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Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Study Of Native Colombian Tribes' Art As A Mean Of Inspiration, Sofia Fernandez Apr 2020

Study Of Native Colombian Tribes' Art As A Mean Of Inspiration, Sofia Fernandez

UCARE Research Products

Culture is one of the most important aspects of a human being, it shapes our behavior and identity since we are born. It is our lifestyle and it refers to many aspects such as the language we use, our values, traditions, beliefs, etc. Cultural diversity is one of the aspects communities nowadays emphasize the most, they want people to be mindful and respectful of the different cultures represented within the community itself. This creative project examines Latin American art, particularly Indigenous Colombian art as a source of inspiration for the creation of a series of artworks. This project aims to ...


I Poked You Where We Were Connected, Sophia Ruppert Apr 2020

I Poked You Where We Were Connected, Sophia Ruppert

Theses, Dissertations, and Student Creative Activity, School of Art, Art History and Design

Life leaves behind physical and mental residue. Some of these remnants are precious while others are tragic. Regardless of its origin, this residue can be made beautiful. Remnants of the objects that surround us chronicle our history as complex individuals. My sculptures investigate my own physical and mental residue to dissect and examine my personal history.
I unravel experiences that are residually prominent in my memories. Of particular importance are events and objects that have shaped my perception of self.
stories told by my grandmothers
a dysfunctional family dynamic
objects that provide visual touchstones to my childhood
These fragments are ...


A New Kind Of Loom In Early Roman Egypt? How Iconography Could Explain (Or Not) Papyrological Evidence, Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert Mar 2020

A New Kind Of Loom In Early Roman Egypt? How Iconography Could Explain (Or Not) Papyrological Evidence, Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

The question of the different kinds of loom used in ancient Egypt is one of the most crucial issues to understanding the evolution of textile production and its technological development in the Nile Valley. However, sources concerning looms (archaeological, iconographic and written) from the Pharaonic era until the Arab medieval period are meagre, and many research questions remain open. This article is an attempt at a new interpretation of some evidence, particularly iconographic and papyrological, which could add new data to the study of weaving looms used in Egypt of the early Roman period (1st–2nd century AD).


Frontmatter For Egyptian Textiles And Their Production: ‘Word’ And ‘Object’. (Hellenistic, Roman And Byzantine Periods), Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert Mar 2020

Frontmatter For Egyptian Textiles And Their Production: ‘Word’ And ‘Object’. (Hellenistic, Roman And Byzantine Periods), Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

Covers

Dedication

Contents

Introduction by Maria Mossakowska-Gaubert

Contributors


Egyptian Pit-Looms From The Late First Millennium Ad — Attempts In Reconstruction From The Archaeological Evidence, Johanna Sigl Mar 2020

Egyptian Pit-Looms From The Late First Millennium Ad — Attempts In Reconstruction From The Archaeological Evidence, Johanna Sigl

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

In discussions on the development of weaving technology, specifically treadle looms in the Mediterranean area, Egypt is often referred to as one of the earliest countries in which people used foot-powered looms for producing cloth. It is thought to have been in regular use in the production of cloth as early as the second half of the 1st millennium AD. This belief is built on results from excavations undertaken during the early 20th century by the Egypt Exploration Fund at the hill of Sheikh Abd el-Qurna in Luxor, as well as on textile studies. Unfortunately, none of the postulated looms ...


What Flaws Can Tell: A Case Study On Weaving Faults In Late Roman And Early Medieval Weft-Faced Compound Fabrics From Egypt, Barbara Köstner Mar 2020

What Flaws Can Tell: A Case Study On Weaving Faults In Late Roman And Early Medieval Weft-Faced Compound Fabrics From Egypt, Barbara Köstner

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

Silk samites from Late Roman and Early Medieval Egypt are well-known objects in museum collections all over the world. One group of fragments, the so-called Akhmim silks, show a mechanically repeated floral pattern. More than 100 examples with this design are known; the fragments bear striking similarities in design and technique. Were they woven in the same workshop? If all or at least a large number of pieces could be traced back to several batches of production, this would lead to further insights concerning the economics of early silk weaving. A detailed analysis of two exemplary pieces reveals features that ...


