Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Comparative Literature Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

“If Neurotic Is Wanting Two Mutually Exclusive Things At One And The Same Time, Then I'M Neurotic As Hell:” The Fight Against Fragmentation And Reduction In The 1960s Female Bildungsroman: O’Brien, Plath, And Lessing, Lauren Ogg Jan 2019

“If Neurotic Is Wanting Two Mutually Exclusive Things At One And The Same Time, Then I'M Neurotic As Hell:” The Fight Against Fragmentation And Reduction In The 1960s Female Bildungsroman: O’Brien, Plath, And Lessing, Lauren Ogg

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In this project I have examined three novels dating from the early 1960s that coincide with the start of second-wave feminism. These novels are classified as female Bildungsromans, a genre of novel that is in place to offer a voice to the misrepresented women of the classic Bildungsroman, whose lives were expected to end in marriage or a curated happy ending. The cluster of novels that challenge the Bildungsroman expectations in both form and content are the following: Edna O’Brien’s The Country Girls (1960), Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar (1963), and Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook ...


The Forgotten Beauty Of The Feminine: Elena Guro’S The Little Camels Of The Sky, Virginia Woolf’S The Waves, And The Holy Grail Of The “Woman’S Sentence”, Bailey Orr May 2018

The Forgotten Beauty Of The Feminine: Elena Guro’S The Little Camels Of The Sky, Virginia Woolf’S The Waves, And The Holy Grail Of The “Woman’S Sentence”, Bailey Orr

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In her seminal 1929 feminist essay “A Room of One’s Own,” Virginia Woolf bemoans the lack of a utopian “woman’s sentence” vis-à-vis the “men’s sentence” that has dominated literature and from which no woman writer has successfully managed to free herself. Indeed, the aforementioned quotes illustrate a yearning for a nonexistent, or long-forgotten, language that expresses the linguistically inexpressible. In my thesis, I propose that both the English novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf and the Russian poet and artist Elena Guro establish the optimal creative state as independent of the burden of masculine language. In their respective ...


Marriage: Suffering And Bliss, Shannon O'Connor Jan 2013

Marriage: Suffering And Bliss, Shannon O'Connor

Undergraduate Honors Theses

In The Canterbury Tales, the perfect marriage is one where tension leads to yielding, resulting in bliss. According to the Wife of Bath, she has enough authority on the topic of marriage, through her extensive life experience, to lecture on "the wo that is in marriage." While on a pilgrimage to Canterbury, she draws attention to a gender-power struggle in marriage, and through her prologue and tale, explores a theme of what women most desire. Mouthing conventional misogynistic notions of the time, Alisoun seeks the kind of authority that within her culture is traditionally offered to men. She exemplifies a ...