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Syracuse University

Bradel binding

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Platten En Perkament, Peter D. Verheyen, Marlene Hoogeveen (Translator) Oct 2012

Platten En Perkament, Peter D. Verheyen, Marlene Hoogeveen (Translator)

Libraries' and Librarians' Publications

Translation into Dutch for Handboekbinden (Journal of the Stichting Handboekbinden) by Marlene Hoogeveen of: Peter D. Verheyen. "Vellum on Boards" The Guild of Book Workers Journal 39 (2004). Vellum is arguably one of the most beautiful binding materials in use, and at the same time one of the least used in modern design bindings. While it is often used in limp bindings, its use “over hard boards” has been much more limited. A study of the bookbinding literature reveals it being covered in-depth to a larger degree in German language trade manuals than in English. This could explain their seemingly ...


Der Gebrochene Rücken: A Variation Of The German Case Binding, Peter D. Verheyen Jan 2009

Der Gebrochene Rücken: A Variation Of The German Case Binding, Peter D. Verheyen

Libraries' and Librarians' Publications

The “gebrochene rücken” is variant of the German case “Bradel” binding, something often described as the quintessential German binding structure. It is precise and adaptive to a variety of needs and aesthetic considerations can be worked “in boards” or as a case. Its closest modern relative is the simplified binding (reliure simplifée) as demonstrated by Sün Evrard and Laura Wait. While there are structural differences (that are not as great as one would think given that one is German and the other French), what both these bindings have in common is that they allow for the use of different covering ...


The German Case Binding, Peter D. Verheyen Jan 2006

The German Case Binding, Peter D. Verheyen

Libraries' and Librarians' Publications

The case (Bradel) binding is the most common, general purpose binding structure in use by binders in Germany. What sets it apart from other case bindings is that the cover boards and spine stiffener are joined together with a strip of sturdy paper before covering. This allows the covers to be fit precisely to the textblock, especially at the joint and fore-edge. For this reason the structure is also very well suited to beginners. Books using this structure are generally covered in full cloth, paper, or a combination of the two. The structure is not well suited to leather binding ...


Millimeter Binding / Edelpappband, Peter D. Verheyen Jan 2005

Millimeter Binding / Edelpappband, Peter D. Verheyen

Libraries' and Librarians' Publications

What we call the “millimeter” binding in North America is a “nobler” version of the German “pappband,” or paper binding, hence the name “edelpappband.” The technique is based on the German case (Bradel) binding which is covered in paper. What distinguishes the technique is that cloth, leather, or vellum trim is added to the head and tail, foredges, and/or corners for greater durability, making the book more elegant at the same time. This article describes how to complete a binding using this technique.


Vellum On Boards, Peter D. Verheyen Jan 2004

Vellum On Boards, Peter D. Verheyen

Libraries' and Librarians' Publications

Vellum is arguably one of the most beautiful binding materials in use, and at the same time one of the least used in modern design bindings. While it is often used in limp bindings, its use “over hard boards” has been much more limited. A study of the bookbinding literature reveals it being covered in-depth to a larger degree in German language trade manuals than in English. This could explain their seemingly greater popularity in Germany, as evidenced by reproductions in exhibition catalogs and other publications. With a decline in traditional training opportunities, it is becoming increasing difficult to find ...