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Fiber, Textile, and Weaving Arts

Iowa State University

Embroidery

Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Art and Design

Naturally Refined Series: Rippled, Lushan Sun, Sherry Haar Feb 2013

Naturally Refined Series: Rippled, Lushan Sun, Sherry Haar

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

As our world becomes more polluted, sustainable approaches in various aspects of society are gaining popularity and attention. Slow design was proposed after the slow food movement to promote slowing down production processes and increasing product quality and keepsake value (Fletcher, 2008).


Belle Curves, Colleen Moretz Feb 2013

Belle Curves, Colleen Moretz

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

Inspiration for this design was derived from Balenciaga’s statement: “A couturier must be: An architect for design, A sculptor for shape, A painter for colours, …” Fashion design follows a similar process as an architect: planning, designing, and constructing of form by the creative manipulation of material; as an sculptor: producing works of art in three dimensions; and as a painter: applying color to create an aesthetically pleasing composition.


Hmong Tradition, Nou Her Jan 2013

Hmong Tradition, Nou Her

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

“Hmong Tradition” was inspired by my cultural heritage. I was born in Thailand and learned traditional cross stitch embroidery from my mother; like many Hmong women, she embroidered fabrics to send to the US as a means of supporting our family.


Remember The Alamo, Theresa Alexandar Jan 2013

Remember The Alamo, Theresa Alexandar

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

The purpose of this project was to create a jacket very similar to that worn by the by the Mexican army officers during the 1820s-1830s but with a slightly design twist through the use of vibrant purple accents. It was also an exploration in the combination of traditional embroidery techniques and chemical surface design techniques.