42

George Eliot by Gillian Beer 43

Poem: At the Grave of George Eliot by Amy Clampitt 46

A ...


A Hard Moral Core, Vic Hopkins Jan 1987

A Hard Moral Core, Vic Hopkins

The George Eliot Review

The novelist C. P. Snow, reviewing a book on George Eliot by Robert Speaight (1954), seeking an answer to his own question: “Which of the Victorian novelists means much to the younger writers today?", after rejecting most of them, finally selected George Eliot, who, in her time, he explained

"received a complete esteem not given to any other English novelist, and who afterwards became regarded as a faintly comic monument.”

I paused over the statement, puzzled and fearing worse might follow, but mercifully the writer of it, buoyed perhaps by the thought II serious art needs a hard moral core ...


George Eliot's Wesleyan Madonna, Elsie B. Homes Jan 1987

George Eliot's Wesleyan Madonna, Elsie B. Homes

The George Eliot Review

George Eliot's "favorite painting in all the world" was Raphael's "Sistine Madonna”, which she and George Henry Lewes first viewed at Dresden when she was writing Adam Bede. In her journal, she recorded that on her first sight of the painting she sat down briefly, but then "a sort of awe, as if I were suddenly in the presence of some glorious being, made my heart swell too much for me to remain comfortably, and we hurried out of the room" (Haight 264). Each day as they came to the gallery, they would return last to what Lewes ...


The Manuscript Of Daniel Deronda: A Change In Sequence?, Graham Handley Jan 1987

The Manuscript Of Daniel Deronda: A Change In Sequence?, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

The examination of a great writer's manuscript carries its own fascinations and frustrations, for eyes and mind are intent on discovery, with might-have-been replacing is at the blink of an eyelid. Deletions hide something of significance, single-word alterations are evidence of a change of mind (or of heart), and commonplaces are elevated by a single deft stroke or slant into transcendent maxims or inscrutable morality. Re-shaped sentences take on a greater profundity of thought, while paragraphs collated with the first printing or a later corrected one, show either the wisdom of reflection or the author's obstinacy, depending on ...


Shakespearean Allusions In 'Janet's Repentance', A.G. Van Den Broek Jan 1987

Shakespearean Allusions In 'Janet's Repentance', A.G. Van Den Broek

The George Eliot Review

This paper is part of a comprehensive survey of Shakespeare's influence on George Eliot's writing, an influence widely recognised by critics but rarely given the detailed analysis it deserves. It seems to me that, a study of this sort is needed because Shakespeare belongs to that enormous "choir" of philosophers, theologians, writers, poets, dramatists and scientists on whom Eliot drew when shaping her philosophy of life and art; a "choir" which with "mild persistence urge man's search/ To vaster issues. I offer this critique of "Janet's Repentance", therefore, as something to be compared with studies that ...


To Pray Or Not To Pray, Kathleen Adams Jan 1987

To Pray Or Not To Pray, Kathleen Adams

The George Eliot Review

No-one who has read George Eliot's novels can be unaware of her interest in the clergy as characters for her fiction - Amos Barton, Mr. Gilfil, Mr. Tryan, Mr. Irwine, Rufus Lyon - or of her knowledge of various expressions of faith - Evangelical, Methodist, Independent, through to ..Judaism in her final novel, Daniel Deronda. She writes of the clergy with a minimum of caricature, some criticism, but she is never without compassion.

Reading her letters confirms this interest as well as her Iife-Iong search for knowledge of the subject and, because her quest is so well documented, her views and her ...


Book Review: The Clarendon Edition Of Middlemarch, Kathleen Porter Jan 1987

Book Review: The Clarendon Edition Of Middlemarch, Kathleen Porter

The George Eliot Review

We welcome the Clarendon edition of George Eliot’s Middlemarch, which is generally considered to be her greatest novel. It took her about three years to write, and it seems to have caused a good deal of trouble to all concerned.

David Carroll's splendid Introduction, although not intended to be biographical, offers the reader a glimpse of the working life of the Leweses. As the Editor tells us, George Eliot left no detailed account of the 'germ' of Middlemarch, but her letters to John Blackwood gave hints that an 'English novel' was in her mind as early as 1867 ...


Tea And Sprouts, Gabriel Woolf Jan 1987

Tea And Sprouts, Gabriel Woolf

The George Eliot Review

Does the Englishman eat and drink only to stay alive? Using evidence provided by George Eliot, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Jerome K. Jerome, Lewis Carroll and the poetic ponderings of mighty and minor poets, Gabriel Woolf took a Iighthearted look into the English cornucopia, trying to determine whether it contained any more than our national beverage TEA and a vegetable he clearly does not savour himself - SPROUTS! Are the English the only people daft enough to eat sprouts, he clearly wondered - and we still don't know, for no evidence has appeared which proves them to be part ...


