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University of Nebraska - Lincoln

2004

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Articles 61 - 69 of 69

Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Contemporary Tapestry In A Cross-Cultural Context And The Work Of Janet Moore, Christine Laffer Jan 2004

Contemporary Tapestry In A Cross-Cultural Context And The Work Of Janet Moore, Christine Laffer

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Weavings and their techniques and attributes, have constantly crossed cultural boundaries whether along trade routes or between neighboring communities. At the same time, they have been claimed as identifiers of their makers’ cultures and territorialized to prevent “stealing.” In contemporary art practice, an act of appropriation is often seen as an act of aggression. Appropriation, from the artist's perspective, serves the purpose of social critique, in particular aimed at the cultural arenas controlled by the art world. However, exchanges that take place through viewing and interpreting the textiles of another culture are under minimal political or social control.

Tapestries ...


The Jicarilla Apache Woman's Ceremonial Cape The Making And Re-Genesis Of A Cultural Icon, Joyce Herold Jan 2004

The Jicarilla Apache Woman's Ceremonial Cape The Making And Re-Genesis Of A Cultural Icon, Joyce Herold

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Women of the tiny Jicarilla Apache tribe of north-central New Mexico have one of the most vibrant and distinctive poncho traditions of any contemporary American Indian group. Based on the yoke of the early 1800s deerskin “tail dress” design, the Jicarilla cape became a separate item of apparel. that was decorated in a classic mode with scallops and fringes, yellow paint, and striped beadwork edges. The cape design signifies woman’s origins and fruitfulness connected with the moon and its phases; thus it functions as necessary raiment and a powerful symbol at a Jicarilla Girl’s Coming Out Ceremony and ...


Nets, Bags And The Transformation Of Headdress In The Southern Andes, Ann H. Peters Jan 2004

Nets, Bags And The Transformation Of Headdress In The Southern Andes, Ann H. Peters

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Anne Paul opened the pandora’s box of Andean headdress history in “The Symbolism of Paracas Turbans: A consideration of Style, Serpents and Hair” (Ñawpa Pacha 1982). Mary Frame’s work on the multiple textile significations of twisted strands, looping, diagonal interlacing and other techniques used to create headdress bands has led to new insights on the relationships among textile practice, visual design, and concepts and philosophical premises encoded in many forms of Andean material culture.

This paper looks at the associations of form, practice, and textile history embodied in netted and looped head coverings preserved in burials on the ...


Transformations In Tapestry In The Ayacucho Region Of Peru, Elayne Zorn Jan 2004

Transformations In Tapestry In The Ayacucho Region Of Peru, Elayne Zorn

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This article examines contemporary Peruvian tapestry in its historical context. Though tapestry production represents a significant source of income for weavers in Ayacucho, Peru, the contemporary industry has not yet been studied in the context of long-term Andean textile traditions and their historical transformations. Ayacucho is home to numerous crafts traditions, but also terrible violence during Peru’s undeclared civil war (1980–95), which started there. The paper provides an overview of contemporary Andean textiles, emphasizing differences between textiles woven on the pre-Hispanic type Andean loom, and those such as tapestry woven on the Hispanic-type treadle loom. The technology of ...


Interpreting Social Change And Changing Production Through Examinations Of Textiles Of Xam Nuea And Surin, Charles Carroll Jan 2004

Interpreting Social Change And Changing Production Through Examinations Of Textiles Of Xam Nuea And Surin, Charles Carroll

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

This paper explores the transformation of the Lao Xam Nuea style sin muk through two different approaches to the examination of change in practice. In the process, the paper reveals ways in which changing handloom production in Southeast Asia are inextricably embedded within broader changing social practices. The first part of this paper presents an historical and structural analysis of revolutionary migration and technological transformation of the Lao Xam Nuea style sin muk. The analysis examines the adaptation of techniques in the adoption of the Xam Nuea style through the comparison of Vientiane and Xam Nuea sin muk. This initial ...


Tradition And Transformation In Chicahuaxtla Trique Textiles, Cecilia Gunzburger Jan 2004

Tradition And Transformation In Chicahuaxtla Trique Textiles, Cecilia Gunzburger

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

San Andres Chicahuaxtla is a Trique-speaking village in the mountains of the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca. This paper explores changes in Chicahuaxtla Trique textiles and costume over the previous half century as women incorporated newly available commercial products into their indigenous weaving tradition.

Contact with the outside world and access to manufactured goods gradually accelerated, yet hand-woven clothing remains a strong component of women’s cultural identity. Although trade in textiles between Mesoamerican villages is certainly nothing new, the 20th century brought new materials like factory-spun and – dyed cotton and acrylic yarn in a wide range of colors ...


Changes In Nomadic Arab Weaving Due To Outside And Internal Influences, Joy May Hilden Jan 2004

Changes In Nomadic Arab Weaving Due To Outside And Internal Influences, Joy May Hilden

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Centuries of tradition in the weaving of the Bedouin, using sheepswool and goat hair, has changed dramatically in the last fifty years. With the decline of nomadism, due directly and indirectly to the discovery of oil, techniques and products have fallen to disuse or have been transformed with new materials and put to new uses.

Bedouin weaving was formerly used for tents, rugs and animal gear by nomadic Arab tribes in Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar, Iraq, Syria, Jordan, Palestine/Israel and Egypt. Lifestyles among and influences on the bedu vary by region, but the decline of nomadism is common to ...


The Tale Of The Two-Tailed Mermaid A Case Study In The Origins Of The Cretan Embroidery Style, Sumru Belger Krody Jan 2004

The Tale Of The Two-Tailed Mermaid A Case Study In The Origins Of The Cretan Embroidery Style, Sumru Belger Krody

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

It is fascinating to trace the style and motifs of embroidered textiles from the Greek islands back to the political powers that held the islands in their control for centuries. Among these islands Crete has a special place in the study of Greek island embroidery. Because of its geographic location among trade routes and its political and artistic history, Crete presents an entirely different embroidery style from that of the other Greek islands. Through focusing on one motif, the two-tailed mermaid, this paper will try to construct a history of influences seen in Cretan embroidery.

The first section of the ...


Author Biographies Jan 2004

Author Biographies

Textile Society of America Symposium Proceedings

Author Biographies A-W

Ping-Ann Addo

Filiz Adıgüzel

Jeni Allenby

Philis Alvic...

Wendy Weiss

Lauren Whitley

Michelle Willard