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Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Golden In Glass, Emily Price Apr 2018

Golden In Glass, Emily Price

Honors Projects

The hymn chosen for this glass piece is “Jerusalem the Golden” which was written by Bernard of Cluny in the 12th century and set to music by John Neale in the 19th century. The original tune given to the hymn is known as “Ewing” and was written by Alexander Ewing. Although this hymn is not used in all hymnals and is not as widely known as hymns like “Amazing Grace,” it is a lovely, hopeful one that paints a picture of the wonders of heaven.

Hymn singing is an important part of the Christian church service and has ...


The Stained Glass Windows Of The Dewey Graduate Library, Kristen Thornton-De Stafeno Jan 2017

The Stained Glass Windows Of The Dewey Graduate Library, Kristen Thornton-De Stafeno

Dewey Graduate Library History

The history and description of the ten 20th century stained glass windows given to the Dewey Graduate Library of the University at Albany by the senior classes of the State Normal College and the New York state college of Teachers.


Sea Floor Stained Glass Women’S Tailored Suit, Yayna Zhuk, Joycelyn Burdett Jan 2014

Sea Floor Stained Glass Women’S Tailored Suit, Yayna Zhuk, Joycelyn Burdett

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

The objective of this project was to create a sharp new and stylish high end fashion look for a young and energetic person.


Gaudi Glass, Tracy Jennings Jan 2013

Gaudi Glass, Tracy Jennings

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

The purpose of Gaudi Glass was to explore the stained glass creations of Spanish architect Antoni Gaudi and use his work as inspiration for fashion design. Gaudi was noted for incorporating organic, curvilinear shapes in his architecture and in ironwork, ceramics, and stained glass.


Choosing Glass: Color And Impressions, Robert N. Oddy Oct 2011

Choosing Glass: Color And Impressions, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

In the last issue of Glass Craftsman, I said that, for me, the choice of glass is probably the most important factor contributing to artistry in stained glass. Tiffany’s company made glass for specific purposes, and raised the medium to a new level of expressive power. Now, we have a huge selection of stained glass available for our creative purposes. We just have to make the effort to familiarize ourselves to what is out there.


The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Techniques, Robert N. Oddy Oct 2011

The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Techniques, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Spontaneity In Stained Glass Work, Robert N. Oddy Jul 2011

Spontaneity In Stained Glass Work, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Stained glass does not lend itself to spontaneity. We design, thinking always about how the glass will be cut and what glass will be available to us. Then, the fabrication is a very slow and meticulous process, requiring accuracy of cutting so that the pieces fit together closely – glass doesn’t bend, stretch or squash. We have to do too much careful planning, and too much engineering! How can we make our subjects come alive, with movement and energy, when we cannot use our bodies to express these things while we are doing the art?


The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Exposed To The Light, Robert N. Oddy Jul 2011

The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Exposed To The Light, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Stained glass artwork often looks flat. Of course, most stained glass panels are flat. What I mean is that the objects depicted look flat. In my own work, I have given a lot of attention to creating the illusion of depth. What is depth? It refers to the spacial dimension that recedes directly away from our eyes into the distance. If a picture has depth, we see some of its elements as solid objects; some appear closer than others; we are aware of foreground, middle distance and background.


Line Relationships: More To Lines Than Meets The Eye, Robert N. Oddy Apr 2011

Line Relationships: More To Lines Than Meets The Eye, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

Lines in stained glass artwork are important design features. With copper foil and lead came techniques, they are often prominent and black with the light source behind them. Carefully designed and implemented lines can enhance the sense of depth in a picture and have a rather paradoxical nature in our work. I find that I have a rather complicated relationship with my lines.


The Lead Line Effect: Shape Without The Came, Robert N. Oddy Apr 2011

The Lead Line Effect: Shape Without The Came, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

In a previous article, I have mentioned my view that stained glass work is akin to impressionism. We use the features of the glass to suggest detail in our subject matter. However, I often find that for some details, this approach is not adequate. For an example, see the scales in Koi, figure 1. It is also not always practical to implement this fine detail by joining large numbers of very small pieces of glass. In this article, I will talk about methods that produce effects compatible with the ‘lead’ lines of traditional stained glass, namely the use of copper ...


