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Comparative Literature Commons

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Women's Studies

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Articles 1 - 2 of 2

Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

Finch, Burney, Barbauld And The Brontes: Feminine Identity, Lori Ann Davis Jan 1992

Finch, Burney, Barbauld And The Brontes: Feminine Identity, Lori Ann Davis

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Modern readers of literature have occasionally noticed similarities in the themes and imagery of British women writers. These similarities have been argued as springing from either a shared cultural heritage or a gender-specific biological experience. Proponents of the 'nurture' camp suggest that common life experiences within western culture, including a shared literary history, political invisibility, and domestic responsibilities which set definite limits on intellectual pursuits worked to create in these women a shared consciousness, intimately connected to their personal identities, which encodes a distinctly feminine imprint on much of their work. Proponents of the 'nature' camp, on the other hand ...


A Taxonomy Of The Female Private Detective In Contemporary Literature, Michele Marie Regenold Jan 1992

A Taxonomy Of The Female Private Detective In Contemporary Literature, Michele Marie Regenold

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The name Sherlock Holmes is nearly synonymous with the word detective for many people due to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's vastly popular ratiocinative detective stories. However, Edgar Allan Poe is considered the author of the first ratiocinative or classical detective story in the 1840s. Poe introduced and Doyle masterfully articulated the classical detective formula while writers such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers continued the classical tradition well into the twentieth century (Cawelti 80).