Ancient Greek Dyeing: A Terminological Approach, Peder Flemestad Mar 2020

Ancient Greek Dyeing: A Terminological Approach, Peder Flemestad

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

The Oxford English Dictionary defines dyeing as: “to impregnate (any tissue or the like) with a colour, to fix a colour in the substance of, or to change the hue of by a colouring matter”. In ancient Greek this operation is in general expressed by the verb βάπτειν, but the process of dyeing could be designated by a multitude of other terms. The following contribution provides an overview of the extensive ancient Greek terminology for the action of dyeing. The focus therefore lies primarily on the verbs designating the dyeing process itself, while wider dye terminology is only occasionally touched ...


Dyeing In Texts And Textiles: Words Expressing Ancient Technology, Ines Bogensperger, Helgo Rösel-Mautendorfer Mar 2020

Dyeing In Texts And Textiles: Words Expressing Ancient Technology, Ines Bogensperger, Helgo Rösel-Mautendorfer

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

The complex chaîne opératoire of ancient textile production in various stages has been frequently discussed by textile scholars. According to documentary papyri, textile manufacturing represented the highest taxed industry after agriculture. This emphasises its importance as a significant sector in the ancient economy. A highly specialised branch within the chaîne opératoire is the dyeing industry. Ancient dyers used natural and animal dyestuffs, as well as different dyeing techniques to achieve their colourful results. They were also aware of the specific properties of the different textile fibres. In ancient times, wool and linen were the characteristic materials for manufacturing textiles, but ...


How (Not) To Organise Roman Textile Production. Some Considerations On Merchant-Entrepreneurs In Roman Egypt And The Ἱστωνάρχης, Kerstin Droß-Krüpe Mar 2020

How (Not) To Organise Roman Textile Production. Some Considerations On Merchant-Entrepreneurs In Roman Egypt And The Ἱστωνάρχης, Kerstin Droß-Krüpe

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

For almost the last 100 years, various ancient historians have suggested that organisations comparable to the “putting- out” system existed in the Roman Imperial period. They are most commonly believed to have occurred in textile production. As early as 1913, Theodor Reil assumed that the production of textiles in Roman Egypt was organised through the putting-out system. This idea can subsequently be traced through more than a century to recent publications. However, as this assumption is rarely based on genuine source material, it seems appropriate to get to the bottom of this hypothesis. In this context, special attention will also ...


Domestic Textile Production In Dakhleh Oasis In The Fourth Century Ad, Jennifer Cromwell Mar 2020

Domestic Textile Production In Dakhleh Oasis In The Fourth Century Ad, Jennifer Cromwell

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

Ancient Kellis, modern Ismant el-Kharab is located in Dakhleh Oasis in Egypt’s Western Desert. The main occupation of the village was from the early to late Roman period (late 1st century to the beginning of the 5th century AD). Excavated as part of the Dakhleh Oasis Project, the site has revealed textual and archaeological evidence from which a detailed picture of life can be painted. To date, the main publications of the village’s finds have focussed on the textual remains, of literary and documentary texts in Coptic, Greek, and Syriac.1 A comparable publication of the archaeological evidence ...


Conclusion: Egyptian Textiles And Their Production, Dominique Cardon Mar 2020

Conclusion: Egyptian Textiles And Their Production, Dominique Cardon

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

This book, “Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’ (Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine periods)” is both very useful and… frustrating. Indeed, all volumes of transactions of a scientific symposium are bound to be so, since research is a never-ending story. However, this is particularly true of textile research, which involves so many different approaches. Most of the relevant scientific domains are represented in this volume. There is a good combination of several reports on new research – recently studied archaeological textiles and iconographic documents on weaving – with attempts at syntheses of available evidence, both archaeological and textual, alongside useful critical ...