Book Review: George Eliot, Kathleen Adams, Jennifer Uglow Jan 1987

Book Review: George Eliot, Kathleen Adams, Jennifer Uglow

The George Eliot Review

When I first heard that Virago were to pubIish a book about George Eliot (the author sought my help in locating certain photographs) I was a Iittle apprehensive. I feared that this might be a militant feminist view of a lady who concerned herself deeply about the 'Woman Question' but who did not align herself with the growing Victorian feminist movement. But a first reading allayed my fears, for Jennifer Uglow treats her subject with sympathy and understanding and does not try to prove that George Eliot was an active feminist when she was not.

The book opens with a ...


Book Review: George Eliot And Nineteenth-Century Science: The Make-Believe Of A Beginning, Graham Handley Jan 1987

Book Review: George Eliot And Nineteenth-Century Science: The Make-Believe Of A Beginning, Graham Handley

The George Eliot Review

This is a sustained investigation of the novels (Scenes of Clerical Life is virtually omitted) and the scientific climate and knowledge which inform them. It is a necessary and stimulating book, firmly anchored in 19th century scientific: theory. It underpins what we have always known but never perhaps spelled out fully, and that is the depth and width of George Eliot's scientific interests and how she integrated them into her work. Dr. Shuttleworth notes that George Eliot's knowledge of science was 'unmatched by any of her peers' and at the same time indicates the centre of her own ...


Mrs. Transome And 'Desecrated Sanctities', H.S. Kakar Jan 1987

Mrs. Transome And 'Desecrated Sanctities', H.S. Kakar

The George Eliot Review

As George Eliot's Introduction to Felix Holt would lead one to expect, the crux of the tragedy which this novel embodies is the "pity and terror" evoked by the "downfall of blindly-climbing hopes", rather than mere peripatetic - the 'discovery' of Mrs. Transome's guilty past. As always in her novels, the tragic reversal that really matters is not an external incident: it is internalised and is closely linked with moral 'recognition'. Mrs. Transome's agonised consciousness of her violated conscience, which the reader shares all through, is a prominent element in her suffering. The scene in the White Hart ...


Message Of Greeting From The Fellowship President, Jonathan G. Ouvry Jan 1987

Message Of Greeting From The Fellowship President, Jonathan G. Ouvry

The George Eliot Review

Having very much enjoyed my three year spell as President of the Fellowship I was delighted and honoured to hear from Kathleen Adams that I had been re-elected. She allayed my suspicion that this was simply to avoid the expense of reprinting the letterheading, pointing out that Ann Reader had retired from the Treasurership so that change. was, in any event, inevitable. I would like to add my personal thanks to Ann for all her tireless work in keeping the Fellowship on a sound financial basis over a very long period, and at the same time wish her successor a ...


Annual Report 1987 Jan 1987

Annual Report 1987

The George Eliot Review

Before I began this, my 20th. annual Report, 1 looked back to my first and found, to my amusement, that it was a mere half quarto page! During that year we had visited the Amold Bennett Country, seen the play of 'Wutherlng Heights', and our Guest of Honour at the Dinner was the writer, Richard Church, a kinsman of George Eliot. Our total membership was 60.

1987 was inevitably a quieter year than 1986 - can it really be more than two years since we unveiled the Statue? At the AGM in March it seemed almost inevitable that we should be ...


The Sixteenth George Eliot Memorial Lecture- 1987, Beryl Gray Jan 1987

The Sixteenth George Eliot Memorial Lecture- 1987, Beryl Gray

The George Eliot Review

Although from its first chapter the novel evolves towards the crises of Maggie's brief maturity, my focus here is on the two final Books of The Mill on the Floss. Book VI is called "The Great Temptation"; Book VII is called ''The Final Rescue". Taken together, these two Books can be read as an allegory of moral struggle and redemption.

The temptation itself is located in Paradise. Indeed, the first chapter of Book VI - ''The Great Temptation" - is entitled" A Duet in Paradise". In conjunction, the key titular words - "Temptation" and "Paradise" - conjure the Temptation in the Garden of ...


"Listening" A Poem Inspired By Middlemarch, M.A. Valk Jan 1987

"Listening" A Poem Inspired By Middlemarch, M.A. Valk

The George Eliot Review

LISTENING

Listening to silence

on its other side

hearing the grass grow

the beat of a bird's heart

the fall of a star

Shall 1 die of the roar

waiting for silence

to break - like glass?