Line Relationships: More To Lines Than Meets The Eye, Robert N. Oddy Mar 2011

Line Relationships: More To Lines Than Meets The Eye, Robert N. Oddy

Robert Oddy

Lines in stained glass artwork are important design features. With copper foil and lead came techniques, they are often prominent and black with the light source behind them. Carefully designed and implemented lines can enhance the sense of depth in a picture and have a rather paradoxical nature in our work. I find that I have a rather complicated relationship with my lines.


Plating In Stained Glass: Experience The Beauty, Robert N. Oddy Jan 2011

Plating In Stained Glass: Experience The Beauty, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

“Plating” is a piece of stained glass jargon. It refers to the practice of using more than one layer of glass in the construction of a panel. The layers are not fused together. They are simply stacked up, one on top of another and joined by soldering foil or came. I would like to spend a little time on the reasons for using this plating technique. In a future article I may say more about the techniques themselves, but the why’s are more important than the how’s.


The Lead Line Effect: Shape Without The Came, Robert Oddy Dec 2010

The Lead Line Effect: Shape Without The Came, Robert Oddy

Robert Oddy

In a previous article, I have mentioned my view that stained glass work is akin to impressionism. We use the features of the glass to suggest detail in our subject matter. However, I often find that for some details, this approach is not adequate. For an example, see the scales in Koi, figure 1. It is also not always practical to implement this fine detail by joining large numbers of very small pieces of glass. In this article, I will talk about methods that produce effects compatible with the ‘lead’ lines of traditional stained glass, namely the use of copper ...


Plating In Stained Glass: Experience The Beauty, Robert Oddy Dec 2010

Plating In Stained Glass: Experience The Beauty, Robert Oddy

Robert Oddy

“Plating” is a piece of stained glass jargon. It refers to the practice of using more than one layer of glass in the construction of a panel. The layers are not fused together. They are simply stacked up, one on top of another and joined by soldering foil or came. I would like to spend a little time on the reasons for using this plating technique. In a future article I may say more about the techniques themselves, but the why’s are more important than the how’s.


The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Techniques, Robert N. Oddy Dec 2010

The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Techniques, Robert N. Oddy

Robert Oddy

No abstract provided.


The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Exposed To The Light, Robert N. Oddy Dec 2010

The Illusion Of Depth In Stained Glass: Exposed To The Light, Robert N. Oddy

Robert Oddy

Stained glass artwork often looks flat. Of course, most stained glass panels are flat. What I mean is that the objects depicted look flat. In my own work, I have given a lot of attention to creating the illusion of depth. What is depth? It refers to the spacial dimension that recedes directly away from our eyes into the distance. If a picture has depth, we see some of its elements as solid objects; some appear closer than others; we are aware of foreground, middle distance and background.


Choosing Glass: Color And Impressions, Robert N. Oddy Dec 2010

Choosing Glass: Color And Impressions, Robert N. Oddy

Robert Oddy

In the last issue of Glass Craftsman, I said that, for me, the choice of glass is probably the most important factor contributing to artistry in stained glass. Tiffany’s company made glass for specific purposes, and raised the medium to a new level of expressive power. Now, we have a huge selection of stained glass available for our creative purposes. We just have to make the effort to familiarize ourselves to what is out there.


Spontaneity In Stained Glass Work, Robert N. Oddy Dec 2010

Spontaneity In Stained Glass Work, Robert N. Oddy

Robert Oddy

Stained glass does not lend itself to spontaneity. We design, thinking always about how the glass will be cut and what glass will be available to us. Then, the fabrication is a very slow and meticulous process, requiring accuracy of cutting so that the pieces fit together closely – glass doesn’t bend, stretch or squash. We have to do too much careful planning, and too much engineering! How can we make our subjects come alive, with movement and energy, when we cannot use our bodies to express these things while we are doing the art?


The Fall And Rise Of "Owl", Robert N. Oddy Jan 2007

The Fall And Rise Of "Owl", Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

This article is an account of the work of restoring Owl back to good health. Although the task was initially daunting–and I put it off for a while favoring new creations—it turned out to be interesting. I was able to relive the experience of building one of my early windows, going back to an early stage in my career as a stained glass artist. I hope you will find this account good reading. One of the features that makes the Owl repair interesting is that many parts of the window are plated. In other words, they are made ...


