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Full-Text Articles in Comparative Literature

Saturnine Constellations: Melancholy In Literary History And In The Works Of Baudelaire And Benjamin, Kevin Godbout Oct 2016

Saturnine Constellations: Melancholy In Literary History And In The Works Of Baudelaire And Benjamin, Kevin Godbout

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

Aristotle famously asked the question: why are extraordinary people so often melancholics? “Problem XXX,” written by Aristotle or one of his disciples, speculates that black bile, the humour once believed to cause melancholy, can promote a form of genius, a profound intellectual power. Walter Benjamin and Charles Baudelaire are two writers for whom this theory was true: though they suffered from gloominess and despondency, they also recognized that in the interior of sadness, and even madness, is a kernel of aesthetic, artistic, and philosophical truth. Melencolia illa heroica – whose theory was authoritatively formulated by Ficino, taking after Aristotle’s Problems ...


An Escape From Language Into Language: The Internal Exile Of Louis Wolfson, Antoine N. Rideau Sep 2016

An Escape From Language Into Language: The Internal Exile Of Louis Wolfson, Antoine N. Rideau

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This paper aims to show how the life and work of American francophone author Louis Wolfson - who suffered from schizophrenia and underwent a self-imposed exile from his own mother tongue - might serve to illuminate European émigré writers' relationships to multilingualism.


Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch Apr 2016

Molded From Clay: The Portrayal Of Jews Through The Golem In Yudel Rosenberg’S The Golem And The Wondrous Deeds Of The Maharal Of Prague And Gustav Meyrink’S Der Golem, Reynolds Nelson Hahamovitch

Undergraduate Honors Theses

This thesis examines and compares Yudel Rosenberg’s The Golem and the Wondrous Deeds of the Maharal (1909) and Gustav Meyrink’s Der Golem (1915). These texts brought monumental changes to the Golem legend and brought the creature for the first time into popular modern literature. This thesis pays particular attention to how Rosenberg and Meyrink bind the Golem legend to the portrayal of the Jew in contemporary Jewish and non-Jewish discourses. I conclude my discussion of these two novels by examining them in light of the Finis Ghetto program, an urban renewal program which almost completely destroyed Prague’s ...


A Passage From Brooklyn To Ithaca: The Sea, The City And The Body In The Poetics Of Walt Whitman And C. P. Cavafy, Michael P. Skafidas Feb 2016

A Passage From Brooklyn To Ithaca: The Sea, The City And The Body In The Poetics Of Walt Whitman And C. P. Cavafy, Michael P. Skafidas

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This treatise is the first extensive comparative study of Walt Whitman and C. P. Cavafy. Despite the abundant scholarship dealing with the work and life of each, until now no critic has put the two poets together. Whitman’s poetry celebrates birth, youth, the self and the world as seen for the first time, while Cavafy’s diverts from the active present to resurrect a world whose key, in Eliot’s terms, is memory. Yet, I see the two poets conversing in the crossroads of the fin de siècle; the American Whitman and the Greek Cavafy embody the antithesis of ...


Creating With Anger: Contemplating Vendetta. An Analysis Of Anger In Italian And Spanish Women Writers Of The Early Modern Era, Luisanna Sardu Castangia Feb 2016

Creating With Anger: Contemplating Vendetta. An Analysis Of Anger In Italian And Spanish Women Writers Of The Early Modern Era, Luisanna Sardu Castangia

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

In the vast gamut of human emotions, anger is one of the most complex, provocative, and enduring. From Greek philosophers working in antiquity to today’s most recent theories on emotions, most scholars agree that anger has a multifaceted nature. This near universal agreement across the barriers of time and geography stems from the following facts: in order to exist, anger involves the participation of other emotions; anger does not have an opposite; anger leads an individual to engage in an act of self-analysis and in an evaluation of other individuals; and, finally, anger inspires action to right a wrong ...


Power, Sexuality, And The Masochistic Aesthetic From Sacher-Masoch To Kharms, Maya Vinokour Jan 2016

Power, Sexuality, And The Masochistic Aesthetic From Sacher-Masoch To Kharms, Maya Vinokour

Publicly Accessible Penn Dissertations

This project centers on what I call the “masochistic aesthetic,” which emerged as literature dovetailed with medicine and law in German-speaking Europe and Russia around 1900. I argue that incipient totalitarian societies instrumentalized art and literature to produce citizens who enthusiastically consented to painful social discipline — that is, political masochists. Masochistic narratives like Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s Venus in Furs (1870), Anton Chekhov’s The Duel (1891), or Andrei Platonov’s Happy Moscow (1933-6) reflect the ethnographic attention to borderlands, regulation of the body, and indefinite delay of pleasure inherent in the imperial or totalitarian settings that engendered them. After ...