Reconstruction Of A Deconstructed Tunic, Anne Kwaspen Mar 2020

Reconstruction Of A Deconstructed Tunic, Anne Kwaspen

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

Tunics of the 1st millennium AD can be classified into two main groups according to the direction of the warp in the finished tunic. The first group of tunics has horizontal warp threads in the finished tunic. This means that the cloth as it is worn is rotated 90° from the weave direction on the loom. In the second group of tunics the warp runs vertically in the finished tunic. Each group of tunics has their typical technological features and finishing methods, with additional distinctions between wool and linen tunics. This article focuses on the study of a tunic belonging ...


Tackling The Technical History Of The Textiles Of El-Deir, Kharga Oasis, The Western Desert Of Egypt, Fleur Letellier-Willemin Mar 2020

Tackling The Technical History Of The Textiles Of El-Deir, Kharga Oasis, The Western Desert Of Egypt, Fleur Letellier-Willemin

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

The site of El-Deir is situated north of Kharga in the “Great Oasis” of the Egyptian Western Desert (fig. 1). The site was occupied between the 6th century BC and the 6th century AD. A complex history emerged with the influence of many cultures: Persian, Greek, Roman and early Christian. Archaeological finds in both El-Deir and the oasis itself (the site of Dush and the temple of Darius in Hibis, a city north of Kharga) confirm that the Great Oasis was a wealthy region. This is also substantiated by texts from Ain Manawir and Dakhleh. The presence of an artesian ...


Textile Production In The Papyri: The Case Of Private Request Letters, Aikaterini Koroli Mar 2020

Textile Production In The Papyri: The Case Of Private Request Letters, Aikaterini Koroli

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

Throughout the “papyrological millennium”, that is from the 3rd century BC to the 8th century AD, both administrative and private life in Egypt were largely based on letters. Apart from oral communication, letter writing, mostly on papyri and ostraca, was the only available form of communication for the inhabitants of the land of Nile when they needed to get in touch and exchange information with people who did not live in their immediate surroundings. Papyrus letters, written by and sent to private, ordinary people and not to the authorities, composed in the Greek vernacular and intended to fulfill a wide ...


Flax Growing In Late Antique Egypt: Evidence From The Aphrodito Papyri, Isabelle Marthot-Santaniello Feb 2020

Flax Growing In Late Antique Egypt: Evidence From The Aphrodito Papyri, Isabelle Marthot-Santaniello

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

While flax culture was a major economic sector in Egypt throughout antiquity and the medieval period, one can only agree with John R. Rea, the editor of P. Coll.Youtie II 68, when he says: “it has not escaped notice that surprisingly little information about [flax and linen] has been recovered from the Greek papyri”. By way of example, the specific word for the flax plant, linokalamē, appears in Greek papyri only in around 60 of more than 60,000 published texts. More specifically, the agricultural conditions set to produce flax are seldom visible in the texts: little more than ...


Textiles From A Late Roman/Byzantine Ecclesiastical Centre At Abu Sha’Ar, Egypt, Lise Bender Jørgensen Jan 2020

Textiles From A Late Roman/Byzantine Ecclesiastical Centre At Abu Sha’Ar, Egypt, Lise Bender Jørgensen

Egyptian textiles and their production: ‘word’ and ‘object’

Around AD 400 a group of Christians were looking for a new home. An abandoned Roman military fort at what is now called Abu Sha’ar, c. 20 km north of Hurghada on the Egyptian Red Sea coast, became the answer to their prayers. Steven Sidebotham of the University of Delaware excavated the site in 1987-1993. The fort had been established in AD 309-311 to house a mounted unit, the Ala Nova Maximiana, guarding the Via Nova Hadriana. The military phase was however short-lived: the soldiers abandoned the fort before AD 400. The new settlers turned the former military headquarters ...