The Fall And Rise Of "Owl", Robert N. Oddy Dec 2006

The Fall And Rise Of "Owl", Robert N. Oddy

Robert Oddy

This article is an account of the work of restoring Owl back to good health. Although the task was initially daunting–and I put it off for a while favoring new creations—it turned out to be interesting. I was able to relive the experience of building one of my early windows, going back to an early stage in my career as a stained glass artist. I hope you will find this account good reading. One of the features that makes the Owl repair interesting is that many parts of the window are plated. In other words, they are made ...


A Stained Glass Artist’S Adventure Into Sculpture: Adding A New Dimension To My Work, Robert N. Oddy Jan 2001

A Stained Glass Artist’S Adventure Into Sculpture: Adding A New Dimension To My Work, Robert N. Oddy

School of Information Studies - Faculty Scholarship

No abstract provided.


A Stained Glass Artist’S Adventure Into Sculpture: Adding A New Dimension To My Work, Robert Oddy Dec 2000

A Stained Glass Artist’S Adventure Into Sculpture: Adding A New Dimension To My Work, Robert Oddy

Robert Oddy

No abstract provided.


Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 38, No. 4, Ann S. Burrows, Ruthanne Hartung, Stuart Helble, Karen Helble, Frank J. Gallagher, Rae Greiner, William Dean Wright, Wayne Hartzell, Anne Hartzell, Teresa A. Skoog, Mark Osterman, Keith Brintzenhoff, Frederick J. Saul, Beth Kreider, Richard Thomas Jul 1989

Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 38, No. 4, Ann S. Burrows, Ruthanne Hartung, Stuart Helble, Karen Helble, Frank J. Gallagher, Rae Greiner, William Dean Wright, Wayne Hartzell, Anne Hartzell, Teresa A. Skoog, Mark Osterman, Keith Brintzenhoff, Frederick J. Saul, Beth Kreider, Richard Thomas

Pennsylvania Folklife Magazine

• Celebrating Twenty-Five Years of Quintessential Quilts
• The Folk Art of Fraktur
• Molding & Spinning Pewter
• Kaleidoscopes & Unique Stained Glass
• Dolls are Not Just for Children Anymore
• Paint Decorated Chests of the Pennsylvania Dutch
• Festival Focus
• Festival Programs
• Tiffany-Style Stained Glass Lamps
• Be Aware of What Might be Hiding in Grandma's Attic
• The Medicine Show
• Pennsylvania Dutch Music & More
• A Poor Damsel's Fate
• Silk Screening
• Long Time Favorite Festival Foods


Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 32, No. 4, John F. Harnish Jr., Gladys Sweigard, Richard Shaner, John L. Lakatosh, Karen Lemonnier, Herman A. Danenhower, Dave Ehrig, Thelia Jean Eaby, James Petrucelli, Larry L. Rahn, William Dean Wright, Ronald Kunkel, Cindy Kunkel, Robert Nettleton, Cheryl Nettleton, Jane Ann Stinsmen Jul 1983

Pennsylvania Folklife Vol. 32, No. 4, John F. Harnish Jr., Gladys Sweigard, Richard Shaner, John L. Lakatosh, Karen Lemonnier, Herman A. Danenhower, Dave Ehrig, Thelia Jean Eaby, James Petrucelli, Larry L. Rahn, William Dean Wright, Ronald Kunkel, Cindy Kunkel, Robert Nettleton, Cheryl Nettleton, Jane Ann Stinsmen

Pennsylvania Folklife Magazine

• Frakturs
• Apple Head Dolls are Unique
• Tableware and Dutch Folklore
• The Pipemaker
• Wheat Weaving
• Beekeeping: Past and Present
• The Pennsylvania Longrifle
• Festival Focus
• Folk Festival Programs
• Quilts
• The Country Butcher
• Stained Glass
• Metal Casting in Sand
• Is This Pure Leather?
• The Horse and Carriage
• Marquetry, Parquetry and Intarsia
• Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking